Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1624 AD or search for 1624 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
Baltimore, Lords. I. George Calvert, Born about 1580, at Kipling, Yorkshire, Eng.; was graduated at Oxford; travelled on the Continent; became secretary of Robert Cecil; married Anne Minne in 1604; was a clerk of the privy council; was knighted in 1617; became a secretary of state soon afterwards, and in 1620 was granted a pension of $5,000 a year. When, in 1624, he publicly avowed himself a Roman Catholic, he resigned his office, but King James retained him in the privy council; and a few days before that monarch's death he was created Baron of Baltimore in the Irish peerage. Calvert had already entered upon a colonizing scheme. In 1620 he purchased a part of Newfoundland, and was invested with the privileges and honors of a count-palatine. He called his new domain Avalon, and, after spending about $100,000 in building warehouses there, and a mansion for himself, he went thither in 1627. He returned to England the following spring. In the spring of 1629 he went again to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dutch West India Company. (search)
zed on June 21, 1623; and with such a charter, such powers, and such privileges, it began the settlement and development of New Netherland. The English claimed the domain, and the Dutch hastened to acquire eminent domain, according to the policy of England, by planting permanent settlements there; and the same year (1623) they sent over thirty families, chiefly Walloons, to Manhattan. The management of New Netherland was intrusted to the Amsterdam chamber. Their traffic was successful. In 1624 the exports from Amsterdam, in two ships, were worth almost $10,000, and the returns from New Netherland were considerably more. The company established a trading-post, called Fort Orange, on the site of Albany, and traffic was extended eastward to the Connecticut River, and even to Narraganset Bay; northward to the Mohawk Valley, and southward and westward to the Delaware River and beyond. To induce private capitalists to engage in the settlement of the country, the company gave lands and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fine Arts, the. (search)
of the Arts of Design in the United States. In 1622 Edward Palmer, a native of Gloucestershire, England, obtained from the London Company a grant of land in Virginia, and from the Plymouth Company a tract in New England. Mr. Palmer died late in 1624. Just before his death he made provision in his will for the establishment, conditionally, of a university in Virginia, with which was to be connected a school of fine arts. His will, dated Nov. 22 (O. S.), 1624, provided for the descent of his 1624, provided for the descent of his lands in Virginia and New England to his sons and nephews, saying: But if all issue fails, then all said land is to remain for the founding and maintenance of a university and such schools in Virginia as shall there be erected, and the university shall be called Academia Virginiensis Oxoniensis. After providing for scholarships in the university for the male descendants of his grandfather, Mr. Palmer's will provided that the scholars of the said university, for the avoiding of idleness, shall
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fox, George 1624-1691 (search)
Fox, George 1624-1691 Founder of the Society of Friends, or Quakers; born in Drayton, Leicestershire, England, in July, 1624. His father, a Presbyterian, was too poor to give his son an education beyond reading and writing. The son, who George Fox. was grave and contemplative in temperament, was apprenticed to a shoemaker, and made the Scriptures his constant study. The doctrines he afterwards taught were gradually fashioned in his mind, and believing himself to be called to disseminate them, he abandoned his trade at the age of nineteen, and began his spiritual work, leading a wandering life for some years, living in the woods, and practising rigid self-denial. He first appeared as a preacher at Manchester, in 1648, and he was imprisoned as a disturber of the peace. Then he travelled over England, meeting the same fate everywhere, but gaining many followers. He warmly advocated all the Christian virtues, simplicity in worship, and in manner of living. Brought before a ju
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Friends, Society of (search)
Friends, Society of Otherwise known as Quakers, claim as their founder George Fox (q. v.), an Englishman; born in Drayton, Leicestershire, in 1624. The first general meeting of Friends was held in 1668, and the second in 1672. Owing to the severe persecution which they suffered in England, a number of them came to America in 1656, and landed at Boston, whence they were later scattered by persecution. The first annual meeting in America is said to have been held in Rhode Island in 1661. It was separated from the London annual meeting in 1683. This meeting was held regularly at Newport till 1878, since when it has alternated between Newport and Portland, Quaker Exhorter in colonial New England. Me. Annual meetings were founded in Maryland in 1672, in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1681, in North Carolina in 1708, and in Ohio in 1812. The Friends have no creed, and no sacraments. They claim that a spiritual baptism and a spiritual communion without outward signs are all
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gorges, Sir Ferdinando 1565-1647 (search)
repeated the voyage. The new charter obtained by the company created such a despotic monopoly that it was strongly opposed in and out of Parliament, and was finally dissolved in 1635. Gorges had, meanwhile, prosecuted colonization schemes with vigor. With John Mason and others he obtained grants of land (1622), which now compose a part of Maine and New Hampshire, and settlements were attempted there. His son Robert was appointed general governor of the country, and a settlement was made (1624) on the site of York, Me. After the dissolution of the company (1635), Gorges, then a vigorous man of sixty years, was appointed (1637) governorgeneral of New England, with the powers of a palatine, and prepared to come to America, but was prevented by an accident to the ship in which he was to sail. He made laws for his palatinate, but they were not acceptable. Gorges enjoyed his viceregal honors a few years, and died in England in 1647. His son Robert had a tract of land bestowed upon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jogues, Isaac 1607- (search)
Jogues, Isaac 1607- Missionary; born at Orleans, France, Jan. 10, 1607; became a Jesuit at Rouen in 1624; was ordained in 1636; and, at his own request, was immediately sent to Canada. He was a most earnest missionary among the Indians on both sides of the Lakes. Caught, tortured, and made a slave by the Mohawks, he remained with them until 1643, when he escaped to Albany, and was taken to Manhattan. Returning to Europe, he was shipwrecked on the English coast. He returned to Canada in 1646, where he concluded a treaty between the French and the Mohawks. Visiting Lake George, he named it St. Sacrament, and, descending the Hudson River to Albany, he went among the Mohawks as a missionary, who seized and put him to death as a sorcerer, at Caughnawaga, N. Y., Oct. 18, 1646.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nicolls, Sir Richard 1624-1672 (search)
Nicolls, Sir Richard 1624-1672 Royal governor; born in Ampthill, England, in 1624; was one of the royal commissioners to inquire into the state of the English-American colonies, and to seize the province of New Netherland (q. v.). Nicolls conducted the administration of affairs both in New York and New Jersey with prudence and moderation; resigned the government of New Jersey to Carteret in 1666, and was succeeded in the government of New York in 1667 by Colonel Lovelace. He died at sea, Mir Richard 1624-1672 Royal governor; born in Ampthill, England, in 1624; was one of the royal commissioners to inquire into the state of the English-American colonies, and to seize the province of New Netherland (q. v.). Nicolls conducted the administration of affairs both in New York and New Jersey with prudence and moderation; resigned the government of New Jersey to Carteret in 1666, and was succeeded in the government of New York in 1667 by Colonel Lovelace. He died at sea, May 28, 1672.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oldham, John 1600- (search)
e consultations of the governor with his council. It was soon discovered that Lyford and Oldham were plotting treason against the Church and State. Several letters written by Lyford to the London partners, breathing sedition, were discovered by Bradford as they were about to be sent abroad. The governor kept quiet for a while, but when Lyford set up a separate congregation, with a few of the colonists whom he had seduced, and held meetings on the Sabbath, Bradford summoned a General Court (1624), before whom the offending clergyman and his companions were arraigned on a charge of seditious correspondence. They denied the accusation, when they were confronted by Lyford's letters, in which he defamed the settlers, advised the London partners to prevent Robinson and the rest of his congregation coming to America, as they would interfere with his church schemes, and avowed his intention of removing the stigma of schism by a regularly organized church. A third conspirator had written
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porey, John (search)
much in love with the pot to be much esteemed. At about the same time another wrote of Porey: He must have both meat and money; for drink he will find out himself, if it be above ground, or no deeper than the cellar. Porey was made secretary of the Virginia colony in 1619, but, on account of his exactions, was recalled in 1622. Early in that year he, with some friends, penetrated the country southward beyond the Roanoke River, with a view to making a settlement (see State of North Carolina). On his arrival in London, Porey joined the disaffected members of the London Company, which so excited the mind of the King against the corporation that, in 1624, he deprived them of their charter. He had been sent early in that year as one of the commissioners to inquire into the state of the Virginia colony, and while there he bribed the clerk of the council to give him a copy of their proceedings, for which offence the poor scribe was made to stand in the pillory and lose one of his ears.
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