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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 5 5 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 141 AD or search for 141 AD in all documents.

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Fausti'na 1. ANNIA GALERIA FAUSTINA, commonly distinguished as Faustina Senior, whose descent is given in the genealogical table prefixed to the life of M. AURELIUS, married Antoninus Pius, while he was yet in a private station, and, when he became emperor, in A. D. 138, received the title of Augusta. She did not, however, long enjoy her honours, for she died, A. D. 141, in the thirty-seventh year of her age. The profligacy of her life, and the honours with which she was loaded both before and after her decease, have been noticed under ANTONINUS PIUS. The medals bearing her name and effigy exceed, both in number and variety of types, those struck in honour of any other royal personage after death. One of these represents the temple dedicated to her memory in the Via Sacra, which still remains in a very perfect state. (Capitolin. Anton. Pius, 3, 5; Eckhel, vol. vii. p. 37.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Justi'nus Martyr (search)
Lucius the Philosopher" (we follow the common reading, not that of Eusebius), afterwards the emperor Verus, colleague of M. Aurelius. From the circumstance that " Verissimus" is not styled Caesar, which dignity he acquired in the course of A. D. 139, it is inferred by many critics, including Pagi, Neander, Otto, and Semisch, that the Apology was written previously, and probably early in that year. Eusebius places it in the fourth year of Antoninus, or the first year of the 230th Olympiad, A. D. 141, which is rather too late. Others contend for a later date still. Justin himself, in the course of the work (100.46), states that Christ was born a hundred and fifty years before he wrote, but he must be understood as speaking in round numbers. However,Tillemont, Grabe, Fleury, Ceillier, Maran, and others, fix the date of the work in A. D. 150. To this Apology of Justin are commonly subjoined three documents. (1.) *)Adrianou= u(pe\r *Xristianw=n e)pistolh/, Adriani pro Christianis Epistol
Peducaeus 8. M. Peducaeus Stolga Priscinus, consul A. D. 141, with T. loenius Severus.
ast year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must have been a consul suffectus. Sealiger, Tillemont, and Clinton, have proposed various emenldations on the text of Suidas, Clinton conjecturally assigning his birth to A. D. 47, and consequently his 78th year to A. D. 124. (Fasti Rom. pp. 31, 111). After all, the text of Suidas may be correct enough. He expressly says that the life of Philon was very long protracted, pare/teinen ei)s makro/n ; and regarding Hadrian all he says is, he wrote peri\ th=s basilei/as, not that
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philon Byblius (search)
ast year of which was A. D. 104. Now, granting that this is the year meant, it has been deemed highly mprobabie that he should have lived to chronicle the reign of Hadrian, who succeeded A. D. 117, when, according to this computation, Philon must have been 91 years old, especially as Hadrian reigned 21 years. The consulship of Herennius Severus unfortunately cannot aid us, for there is no consul of that name about this period ; there is a Catili is Severus, A. D. 120, and Haeniins Severus, A. D. 141, and Herennius must have been a consul suffectus. Sealiger, Tillemont, and Clinton, have proposed various emenldations on the text of Suidas, Clinton conjecturally assigning his birth to A. D. 47, and consequently his 78th year to A. D. 124. (Fasti Rom. pp. 31, 111). After all, the text of Suidas may be correct enough. He expressly says that the life of Philon was very long protracted, pare/teinen ei)s makro/n ; and regarding Hadrian all he says is, he wrote peri\ th=s basilei/as, not that