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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 25 25 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 12 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 4 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Samuel Ball Platner, Thomas Ashby, A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1582 AD or search for 1582 AD in all documents.

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e of Pavia, is it probable, that the impoverished government could have sent forth another expedition? Did he relinquish the service of France for that of England? It is hardly a safe conjecture, 1527 that he was murdered in an encounter with savages, while on a voyage of discovery, which Henry VIII. had favored. Memoir of S. Cabot, 271—276. Hakluyt asserts, that Verrazzani was thrice on the coast of America, and that he gave a map of it to the English monarch. Hakl. Divers Voyages, 1582, quoted in Mem. of Cabot, p. 272. It is the common tradition, that he perished at sea, having been engaged in an expedition of which no tidings were ever heard. Such a report might easily be spread respecting a great navigator who had disappeared from the public view; and the rumor might be adopted by an incautious historian. It is probable, that Verrazzani had only retired from the fatigues of the life of a mariner; and, while others believed him buried in the ocean, he may have long enjoy