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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 2 2 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
areful education, and the most eminent rhetoricians of tire time, such as Scopelianus, Favorinus, Secundus, and Polemon, were among his teachers: he was instructed in the Platonic philosophy by Taurus Tyrius, and in the critical study of eloquence by Theagenes of Cnidus and Munatius of Tralles. After completing his studies, he opened a school of rhetoric at Athens, and afterwards at Rome also, where Marcus Aurelius, who ever after entertained a high esteem for him, was among his pupils. In A. D. 143 the emperor Antoninus Pius raised him to the consulship, together with C. Bellicins Torquatus; but as Atticus cared more for his fame as a rhetorician than for high offices, he afterwards returned to Athens, whither he was followed by a great number of young men, and whither L. Verus also was sent as his pupil by the emperor M. Aurelius. For a time Atticus was entrusted with the administration of the free towns in Asia; the exact period of his life when he held this office is not known, th
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith),
much the same position as that occupied by the younger Pliny in the time of Trajan. To his charge was committed the child, M. Annius Verus, known in history as the emperor M. Aurelius; subsequently he was selected as the preceptor of L. Commodus, who, when he assumed the purple, took the name of L. Verus, and he discharged his duties towards both pupils so much to the satisfaction of all concerned, that he was admitted into the senate, was nominated consul for the months of July and August A. D. 143, and five years afterwards was appointed proconsul of Asia, a distinction which he declined, on the plea of infirm health. Nor were his rewards confined to mere unsubstantial honours. From the gains of a lucrative profession, and the liberality of his royal patrons, he amassed considerable wealth, became proprietor of the celebrated gardens of Maecenas, acquired villas in different parts of Italy, and expended a large sum upon the erection of splendid baths. It is true that he speaks of hi
es derived for the most part from the ancient comic dramatists. The eighth book is entirely lost with the exception of the index, and a few lines at the beginning of the sixth were long wanting, until the deficiency was supplied from the Epitome of the Divine Institutions of Lactantius (100.28), first published in a complete form in 1712, by Pfaff, from a MS. in the loyal Library at Turin. [LACTANTIUS.] It is not probable that any portion of the Noctes Atticae was moulded into shape before A. D. 143, since, in the second chapter of the first book, Herodes Atticus is spoken of as " consulari honore praeditus," and the seventeenth chapter of the thirteenth book contains an allusion to the second consulship of Erucius Clarus, which belongs to A. D. 146. Editions The Editio Princeps of A. Gellius was printed at Rome, fol. 1469, by Sweynheym and Pannartz, with a prefatory epistle by Andrew, afterwards bishop of Aleria, to Pope Paul II.; was reprinted at the same place by the same typogr
nes (who was born B. C. 389), which seems mainly introductory, and to prove his position that the modern school was not entirely new, but had its origin so far back as the time of Aeschines. He passes immediately thereafter to the time of Nicetas, about A. D. 97, and the first book ends with Secundus, who was one of the instructors of Herodes Atticus, bringing the sophists in ten lives down to the same period as the sophistic philosophers. The second book begins with Herodes Atticus, about A. D. 143, and continues with the lives of his contemporaries and of their disciples, till the reign of Philip, about A. D. 247, as has been already stated. It consists of thirty-three lives, and ends with Aspasius. The principal value of this work is the opinion which it enables us to form of the merits of the parties treated of, as the taste of Philostratus, making allowance for his prepossessions as a rhetorician, is pure, and is confirmed by the remains we have of some of the productions to whic
nes (who was born B. C. 389), which seems mainly introductory, and to prove his position that the modern school was not entirely new, but had its origin so far back as the time of Aeschines. He passes immediately thereafter to the time of Nicetas, about A. D. 97, and the first book ends with Secundus, who was one of the instructors of Herodes Atticus, bringing the sophists in ten lives down to the same period as the sophistic philosophers. The second book begins with Herodes Atticus, about A. D. 143, and continues with the lives of his contemporaries and of their disciples, till the reign of Philip, about A. D. 247, as has been already stated. It consists of thirty-three lives, and ends with Aspasius. The principal value of this work is the opinion which it enables us to form of the merits of the parties treated of, as the taste of Philostratus, making allowance for his prepossessions as a rhetorician, is pure, and is confirmed by the remains we have of some of the productions to whic
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Torqua'tus, C. Belli'cius consul under Hadrian in A. D. 143 with Ti. Claudius Atticus Herodes. (Fasti)