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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 25 25 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Commission given by sir Rowland Hayward knight, and George Barne, Aldermen and governours of the company of English Merchants, for discovery of new trades, unto Arthur Pet, and Charles Jackman, for a voyage by them to be made, for discovery of Cathay, 1580. in forme following. (search)
ly desire to discover) and seeing you are fully victualed for two yeres and upwards, which you may very wel make to serve you for two yeres and a halfe, though you finde no other help, you may therefore be the bolder to adventure in proceeding upon your discovery: which if you do, we doubt not, but you shall atchieve the Countrey of Cathay, & deliver to the prince there, one of her Majesties letters, bringing from thence the same princes letters answerable: and so in the yeere of our Lord 1582. returne home with good newes, and glad tidings, not onely unto us the adventurers in this voyage, but also to our whole Countrey and nation, which God graunt you may do, Amen. But if it happen that the land of Asia, from beyond the river Ob, extende it selfe Northwards to 80. degrees, or neerer the poole, whereby you finde it to leade you into that extremitie, that small or no hope may be looked for, to saile that way to Cathay, doe you notwithstanding followe the tract of the same land,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe discourse of the voyage of Sir Jerome Bowes knight, her Majesties ambassadour to Ivan Vasilivich the Emperour of Muscovia, in the yeere 1583. (search)
, by name Ivan Vasiliwich, having deliberately considered how necessary it were for the strengthening of his estate, that a sure commerce and entercourse of merchants should be againe renued betweene him and her sacred Majesty of England, with such further immunities and privileges for the honor and utility of both their dominions, and subjects of the same, as upon mutuall treatie of persons interposed on both sides, might be assented unto: sent over into this realme, in the yeere of our Lord 1582, as his ambassadour for that purpose, an ancient discreet gentleman of his householde called Pheodor Andrevich Phisemsky, accompanied with one of his Secretaries, for his better assistance in that expedition: and besides his many other directions, whereof part were to be delivered by word of mouth, and the rest set downe in a letter under the Emperours signature, addressed to her Majesty: he had in speciall charge to sollicit her Majesty to send over with him to his maister an ambassador fr
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The passeport made by the great Maister of Malta unto the Englishmen in the barke Raynolds. 1582. (search)
The passeport made by the great Maister of Malta unto the Englishmen in the barke Raynolds. 1582. FRIER HUGO of Loubeux Verdala, by the grace of God, master of the holy house, the hospital of S. John at Jerusalem, and an humble keeper of the poore of Jesus Christ, to all & every prince ecclesiastical & secular, archbishops, bishops, Dukes, Marqueses, Barons, Capteines, Vicelords, Maiors, Castellanes, Admirals, and whatsoever patrons of Gallies, or other greater shippes, and governors of cities, ey hold, and repute the said worshipfull John Keele in the name as abovesaid, the ship, mariners, and marchandize, without let in the same their voyage, or in any other place, that they be not molested, nor in any wise hindered, but that in all their causes and businesse they be of you holpen, and furthered continually. In witnesse whereof, our seale of government is impressed to these presents in blacke waxe. Given at Malta in our Convent, the twelfth of the moneth of July, in the yeere 1582.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Queenes Commission under her great seale, to her servant master William Hareborne, to be her majesties Ambassadour or Agent, in the partes of Turkie. 1582. (search)
The Queenes Commission under her great seale, to her servant master William Hareborne, to be her majesties Ambassadour or Agent, in the partes of Turkie. 1582. ELIZABETH, by the clemencie of the most good and most great God, the only creator and governour of all things, Queene of England, France, and Ireland , invincible, and most mightie defender of the true faith, against all Idolaters falsly professing the name of Christ, to all and singuler persons, to whose sight and view these our presf their traffique in those parts. Promising assuredly, and in the word of a Prince, that whatsoever shall be done of our sayd Orator and Agent, in all, or in any of the premisses, not repugnant and contrary to our lawes, shall be accepted, ratified, and confirmed by us. In witnesse whereof, we have caused these our letters to be made patents, and our seale thereunto to be appensed. Given at our Castle of Windsore, the 20. day of November, in the yeere of Christ 1582. and of our raigne the 24.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Queenes Letter to the great Turke 1582. written in commendation of Master Hareborne, when he was sent Ambassadour. (search)
The Queenes Letter to the great Turke 1582. written in commendation of Master Hareborne, when he was sent Ambassadour. ELIZABETH by the grace of the most mightie God and only creator of heaven and earth, of England, France, and Ireland Queene, the most invincible and most mighty defender of the Christian faith against all kind of idolatries of all that live among the Christians and falsly professe the name of Christ, unto the most Imperiall and most invincible prince, Sultan Murad Can, the most mighty ruler of the kingdom of Turkie, sole above all, and most soveraigne Monarch of the East Empire, greeting. Whereas at our request your Imperiall Majestie in the yeere of our Saviour Jesus 1580. hath entered into a league of peace with us, whereunto was united a most large & bountiful grant of certaine privileges, by benefite whereof our subjects may with all securitie most safely and freely travell by Sea and land into all and singular parts of your Musulmanlike Empire, and in the s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Letter of the Queenes Majestie to Alli Bassa the Turkes high Admirall, sent by her ambassadour M. William Hareborne, and delivered unto him aboord his gallie in the Arsenal. (search)
m omnes Angli subditi nostri possint versari : uti pro tenore literarum patentium a magno Caesare concessarum illis licere ex illarum conspectione perspicuum esse potest. Gratissimum ergo nobis excellentia vestra fecerit, si portuum omnium, aliorumque locorum, qui vestrae jurisdictioni parent, custodibus, item classium & navium praefectis omnibus mandare velit, ut Guilielmus iste, iliique Angli subditi nostri cum in illorum erunt potestate, amice & humaniter tractarentur. Quemadmodum nos vicissim omnes magni Caesaris subditos omni humanitatis genere tractabimus, si in Oceani maria, aliave loca venerint, quae nostro parent imperio. Postremo excellentiam vestram pro eo quem in nostros extendet favore iis omnibus officiis prosequemur, quae a gratissima principe in optime de se merentes debent proficisci. Bene & foeliciter valeas. Datum e castro nostro Windesorii die vicessimo mensis Novembris, Anno Jesu Christi salvatoris nostri 1582. Regni vero nostri vicessimo quarto.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe Remembrance of things to be indevoured at Constantinople, and in other places in Turkie, touching our Clothing and our Dying, and things that bee incident to the same, and touching ample vent of our natural commodities, & of the labour of our poore people withall, and of the generall enriching of this Realme: drawen by M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, and given to a friend that was sent into Turkie 1582. (search)
A briefe Remembrance of things to be indevoured at Constantinople, and in other places in Turkie, touching our Clothing and our Dying, and things that bee incident to the same, and touching ample vent of our natural commodities, & of the labour of our poore people withall, and of the generall enriching of this Realme: drawen by M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, and given to a friend that was sent into Turkie 1582. 1 ANILE wherewith we colour Blew to be brought into this realme by seed or roote. 2 And the Arte of compounding the same. 3 And also all other herbes used in dying in like maner to bee brought in. 4 And all Trees, whose Leaves, Seedes, or Barkes, or Wood doe serve to that use, to be brought into this realme by Seed or Roote. 5 All little Plants and Buskes serving to that use to be brought in. 6 To learne to know all earths and minerals forren used in dying, and their naturall places, for possible the like may here be found upon sight.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Remembrances for master S. to give him the better occasion to informe himselfe of some things in England, and after of some other things in Turkie, to the great profite of the Common weale of this Countrey. Written by the foresayd master Richard Hakluyt, for a principall English Factor at Constantinople 1582. (search)
Remembrances for master S. to give him the better occasion to informe himselfe of some things in England, and after of some other things in Turkie, to the great profite of the Common weale of this Countrey. Written by the foresayd master Richard Hakluyt, for a principall English Factor at Constantinople 1582. SINCE all men confesse (that be not barbarously bred) that men are borne as well to seeke the common commoditie of their Countrey, as their owne private benefite, it may seeme follie to perswade that point, for each man meaneth so to doe. But wherein men should seeke the common commoditie, and what way, and by what meane that is to bee brought about, is the point or summe of the matter, since every good man is ready to imploy his labour. This is to bee done by an infinite sort of meanes, as the number of things bee infinite that may bee done for common benefite of the Realme. And as the chiefe things so to bee done be divers, so are they to bee done by divers men, as they
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The firing and sinking of the stout and warre-like Carack called Las Cinque Llaguas, or, The five Wounds, by three tall Ships set foorth at the charges of the right honorable the Erle of Cumberland and his friends: Written by the discreet and valiant captaine M. Nicholas Downton. (search)
nd such other like combustible matter, for it flamed and ran over all the Carack at an instant in a maner. The Portugals lept over-boord in great numbers. Then sent I captaine Grant with the boat, with leave to use his owne discretion in saving of them. So he brought me aboord two gentlemen, the one an old man called Nuno Velio Pereira, which (as appeareth by the 4 chapter in the first booke of the woorthy history of Huighen de Linschoten) was governour of Mocambique and Cefala, in the yeere 1582. and since that time had bene likewise a governour in a place of importance in the East Indies. And the shippe wherein he was comming home was cast away a litle to the East of the Cape of Buona Speranza, and from thence he travelled over-land to Mocambique , and came as a passenger in this Carack. The other was called Bras Carrero, and was captaine of a Carack which was cast away neere Mocambique , and came likewise in this ship for a passenger. Also three men of the inferior sort we saved in
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
ut specially of their cruelties used to our Englishmen, and amongst the rest to him selfe for the space of 15. or 16. yeres together, until by good and happy meanes he was delivered from their bloody hands, and returned into his owne Countrey. An. 1582. Chap. 1. Wherein is shewed the day and time of our departure from the coast of England , with the number and names of the ships, their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of ooke shipping. And thus through the providence of Almighty God, after 16. yeeres absence, having sustained many and sundry great troubles and miseries, as by this discourse appeareth, I came home to this my native countrey of England in the yeere 1582. in the moneth of February, in the ship called the Landret, and arrived at Poole. The travailes of Job Hortop, which Sir John Hawkins set on land within the Bay of Mexico, after his departure from the Haven of S. John de Ullua in Nueva Espanna, t
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