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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 25 25 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson). You can also browse the collection for 1582 AD or search for 1582 AD in all documents.

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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 40 (search)
days. The fourth year was denominated Bissextile, or leap year, because the sixth day before the calends, or first of March, was reckoned twice. The Julian year was introduced throughout the Roman empire, and continued in general use till the year 1582. But the true correction was not six hours, but five hours, forty-nine minutes; hence the addition was too great by eleven minutes. This small fraction would amount in one hundred years to three-fourths of a day, and in a thousand years to more than seven days. It had, in fact, amounted, since the Julian correction, in 1582, to more than seven days. Pope Gregory XIII., therefore, again reformed the calendar, first bringing forward the year ten days, by reckoning the 5th of October the 15th, and then prescribing the rule which has gradually been adopted throughout Christendom, except in Russia, and the Greek church generally. which had for some time become extremely confused, through the unwarrantable liberty which the pontiffs had taken