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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
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Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, ANTONINUS ET FAUSTINA, TEMPLUM (search)
ANTONINUS ET FAUSTINA, TEMPLUM the temple built by Antoninus Pius on the north side of the Sacra via at the entrance to the forum, just wast of the basilica Aemilia, in honour of his deified wife, the empress Faustina, who died in 141 A.D. (Hist. Aug. Pius 6). After the death of Antoninus himself in 161, the temple was dedicated to both together (Hist. Aug. Pius 13). The inscription on the architrave records the first dedication, and that added afterwards on the frieze records the econd (CIL vi. 1005: divo Antonino et divae Faustinae ex s.c.). In onsequence of this double dedication the proper name of the temple was templum d. Antonini et d. Faustinae (so a fragment of the Fasti if 213-236 A.D., CIL vi. 2001), but it was also called templum Faustinae (Hist. Aug. Salon. I; Not. Reg. IV) and templum d. Pii (Hist. Aug. Carac. 4). It is represented on coins of Faustina (Cohen 2, Faustina senior, Nos. I, 64-71, 191-194, 253-255, 274). In the seventh>/dateRange> or eighth century th
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, SACRA VIA (search)
reet between the atrium Vestae and the arch of Titus. Many inscriptions have been found relating to the tradesmen of the Sacra via, especially jewellers of all sorts (CIL vi. 9207, 9221, 9239, 9418, 9419, 9545-9549), and those who dealt in flowers, fruit and luxuries (vi. 9283, 9795, 9935). Going eastward from the exit of the Sacra via from the forum area between the temple of divus Iulius and the porticus Gai et Luci (AJA 1913, 14-28), the street passes on the north the temple of Faustina (141 A.D.), the archaic necropolis, the remains of private houses (HC 230-231; Mitt. 1902, 94; 1905, 116; Atti 570-574), the Heroon Romuli, and the basilica of Constantine; on the south the regia, the remains of houses and shops between the street and the atrium Vestae, and the great porticus (see above). (Jord. i. 2. 274-286, 415-416; HJ 14-15; Gilb. i. 214-220, 236-238, 300-335; RE i. A. 1674-1677; Thedenat 167-173, 353-356; HC 218-252 pass.; DR 498-506 ; M61. 1908, 233-253 for an erroneous theory
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Chronological Index to Dateable Monuments (search)
d Rome dedicated, 553. 138-161Reign of Antoninus Pius: perhaps completes Temple of Venus and Rome, 553; restores Temple of Bacchus on Sacra Via, 321: of Aesculapius ?), 2: of Augustus, 62: Colosseum, 6: Graecostadium which had been burnt, 248; part of Circus Maximus collapses, 117; the Antonines build Ustrina, 545: restore House of Vestals, 60. 139Dedicatory inscription in Mausoleum of Hadrian, 336. 139-143Balineum Mamertini, 70. 141(after). Temple in Forum dedicated to Faustina, 13. 143Curia Athletarum, 142. 145Temple dedicated to Divus Hadrianus, 250. 161Terminal stones of Tiber banks, 538. 161-180Reign of Marcus Aurelius: Arco di Portogallo (?), 33; Temple of Mercury (?), 339; M. Aurelius and L. Verus build column of Antoninus Pins, 131; Arcus Divi Veri, 47. 161(after). Temple of Faustina dedicated also to Antoninus, 13. 176Arches of M. Aurelius, 35, 37. 176Temple of Juppiter Heliopolitanus near
Fausti'na 1. ANNIA GALERIA FAUSTINA, commonly distinguished as Faustina Senior, whose descent is given in the genealogical table prefixed to the life of M. AURELIUS, married Antoninus Pius, while he was yet in a private station, and, when he became emperor, in A. D. 138, received the title of Augusta. She did not, however, long enjoy her honours, for she died, A. D. 141, in the thirty-seventh year of her age. The profligacy of her life, and the honours with which she was loaded both before and after her decease, have been noticed under ANTONINUS PIUS. The medals bearing her name and effigy exceed, both in number and variety of types, those struck in honour of any other royal personage after death. One of these represents the temple dedicated to her memory in the Via Sacra, which still remains in a very perfect state. (Capitolin. Anton. Pius, 3, 5; Eckhel, vol. vii. p. 37.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Justi'nus Martyr (search)
Lucius the Philosopher" (we follow the common reading, not that of Eusebius), afterwards the emperor Verus, colleague of M. Aurelius. From the circumstance that " Verissimus" is not styled Caesar, which dignity he acquired in the course of A. D. 139, it is inferred by many critics, including Pagi, Neander, Otto, and Semisch, that the Apology was written previously, and probably early in that year. Eusebius places it in the fourth year of Antoninus, or the first year of the 230th Olympiad, A. D. 141, which is rather too late. Others contend for a later date still. Justin himself, in the course of the work (100.46), states that Christ was born a hundred and fifty years before he wrote, but he must be understood as speaking in round numbers. However,Tillemont, Grabe, Fleury, Ceillier, Maran, and others, fix the date of the work in A. D. 150. To this Apology of Justin are commonly subjoined three documents. (1.) *)Adrianou= u(pe\r *Xristianw=n e)pistolh/, Adriani pro Christianis Epistol
Peducaeus 8. M. Peducaeus Stolga Priscinus, consul A. D. 141, with T. loenius Severus.
ast year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must have been a consul suffectus. Sealiger, Tillemont, and Clinton, have proposed various emenldations on the text of Suidas, Clinton conjecturally assigning his birth to A. D. 47, and consequently his 78th year to A. D. 124. (Fasti Rom. pp. 31, 111). After all, the text of Suidas may be correct enough. He expressly says that the life of Philon was very long protracted, pare/teinen ei)s makro/n ; and regarding Hadrian all he says is, he wrote peri\ th=s basilei/as, not that
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philon Byblius (search)
ast year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must have been a consul suffectus. Sealiger, Tillemont, and Clinton, have proposed various emenldations on the text of Suidas, Clinton conjecturally assigning his birth to A. D. 47, and consequently his 78th year to A. D. 124. (Fasti Rom. pp. 31, 111). After all, the text of Suidas may be correct enough. He expressly says that the life of Philon was very long protracted, pare/teinen ei)s makro/n ; and regarding Hadrian all he says is, he wrote peri\ th=s basilei/as, not that