Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1620 AD or search for 1620 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allouez, Claude Jean, 1620- (search)
Allouez, Claude Jean, 1620- One of the earliest French missionaries and explorers of the country near the Great Lakes; born in 1620. After laboring among the Indians on the St. Lawrence several years, he penetrated the Western wilds and established a mission on the western shores of Lake Michigan, where he heard much about the Mississippi River, and made notes of what he learned concerning it. He explored Green Bay, and founded a mission among the Foxes, Miamis, and other tribes there. A 1620. After laboring among the Indians on the St. Lawrence several years, he penetrated the Western wilds and established a mission on the western shores of Lake Michigan, where he heard much about the Mississippi River, and made notes of what he learned concerning it. He explored Green Bay, and founded a mission among the Foxes, Miamis, and other tribes there. A mission begun by Marquette at Kaskaskia, Ill., Allouez sought to make his permanent field of labor; but when La Salle, the bitter opponent of the Jesuits, approached in 1679, he retired. Returning to the Miamis on the St. Joseph's River, he labored for a while, and died, Aug. 27, 1689. The contributions of Father Allouez to the Jesuit relations are most valuable records of the ideas and manners of the Indians.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
ipling, Yorkshire, Eng.; was graduated at Oxford; travelled on the Continent; became secretary of Robert Cecil; married Anne Minne in 1604; was a clerk of the privy council; was knighted in 1617; became a secretary of state soon afterwards, and in 1620 was granted a pension of $5,000 a year. When, in 1624, he publicly avowed himself a Roman Catholic, he resigned his office, but King James retained him in the privy council; and a few days before that monarch's death he was created Baron of Baltimore in the Irish peerage. Calvert had already entered upon a colonizing scheme. In 1620 he purchased a part of Newfoundland, and was invested with the privileges and honors of a count-palatine. He called his new domain Avalon, and, after spending about $100,000 in building warehouses there, and a mansion for himself, he went thither in 1627. He returned to England the following spring. In the spring of 1629 he went again to Avalon, taking with him his wife and unmarried children. The foll
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Arthur, (search)
Barlow, Arthur, Navigator; born about 1550; died about 1620. See Amidas.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradford, William, 1588-1657 (search)
One of Mr. Robinson's congregation at Leyden, he accompanied the Pilgrims to America, and was one of the foremost in selecting a site for the colony. Before the Pilgrims landed, his wife fell into the sea from the Mayflower, and was drowned. He succeeded John Carver (April 5, 1621) as governor of Plymouth colony. He cultivated friendly relations with the Indians; and he was annually rechosen governor as long as he lived, excepting in five years. He wrote a history of Plymouth colony from 1620 to 1647, which was published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1856. He died in Plymouth, Mass., May 9, 1657. printer; born in Leicester, England, in 1658. A Friend, or Quaker, he came to America with Penn's early colonists in 1682. and landed near the spot where Philadelphia was afterwards built. He had learned the printer's trade in London, and, in 1686, he printed an almanac in Philadelphia. Mixed up in a political and social dispute in Pennsylvania, and suffering thereb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brownists, (search)
t Brown. The sect sprang up towards the close of the sixteenth century. As early as 1580, Brown began to inveigh against the ceremonies of the Church of England. Being opposed by the bishops, he and his congregation left England, and settled in Zealand, where they formed a church upon a model to suit themselves. The seed he had planted in England grew so abundantly that at the close of the century there were about 20,000 Brownists in the realm. Of that sect were Rev. Mr. Robinson, Elder Brewster, and the congregation at Leyden in 1620. The founder of this sect was born about the year 1550, and died about 1630. His family were closely connected with Cecil, afterwards Lord Burleigh. Educated at Cambridge, as soon as he left college he began a vigorous opposition to the whole discipline and liturgy of the Established Church. He taught that all the members of a church were equal, and that the pastor should be chosen by the congregation. See Bradford. William: The First Dialogue.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Champlain, Samuel de 1567-1635 (search)
r furious and tumultuous assault upon the palisades, they were thrown back in confusion, and could not be induced to repeat the onset, but resolved to retreat. Champlain, wounded in the leg, was compelled to acquiesce, and he made his way back to Quebec (1616), after a year's absence. The same year he went to France and organized a. fur-trading company. On his return to Canada he took with him some Recollet priests to minister to the colonists and the pagans. The colony languished until 1620, when a more energetic viceroy gave it a start. Champlain got permission to fortify it, and he returned with the title and power of governor, taking with him his child-wife. Jesuit priests were sent to Canada as missionaries, and Champlain worked energetically for the cause of religion and the expansion of French dominion. In 1628 Sir David Kertk appeared with an English fleet before Quebec and demanded its surrender. Champlain's bold refusal made Kertk retire, but on his way down the St.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
ly in cheap trinkets, and in 1623 thirty families from Holland landed there and began a settlement. Then were laid the foundations of the State of New York, as New Netherland was called after it passed into the possession of the English. Late in 1620 a company of English Puritans (Puritans) who had fled from persecution to Holland, crossed the Atlantic and landed on the shores of Massachusetts, by permission of the Plymouth Company (see Plymouth Company). They built a town and called it New Plymouth; they organized a civil government and called themselves Pilgrims. Others came to the shores of Massachusetts soon afterwards, and tile present foundations of the State of Massachusetts were laid at Plymouth in 1620 (Pilgrim fathers). In 1622 the Plymouth Company granted to Mason and Gorges a tract of land bounded by the rivers Merrimac and Kennebec, the ocean, and the St. Lawrence River, and fishermen settled there soon afterwards. Mason and Gorges dissolved their partnership in 1629,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cromwell, Oliver 1599- (search)
cal families. It is a curious fact that when he was five years of age he had a fight with Prince Charles, who, as king, was beheaded and succeeded by Cromwell as the ruler of England. He flogged the young prince, who was then with his family visiting Cromwell's uncle. As a boy he was much given to robbing orchards and playing unpleasant pranks. He lived a wild life at Sidney-Sussex College, Cambridge, whither he was sent in 1616. He left college after his father's death next year, and in 1620 married a daughter of Sir James Bourchier, when his manner of life changed, and he became an earnest Christian worker for good, praying, preaching, and exhorting among the Puritans. He became a member of Parliament in 1628, and always exercised much influence in that body. He was a radical in opposition to royalty in the famous Long Parliament. When the civil war began he became one of the most active of the men in the field, and was made a colonel in 1643 under the Earl of Essex, the p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dale, Sir Thomas, (search)
Dale, Sir Thomas, Colonial governor; was a distinguished soldier in the Low Countries, and was knighted by King James in 1606. Appointed chief magistrate of Virginia, he administered the government on the basis of martial law; planted new settlements on the James, towards the Falls (now Richmond); and introduced salutary changes in the land laws of the colony. He conquered the Appomattox Indians. In 1611 Sir Thomas Gates succeeded him, but he resumed the office in 1614. In 1616 he returned to England; went to Holland; and in 1619 was made commander of the East India fleet, when, near Bantam, he fought the Dutch. He died near Bantam, East Indies, early in 1620.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dermer, Thomas, (search)
He sent home his ship from Mohegan Island, laden with fish and furs, and, leaving Squanto at Saco, sailed southward. Near Cape Cod he was captured by Indians, but ransomed himself by a gift of some hatchets. Passing Martin's (Martha's) Vineyard, he navigated Long Island Sound by the help of an Indian pilot, the first Englishman who had sailed upon these waters, and passed out to sea at Sandy Hook. Going through Hell Gate he lost an anchor in the dangerous cataract, and the current was so swift that he did not stop at Manhattan; but on his return from Virginia (1620) he touched there and held a conference with some Dutch traders on Hudson's River. Dermer took occasion to warn the Dutch that they were on English territory, when they replied that they found no Englishmen there, understood no such thing, and hoped they had not offended. Dermer sent a journal of his proceedings to Gorges, and thus, no doubt, hastened the procurement of the new charter for the Plymouth Company (q. v.).
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