hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 9 results in 8 document sections:

A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
l authorities of the period in which he lived state that he died at Rome. It is remarkable that the place of the death of a man so eminent should be thus doubtful. Melchior Adam (Vitae Germanor. Philosoph., ed. 3d, p. 7) states that Rudolphus Agricola heard him (A. D. 1476 or 1477) " Aristotelis scripta enarrantem ;" an obscure expression, but which, if founded in fact, shows that he must have at least paid a visit to Ferrara during or after his second residence at Rome. His death occurred A. D. 1478, when he must have been far advanced in years. Assessment The ability and learning of Theodore Gaza received the highest praise in his own and the succeeding age. His accurate acquaintance with the Latin language, and his ready and elegant employment of it, made it doubtful whether his Latin versions of Greek writers or his Greek versions of Latin writers were the more excellent. Hody has collected the eulogies passed upon him in prose and verse by many scholars, including Politian, Era
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Geo'rgius TRAPEZUNTIUS (search)
recompense of them perish too "): but the similarity of the story to an anecdote of Theodore Gaza destroys, or at least much impairs its credibility. George's son, Andreas Trapezuntius, in his prefatory address to Pope Sixtus IV., prefixed to George's translation of the Almagest of Ptolemy, declares that his life was shortened by the malignity of " his powerful enemy;" but who this enemy was Andreas does not mention. It could hardly have been Theodore Gaza, the rival of George, for he died A. D. 1478, while George himself did not die until A. D. 1485 or 1486, at the age of about 90. He was buried near his residence, in the Church of the Virgin Mary, formerly the Temple of Minerva at Rome, where was a monumental inscription in the floor of the church; but it had been so worn by the feet of the persons frequenting the church, that even in Allatius's time nothing was visible but the traces of the name. George of Trebizond left a son, Andreas or Andrew, who, during his father's lifetime,
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Joannes ARGYROPULUS (search)
hich had broken out in the former city : the time of his removal is not ascertained, but it was before 1471. At Rome he obtained an ample subsistence, by teaching Greek and philosophy, and especially by publicly expounding the works of Aristotle. He died at the age of seventy, from an autumnal fever, said to have been brought on by eating too freely of melons. But the year of his death is variously stated : all that appears to be certainly known is, that he survived Theodore Gaza, who died A. D. 1478. Fabricius states that he died A. D. 1480; but this date appears from the anecdote of his interview with Reuchlin to be too early. The attainments of Argyropulus were highly estimated in his own and the succeeding age. The love and reverence of his most eminent pupils, Lorenzo de' Medici, Poliziano, and Acciajuoli, is an honourable testimony to his character. Yet he has been severely censured; and is charged with gluttony, to which his corpulence is ascribed, and with drunkenness, as wel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Butler's attack on Drewry's Bluff. (search)
ar three thousand by official lists. They have about five hundred of my own men prisoners. General Heckman, who was captured in the fight, sends word that Gillmore could easily have gone in. They speak of the wire as a devilish contrivance which none but a Yankee could devise. Ransom's division was demoralized by their repulse. Butler, on May 27th, 1864, says: The number of Beauregard's wounded is 3040, which is considerably more than ours. We lost about 4500 in the two corps, of whom 1478 were missing. The Eighteenth Corps at Drewry's Bluff was composed of three and a half brigades stretched out in one thin line, with a mile of unguarded open country on its right. Against this force Beauregard brought seven brigades. It is the old story of masses thrown against a weak point. It is true that on this occasion the logical result did not follow, but the movement was skillfully planned, was as well carried out as circumstances would allow, and was a partial success. Beauregard
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Narvaez, Panfilo de 1478- (search)
Narvaez, Panfilo de 1478- Explorer; born in Valladolid, Spain, about 1478; went to Santo Domingo in 1501, and thence to Cuba, where he was the chief lieutenant of Velasquez, the governor. Cortez carrying matters with a high hand in Mexico, Narvaez was sent by Velasquez to Cuba to supersede him, but was defeated, lost an eye, and was held a prisoner by Cortez. On his release Narvaez returned to Spain, and in June, 1527, sailed from San Lucar, by authority of the King, with 600 men in five 1478; went to Santo Domingo in 1501, and thence to Cuba, where he was the chief lieutenant of Velasquez, the governor. Cortez carrying matters with a high hand in Mexico, Narvaez was sent by Velasquez to Cuba to supersede him, but was defeated, lost an eye, and was held a prisoner by Cortez. On his release Narvaez returned to Spain, and in June, 1527, sailed from San Lucar, by authority of the King, with 600 men in five vessels, commanded to conquer Florida and govern it. After long detention at Santo Domingo and Cuba, he sailed for Florida with 400 men and eighty horses, accompanied by Cabeza De Vaca (q. v.) as treasurer of the expedition, who was to be deputy-governor. They landed at Tampa Bay on April 13, 1528, where Narvaez raised the standard of Spain and took possession of the country in the name of its King, and his officers took the oath of allegiance to him as governor. Instead of treating the nat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
was killed at one of the Philippine Islands, by the natives, April 17, 1521. Only one of his ships, under Sebastian del Cano, reached Seville (the first ship to circumnavigate the globe)......Sept. 8, 1522 Verazzano, Giovanni de, Florentine navigator; born near Florence in 1470; died either at Newfoundland or Puerto del Rico in 1527. Explores for France the North American coast as far north as New York and Narraganset bays......1524 Gomez, Esteban, Spanish navigator, born in Spain in 1478 (?); died at sea in 1530 (?); explores the eastern coast perhaps as far north as Connecticut......1525 Ayllon, Lucas Vasquez de, Spanish explorer, died in Virginia......Oct. 18, 1526 [Sailing, with three vessels and 600 persons, with supplies for a colony, along the coast, he enters Chesapeake Bay and attempts a settlement near Jamestown, where he died. His colonists returned to Santo Domingo in the spring of 1527.] Pizarro, Francisco, Spanish adventurer; born in Spain about 1471; a
den and form a watertight joint. A mineral compound for uniting stone and resisting water is male by mixing 19 lbs. of sulphur with 42 lbs. of powdered glass or stone ware Over a gentle heat the sulphur melts, and the whole is stirred till a homogeneous mass is obtained, when it may be run into molds. It melts at 248° Fah., and becomes hard as stone, and will resist boiling at 230° Fah. It may be reformed indefinitely by remelting. See hydraulic cement, page 1144; mor-tar, b, pages 1477, 1478; and other compositions under various sub-heads: Alabaster, Granite, Hydraulic, Marble, Mastic, Mortar, State, Stone, article cement, pages 507, 508. See also artificial stone, where a number of compositions are cited which form good mortars and cements. Gang of stone-channeling chisels. Stone-chan′nel-ing ma-chine′. A machine for cutting gains or grooves in stone, usually in the quarry, but also applicable to dividing large blocks. The gang of chisels is operated by steam, and <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
eneral, May 1, 1861. Commanding brigade in Trans-Mississippi Department. William R. Calhoun. 1476. Born South Carolina. Appointed at Large. 27. Colonel, 1861, commanding First South Carolina (Regular) Artillery, Fort Sumter. Killed in duel, 1862 by Major Alfred Rhett, of same regiment. Robert Johnston. 1477. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia 28. Colonel, commanding Third Virginia Cavalry, Fitzhugh Lee's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, 1862. Thomas Bingham.* 1478. Born Pennsylvania. Appointed Pennsylvania. 29. William L. Cabell.* 1482. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 33. Brigadier-General, January 20, 1863. Commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Army of the West. James H. Wilson. 1483. Born Tennessee. Appointed Tennessee. 34. Lieutenant-Colonel Eighth Arkansas Infantry. Robert G. Cole. 1486. Born Virginia. Appointed at Large. 37. Lieutenant-Colonel, 1862, Chief Commissary of subsistence of Army of Northern Virg