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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Agrippa, Fonteius 1. One of the accusers of Libo, A. D. 16, is again mentioned in A. D. 19, as offering his daughter for a vestal virgin. (Tac. Ann. 2.30, 86.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
on the exploits of Theseus, and calls him sidereus Pedo, on account of the sublimity of his style. (Ex. Pont. 4.16. 6.) Epic on Germanicus He is supposed to have written an epic poem on the exploits of Germanicus, the son of Drusus, of which twenty-three lines are preserved in the Suasoria of Seneca. (lib. i.) This fragment is usually entitled " De Navigatione Germanici per Oceanum Septentrionalem," and describes the voyage of Germanicus through the Amisia (Ems) into the northern ocean, A. D. 16. (Comp. Tac. Ann. 2.23.) Epigrams It would seem from Martial (5.5), that Albinovanus was also a writer of epigrams. L. Seneca was acquainted with him, and calls him fabulator elegantissimus. (Ep. 122.) Elegies attributed to Albinovanus Three Latin elegies are attributed to Albinovanus, but without any sufficient authority : namely,-- 1. Ad Liviam Aug. de Morte Drusi, which is ascribed to Ovid by many, and has been published separately by Bremer, Helmst. 1775. 2. In Obitum Maecenatis.
d to the military staff of Drusus (cohors Drusi), when the latter was sent to quell the revolt of the army in Germany, A. D. 14. Apronius was sent to Rome with two others to carry the demands of the mutineers; and on his return to Germany he served under Germanicus, and is mentioned as one of the Roman generals in the campaign of A. D. 15. On account of his services in this war he obtained the honour of the triumphal ornaments. (Tac. Ann. 1.29, 56, 72.) He was in Rome in the following year, A. D. 16 (2.32); and four years afterwards (A. D. 20), he succeeded Camillus, as proconsul, in the government of Africa. He carried on the war against Tacfarinas, and enforced military discipline with great severity. (3.21.) Hewas subsequently the propraetor of lower Germany, when the Frisii revolted, and seems to have lost his life in the war against them. (4.73, compared with 11.19.) Apronius had two daughters: one of whom was married to Plautius Silvanus, and was murdered by her husband (4.22); t
be allowed to leave their lines before they were attacked But he was overruled by Inguiomer, who led the impatient Germans to the assault. The result was what Arminius expected. As they were mounting the ramparts, they were suddenly met by a vigorous and steady charge along the whole line. They were routed and pursued with great slaughter, and the Romans made good their retreat to the Rhine. (Tac. Ann. 1.68.) The next year the Romans made no attempt on Germany; but on the following year, A. D. 16; they appeared on the left bank of the Weser. Arminius collected his own and the neighbouring tribes on the plain of Idistavisus, and there resolved to await Germanicus. (Tac. Ann. 2.16.) It was a winding plain between the river and the neighbouring hills. A forest clear of underwood was in the rear of the main body of the Germans. Arminius with his tribe occupied some rising ground on the flank; and he seems to have chosen his ground and disposed his men with ability. But the generalship o
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Vonones I. (search)
habits and manners produced general dislike among his subjects. They therefore invited Artabanus, king of Media, who also belonged to the family of the Arsacidae, to take possession of the kingdom. Artabanus was at first defeated, but afterwards drove Vonones out of Parthia, who then took refuge in Armenia, of which he was chosen king. But, threatened by Artabanus, he soon fled into Syria, in which province the Roman governor, Creticus Silanus, allowed him to reside with the title of king. (A. D. 16.) Two years afterwards he was removed by Germanicus to Pompeiopolis in Cilicia, partly at the request of Artabanus, who begged that he might not be allowed to reside in Syria, and partly because Germanicus wished to put an affront upon Piso, with whom Vonones was very intimate. In the following year (A. D. 19) Vonones attempted to escape from Pompeiopolis, intending to fly into Scythia; but he was overtaken on the banks of the river Pyramus, and shortly after put to death. According to Suet
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), or Artabanus III. (search)
Arsaces Xix. or Artabanus III. ARTABANUS III., obtained the Parthian kingdom on the expulsion of Vonones in A. D. 16. The possession of Armenia was the great cause of contention between him and the Romans; but during the life-time of Germanicus, Artabanus did not attempt to seize the country. Germanicus, on his arrival in Armenia in A. D. 18, recognized as king Zenon, the son of Polemon, whom the Armenians wished to have as their ruler, and who reigned under the name of Artaxias III.; and about the same time, Artabanus sent an embassy to Germanicus to renew the alliance with the Romans. (Tac. Ann. 2.56, 58.) After the death of Germanicus, Artabanus began to treat the Romans with contempt, placed Arsaces, one of his sons, over Armenia, and sent an embassy into Syria to demand the treasures which Vonones had carried with him out of Parthia. He also oppressed his subjects, till at length two of the chief men among the Parthians, Sinnaces, and the eunuch, Abdus, despatched an embassy t
. Ann. 3.4.) Vonones Erato was deposed by the Armenians after a short reign, and the throne remained vacant for several years, till the Armenians at length chose Vonones as their king, the son of Phraates IV., and the exiled king of Parthia. (A. D. 16.) Vonones maintained himself but one year on the throne, as he was compelled to fly into Syria through fear of Artabanus III., the king of Parthia. [ARSACES XVIII.] ARTAXIAS III. chosen king, A. D. 18, about two years after Vonones had fled i. Tigranes III. reestablished.--B. C. 2. Erato, queen. A. D. 2. Ariobarzanes, a Parthian prince, established by the Romans.--A. D. 4. Artavasdes III. or Artabases, his Son.--A. D. 5. Erato re-established ; death uncertain.-- .... Interregnum.--A. D. 16. Vonones.--A. D. 17. Interregnum.--A. D. 18. Zeno of Pontus, surnamed Artaxias.--... Tigranes IV., son of Alexander Herodes.--A. D. 35. Arsaces II. --A. D. 35. Mithridates of Iberia.--A. D. 51. Rhadamistus of Iberia.--A. D. 52. Tiridates I.--A.
Vonones Erato was deposed by the Armenians after a short reign, and the throne remained vacant for several years, till the Armenians at length chose Vonones as their king, the son of Phraates IV., and the exiled king of Parthia. (A. D. 16.) Vonones maintained himself but one year on the throne, as he was compelled to fly into Syria through fear of Artabanus III., the king of Parthia. [ARSACES XVIII.]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Catus, Fi'rmius a senator, was the accuser of Scribonius Libo Drusus in A. D. 16. A few years afterwards (A. D. 24), Catus was condemned by the senate to be banished to an island, on account of a false accusation of majestas which he brought against his sister; but in consequence of his former service in the accusation of Drusus, Tiberius remitted his banishment, but allowed him to be expelled from the senate. (Tac. Ann. 2.27, 4.31.)
CLEMENS (*Klh/mhs), a slave of Agrippa Postumus, whose person very much resembled his master's, and who availed himself of this resemblance, after the murder of the latter on the accession of Tiberius in A. D. 14, to personate the character of Agrippa. Great numbers joined him in Italy; he was generally believed at Rome to be the grandson of Tiberius ; and a formidable insurrection would probably have broken out, had not Tiberius contrived to have him apprehended secretly. The emperor did not venture upon a public execution, but commanded him to be slain in a private part of the palace. This was in A. D. 16. (Tac. Ann. 2.39, 40; D. C. 57.16; comp. Suet. Tib. 25
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