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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 32 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 10 10 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 5 5 Browse Search
M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 1 1 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1609 AD or search for 1609 AD in all documents.

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number and importance of the fishing stages had increased; in 1578 there were one 1578 hundred and fifty French vessels at Newfoundland, and regular voyages, for traffic with the natives, began to be successfully made. One French mariner, before 1609, had made more than forty voyages to the American coast. The purpose of founding a French empire in America was renewed, and an ample commission 1596. was issued to the Marquis'de la Roche, a nobleman of Chap. I.} Brittany. Yet his enterprisewho aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adventurer, attended but by two Europeans, joined a mixed party of Hurons from Montreal, and Algonquins from Quebec, in an expedition against the Iroquois, or Five Nations, in the north of New York. He ascended the Sorel, and explored the lake w
distance from the mouth of the Mississippi the sea is not salt, so great is the volume of fresh water which the river discharges. Following, for the most part, the coast, it was more than fifty days before the men, who finally escaped, now no more than three hundred and eleven in number, on the tenth of September entered Sept. 10. the River Panuco. On Soto's expedition, by far the best account is that of the Portuguese Eye-witness, first published in 1557, and by Hakluyt, in English, in 1609. In the history of Vega, numbers and distances are magnified, and every thing embellished; it must be consulted with extreme caution. Buckingham Smith, in his Coleccion para la Historia de la Florida, has published the original in Spanish of the report of Luis Hernandez de Biedma, of which there is a French translation in Ternaux-Compans, XX. 81. Of books published in America, compare Belknap, in Am. Biog. i. 185—195; McCulloh, Researches, Appendix, III. 523—531; Nuttall, in his Travels i
anticipations of the London company had not been realized. But the cause of failure appeared in the policy, which had grasped at sudden emoluments; Smith, in III. Mass. Hist. Coll. III. 10—12. the enthusiasm of the English seemed Chap. IV.} 1609. exalted by the train of misfortunes; and more vast and honorable plan Hakluyt's Dedication of Virginia richly valued, v. were conceived, which were to be effected by more numerous and opulent associates Not only were the limits of the colony eunt, in Purchas, IV. 1735—1738. True Declaration of Virginia 21—26. separated the admiral from the rest of his fleet; and his vessel was stranded on the rocks of the Bermudas. A small ketch perished; an Smith, i. 234. seven ships Chap. IV.} 1609. only arrived in Virginia. A new dilemma ensued. The old charter was abrogated; and, as there was in the settlement no one who had any authority from the new patentees, anarchy seemed at hand. The emigrants of the last arrival were dissolute <
Chapter VII Colonization of Maryland. the limits of Virginia, by its second charter, ex- Chap. VII.} 1609. tended two hundred miles north of Old Point Comfort, and therefore included all the soil which subsequently formed the state of Maryland. It was not long before the country towards the head of the Chesapeake was explored; settlements in Accomack were extended; and commerce was begun with the tribes which Smith had been the first to visit. Porey, the secretary of the colony, made a discovery into the 1621. great bay, as far as the River Patuxent, which he ascended; but his voyage probably reached no farther to the north. The English settlement of a hundred men, which he is represented to have found already established, Chalmers, 206. was rather a consequence of his voyage, and seems to have been on the eastern shore, perhaps within the limits of Virginia. Purchas, IV. 1784. Smith, II. 61—64. The hope of a very good trade of furs, animated the adventurers; and if
thers. Their arrival in Amsterdam, in 1608, was but the beginning of their wanderings. They knew they were Pilgrims, and looked not much on those things, but lifted up their eyes to heaven, their dearest country, and quieted their spirits. In 1609, removing to 1609. Leyden, they saw poverty coming on them like an armed man; but, being careful to keep their word and painful and diligent in their callings, they attained a comfortable condition, grew in the gifts and grace of the Spirit of Go1609. Leyden, they saw poverty coming on them like an armed man; but, being careful to keep their word and painful and diligent in their callings, they attained a comfortable condition, grew in the gifts and grace of the Spirit of God, and lived together in peace and love and holiness. Never, said the magistrates of the city, never did we have any suit or accusation against any of them; and, but for fear of offending King James, they would have met with public favor. Many came there from different parts of England, so as they grew a great congregation. Such was the humble zeal and fervent love of this people towards God and his ways, and their single-heartedness and sincere affection one towards another, that they seemed