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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 10 Browse Search
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for 1608 AD or search for 1608 AD in all documents.

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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Narrative and legendary poems (search)
he marvels of the New. Well he knew the tricks of magic, And the lapstone on his knee Had the gift of the Mormon's goggles Or the stone of Doctor Dee. Dr. John Dee was a man of erudition, who had an extensive museum, library, and apparatus; he claimed to be an astrologer, and had acquired the reputation of having dealings with evil spirits, and a mob was raised which destroyed the greater part of his possessions He professed to raise the dead and had a magic crystal. He died a pauper in 1608. For the mighty master Agrippa Wrought it with spell and rhyme From a fragment of mystic moonstone In the tower of Nettesheim. To a cobbler Minnesinger The marvellous stone gave he,— And he gave it, in turn, to Keezar, Who brought it over the sea. He held up that mystic lapstone, He held it up like a lens, And he counted the long years coming By twenties and by tens. ‘One hundred years,’ quoth Keezar, “And fifty have I told: Now open the new before me, And shut me out the old!” Like
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes. (search)
ersons under the supposition that they were witches. He is said to have observed the day privately on each annual return thereafter. Note 11, page 244. Dr. John Dee was a man of erudition, who had an extensive museum, library, and apparatus; he claimed to be an astrologer, and had acquired the reputation of having dealings with evil spirits, and a mob was raised which destroyed the greater part of his possessions He professed to raise the dead and had a magic crystal. He died a pauper in 1608. Note 12, page 325. Eleonora Johanna Von Merlau, or, as Sewall the Quaker Historian gives it, Von Merlane, a noble young lady of Frankfort, seems to have held among the Mystics of that city very much such a position as Anna Maria Schurmaus did among the Labadists of Holland. William Penn appears to have shared the admiration of her own immediate circle for this accomplished and gifted lady. Note 13, page 330. Magister Johann Kelpius, a graduate of the University of Helmstadt, came to P