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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 111 111 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 29 29 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 14 14 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 10 10 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 5 5 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 5 5 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 5 5 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1642 AD or search for 1642 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 5 document sections:

37,ibid.227. 1639,ibid.229—230. 1640,Hening, i.268. 1641, June,ibid.259—262. 1642, January,ibid.267. 1642, April,ibid.230. 1642, June,ibid.269. Considering1642, April,ibid.230. 1642, June,ibid.269. Considering how imperfect are the early records, it is surprising that so considerable a list can be established. The instructions to Sir William Berkeley do not first order as1642, June,ibid.269. Considering how imperfect are the early records, it is surprising that so considerable a list can be established. The instructions to Sir William Berkeley do not first order assemblies; but speak of them as of a thing established. At an adjourned session of Berkeley's first legislature, the assembly declares its meeting exceeding customaryll presently be explained. It was in February, 1642, that Sir William Berke- 1642. icy, arriving in the colony, assumed the government. His arrival must have beere of the legislative authority; and he confirmed them in the enjoy Chap. VI.} 1642 Mar ment of franchises which a long and uninterrupted succession had rendered fade to the laws and customs of England. Religion was provided for; the law about 1642 land-titles adjusted; an amicable treaty with Maryland successfully matured; and
Deputy Governor. Commerce also was fostered; and tobacco, the staple of the colony, subjected to inspection. Nor was it long before the inhabitants recognized 1642. Mar. 21. Lord Baltimore's great charge and solicitude in maintaining the government, and protecting them in their persons, rights, and liberties; and therefore, o49. But secret dangers existed. The aborigines, alarmed at the rapid increase of the Europeans, vexed at being frequently overreached by their cupidity, com- 1642 to 1644. menced hostilities; for the Indians, ignorant of the remedy of redress, always plan retaliation. After a war of frontier aggressions, marked by no decisi. Hammond, 20. An equal union prevailed between all branches of 1650 April the government in explaining and confirming the civil liberties of the colony. In 1642, Robert Vaughan, in the name of the rest of the burgesses, had desired, that the house might be separated, and thus a negative secured to the representatives of th
forms of discipline which had been sanctioned by the English parliaments in the reign of Edward; the Puritans, on the contrary, endeavored to sweeten exile by a complete emancipation from ceremonies which they had reluctantly observed. The sojourning in Frankfort was imbittered by the anger of consequent divisions; but Time, the great calmer of the human passions, softened the asperities of controversy; and a reconciliation of the two parties was prepared by concessions Ibid., edition of 1642, p. 160, 161, 162, 163. We will joyne with you to be suitors for the reformation and abolishing of all offensive ceremonies. Prince, 287, 288. to the Puritans. For the circumstances of their abode on the continent were well adapted to strengthen the influence of the stricter sect. While the companions of their exile Chap. VIII.} had, with the most bitter intolerance, been rejected by Denmark and Northern Germany, Planck's Geschichte des Protestantischen Lehrbegriffs, b. v. t. II. p. 3
te. The records refute Winthrop's statement. to the settlement of Roger Williams, and from thence joined her friends on the island, sharing with them the hardships of early emigrants. Gorton, in Hutchinson, i. 73. Her powerful mind still continued its ac- Chap. IX.} tivity; young men from the colonies became converts to her opinions; and she excited such admiration, that to the leaders in Massachusetts it gave cause of suspicion of witchcraft. Winthrop, II. 9. She was in a few years 1642. left a widow, but was blessed with affectionate children. A tinge of fanaticism pervaded her family. one of her sons, and Collins her son-in-law, had ventured to expostulate with the people of Boston on the 1641. wrongs of their mother. But would the Puritan magistrates of that day tolerate an attack on their government? Ibid. II. 39. Severe imprisonment for many months was the punishment inflicted on the young men for their boldness. Rhode Island itself seemed no longer a safe place
reasurer of the public revenue, chancellors, and a master of the ordnance, and every thing that the worthy old man deemed essential to his greatness. Sir Ferdinand1642. Mar. 1. had travailed in the cause above forty years, and expended above twenty thousand pounds; yet all the regalia which Thomas Gorges, his trusty and wellbelovugh for the scanty furniture of a cottage. Agamenticus, though in truth but a poor village, Winthrop, II. 100. soon became a chartered borough; like Chap X.} 1642 Mar. 1. another Romulus, the veteran soldier resolved to perpetuate his name, and, under the name of Gorgeana, the land round York became as good a city as seals abeen guiltless of blood; and causes were already in action which were fast substituting the firmness and the charity of intelligence for the severity of religious 1642. bigotry. It was ever the custom, and it soon became the law, in Puritan New England, that none of the brethren shall suffer so much barbarism in their families, a