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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 10 Browse Search
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 1. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1608 AD or search for 1608 AD in all documents.

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pers were regularly chanted. France and the Roman religion had appropriated the soil of Maine. Meantime the remonstrances of French merchants had effected the revocation of the monopoly of De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields we1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adventurer, attended but by two Europeans, joined a mixed party of Hurons from Montreal, and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New York. He ascended the Sorel, and explored the lake which bears his name, and perpetuates his memory. The Huguenots had been active in plans of coloniza- 1610. tion. The death of Henry IV. deprived them of their po
had brought, he not only ascended the river as far as he could advance in boats, but struck into the in- Chap. IV.} 1607-8 terior. His companions disobeyed his instructions, and, being surprised by the Indians, were put to death. Smith himself,propitiate his power, should he be rescued from their hands. The decision of his fate was referred to Pow- Chap IV} 1607-8 hatan, who was then residing in what is now Gloucester county, on York River, at a village to which Smith was conducted throldest book printed on Virginia, in our Cambridge library. It is a thin quarto, in black letter, by John Smith printed in 1608—A True Relation of such occurrences and accidents of note, as hath hapned in Virginia since the first planting of that Colf the Chesapeake to the Susquehannah, and left only the borders of that remote river to remain for some years Chap. IV.} 1608. longer the fabled dwelling-place of a giant progeny. Burk, i. 123. He was the first to make known to the English the f
r chief—an error. of the company that died there; the ships which revisited the settlement with supplies, brought news of 1608. the death of the chief justice, the most vigorous friend of the settlement in England; and Gilbert, the sole in command an only of the principal men were detained a little longer in prison. The next spring the design was renewed. As if it 1608. had been a crime to escape from persecution, an unfrequented heath in Lincolnshire, near the mouth of the Humber, was theey were apprehended, it seemed impossible to punish and imprison wives and children for no other crime than Chap. VIII.} 1608. that they would not part from their husbands and fathers. They could not be sent home, for they had no homes to go to; she flight of Robinson and Brewster, and their followers, from the land of their fathers. Their arrival in Amsterdam, in 1608, was but the beginning of their wanderings. They knew they were Pilgrims, and looked not much on those things, but lifted