Your search returned 24 results in 19 document sections:

1 2
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Articles conceived and determined for the Commission of the Merchants of this company resiant in Russia , and at the Warhouse, for the second voyage, 1555. the first of May, as followeth. (search)
Articles conceived and determined for the Commission of the Merchants of this company resiant in Russia , and at the Warhouse, for the second voyage, 1555. the first of May, as followeth. FIRST, the Governour, Consuls, Assistants and whole company assembled this day in open court, committeth and authorizeth Richard Gray and George Killingworth, jointly and severally to be Agents, Factors, and Atturneis generall and speciall, for the whole body of this companie, to buy, sel, trucke, change and permute al, and every kind and kindes of wares, marchandizes and goods to the said company appertaining, now laden & shipped in the good ship called the Edward Bonaventure, appointed for Russia , the same to utter and sell to the best commoditie, profit and advantage of the said corporation, be it for ready money, wares & marchandises, or truck, presently, or for time, as occasion & benefit of the company shal require and all such wares as they or either of them shal buy, trucke, or provide
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The letter of M. George Killingworth the companies first Agent in Moscovie, touching their interteinement in their second voyage. Anno 1555. the 27. of November in Mosco. (search)
The letter of M. George Killingworth the companies first Agent in Moscovie, touching their interteinement in their second voyage. Anno 1555. the 27. of November in Mosco. RIGHT worshipfull, my duetie considered, &c. It may please your worship to understand, that at the making hereof we all be in good health, thanks be to God, save onely William our cooke as we came from Colmogro fell into the river out of the boate, and was drowned. And the 11. day of September wee came to Vologda, and there we laide all our wares up, and sold very litle: but one marchant would have given us 12. robles for a broad cloth, & he said he would have had them all, and 4. altines for a pound of sugar, but we did refuse it because he was the first, and the marchants were not come thither, nor would not come before Winter, trusting to have more: but I feare it will not be much better. Yet notwithstanding we did for the best. And the house that our wares lie in costs from that day until Easter ten robles.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A copie of the first Privileges graunted by the Emperour of Russia to the English Marchants in the yeere 1555. (search)
A copie of the first Privileges graunted by the Emperour of Russia to the English Marchants in the yeere 1555. JOHN Vasilivich, by the grace of God Emperor of Russia, great duke of Novogrode, Moscovia, &c. To all people that shal see, reade, heare or understand these presents, greeting. Forasmuch as God hath planted al realmes and dominions in the whole world with sundry commodities, so as the one hath neede of the amity and commodities of the other, and by means therof traffike is used from one to another, and amity therby increased: and for that as amongst men nothing is more to be desired then amity, without the which no creature being of a naturall good disposition can live in quietnes, so that it is as troublesome to be utterly wanting, as it is perceived to be grievous to the body to lacke aire, fire, or any other necessaries most requisite for the conservation and maintenance thereof in health: considering also how needfull marchandize is, which furnisheth men of all that wh
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to the worshipfull M. William Sanderson, conteining a briefe discourse of that which passed in the Northeast discovery for the space of three and thirtie yeres. (search)
echingho, from whence they never returned, but all to the number of 70. persons perished, which was for want of experience to have made caves and stoves. These were found with the shippes the next Summer Anno 1554. by Russe fishermen: and in Anno 1555. the place sent unto by English Merchants as hereafter appeareth. Anno 1554. the sayd shippe Edward Bonadventure (although robbed homewardes by Flemings) returned with her company to London, shewing and setting foorth their entertainments and discovery of the countreys even to the citie of Mosco, from whence they brought a privilege written in Russe with the Kings or great Dukes seale, the other two shippes looked for and unknowen to them where they were. An. 1555. the said company of Merchants for discoverie upon a new supply, sent thither againe with two ships, to wit, the Edward Bonadventure, & another bearing the name of the King and Queene, Philip and Marie, whose Majesties by their letters to the said Moscovite, recommended
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage made by Master William Towrson Marchant of London, to the coast of Guinea, with two Ships, in the yeere 1555. (search)
The first voyage made by Master William Towrson Marchant of London, to the coast of Guinea, with two Ships, in the yeere 1555. UPON Munday the thirtieth day of September wee departed from the Isle of Wight, out of the haven of Neuport with two good shippes, the one called the Hart, the other the Hinde, both of London, and the Masters of them were John Ralph, and William Carter, for a voyage to bee made unto the River de Sestos in Guinea, and to other havens thereabout. It fell out by the varietie of windes, that it was the foureteenth day of October before wee coulde fetch Dartmouth : and being there arrived wee continued in that roade sixe dayes, and the 20. of October we warpt out of the haven, and set saile, directing our course towards the Southwest, and the next morning we were runne by estimation thirty leagues. The first of November we found ourselves to be in 31. degrees of latitude by the reckoning of our Master. This day we ranne about 40. leagues also. The sec
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
ustomes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. ROBERT TOMSON borne in the towne of Andover in Hampshire began his travaile out of England in An. 1553. in the moneth of March: who depares from S. Lucar, and there to stay till the said fleet should come thither: for that is continually their port to make stay at 6. or 8. daies, to take in fresh water, bread, flesh, & other necessaries. So that in the moneth of February in An. 1555. the sayde Robert Tomson with the said John Field and his companie, shipped themselves out of the towne of S. Lucar in a carvel of the citie of Cadiz , and within 6. dayes they arrived at the port of the Grand Canaria, where at our comming the shi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. (search)
The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. ROBERT TOMSON borne in the towne of Andover in Hampshire began his travaile out of England in An. 1553. in the moneth of March: who departing out of the citie of Bristoll in a good ship called The barke yong, in companie of other Marchants of the sayde citie, within 8. dayes after arrived at Lisbone in Portugall, es from S. Lucar, and there to stay till the said fleet should come thither: for that is continually their port to make stay at 6. or 8. daies, to take in fresh water, bread, flesh, & other necessaries. So that in the moneth of February in An. 1555. the sayde Robert Tomson with the said John Field and his companie, shipped themselves out of the towne of S. Lucar in a carvel of the citie of Cadiz , and within 6. dayes they arrived at the port of the Grand Canaria, where at our comming the shi
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
federates; 107 sick. Sent to the rear, 2388; fell into the hands of the enemy, 391; died in hospital, 121; left 206, of whom 126 were able to walk in the morning. Or take the totals treated in the field hospital alone for the first nine days of the campaign. Number admitted, 5257; sent to the rear, 4190; died in hospital, 179; fell into hands of the enemy, 787. Adding to this the number killed outright, not less than 1200, and the missing, a list we do not like to analyze, not less than 1555, makes a total loss in the Corps of more than 7000 men. And the casualties of the six weeks from the Rapidan to the James bring the total to 16,245. This is 3398 more than half the present for duty at the start. The records of the Medical Inspector of the Fifth Corps show the number admitted to the field hospitals alone from May 5th to June 19th to have been II,105 of the Corps, besides many from other corps and not a few Confederates. Reckoning the killed outright as 2200, and the miss
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cartier, Jacques 1494-1555 (search)
Cartier, Jacques 1494-1555 French navigator; Jacques Cartier. born at St. Malo, France, Dec. 31, 1494; was commissioned by Francis I., King of France, to command an expedition to explore the Western Continent. On April 20, 1534, after appropriate ceremonies in the cathedral at St. Malo, he sailed from that port with two ships, having each a crew of 120 men, and, after a prosperous voyage of twenty days, they arrived at Newfoundland. Sailing northward, he entered the Strait of Belle Ise la Roque on his way to the St. Lawrence. Cartier tried to induce him to turn back by giving him most discouraging accounts of the country, but he ordered the navigator to go back with him to the great river. Cartier disobeyed and sailed for France. The viceroy went above the site of Quebec, where he built a fort and spent the next winter in great suffering, returning to France in the autumn of 1543. Cartier had arrived the previous summer, and did not make another voyage. He died in 1555.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huguenots. (search)
h government and discipline, as well as doctrine, in an embodied confession of faith. The Huguenots were then so strong that they confidently expected to be the dominant party in the state in time. They included some of the royal family and many of the nobility. Among the latter was Gaspard de Coligni, admiral of France, a man respected by both parties, a brave and patriotic soldier and sailor, and for a while the favorite of the queen mother and regent of France, Catharine dea Medici. In 1555 he formed a project of a settlement for the persecuted Huguenots in America; and in that year Henry II. furnished two ships, commanded by the Chevalier de Villagagnon, who, with a small Protestant colony, sailed from Havre-de-Grace in May, 1555, and reached the bay of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in September. Coligni provided ministers for his colony, and in a synod that year, held at The Huguenots——Landing of John Ribault (from an old print). Geneva, of which Calvin was president, the chur
1 2