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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 165 AD or search for 165 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
\ *Spe/rmatos, De Semine (vol. iv.). 13. *Peri\ *Xrei/as tw=n e)n *)Anqrw/pon *Sw/mati *Mori/wn, De Usu Partium Corporis Humani, in seventeen books (vols. iii. and iv.). This is Galen's principal physiological work, and was probably begun about A. D. 165 (Gal. De Libr Propr. 100.2. vol. xix. p. 15, 16), and finished after the year 170. (Ibid. p. 20.) It is no less admirable for the deep religious feeling with which it is written, than for the scientific knowledge and acuteness displayed in it; Hippocratis et Platonis Decretis (vol. v.). This is a philosophical and controversial work, directed against Chrysippus, and others of the old philosophers, and containing at the same time much physiological matter. It was begun probably about A. D. 165, and finished about the year 170. 138. *Te/xnh *)Iatrikh/, Ars Medica (vol. i.). It is often called in old editions and MSS. Ars Parca, to distinguish it from Galen's longer work, De Methodo Medendi ; and this title is not unfrequently corrupte
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Justi'nus Martyr (search)
ount of his martyrdom, and thinks his execution was secret, so that the date and manner of it were never known: the Greek Menaea (a. d. 1 Junii) state that he drank hemlock. His death is generally considered to have taken place in the persecution under the emperor Marcus Antoninus; and the Chronicon Paschale, (vol.i. p. 258, ed. Paris, 207, ed. Venice, 482, ed Bonn), which is followed by Tillemont, Baronius, Pagi, Otto, and other moderns, places it in the consulship of Orphitus and Pudens, A. D. 165; Dupin and Semisch place it in A. D. 166, Fleury in A. D. 167, and Tillemont and Maran in A. D. 168. Papebroche (Acta Sanctorum, April. vol. ii. p. 107), assigning the Apologia Secunda of Justin to the year 171, contends that he must have lived to or beyond that time. Dodwell, on the contrary, following the erroneous statement of Eusebius in his Chronicon, places his death in the reign of Antoninus Pius; and Epiphanius, according to the present reading of the passage already referred to, w
saction recorded and the date of the *Pro\s a)pai/deuton. But that piece can be shown to have been written shortly after the extraordinary suicide of Peregrinus, A. D. 165; for in § 14 Lucian mentions another silly fellow who had just recently purchased (*Xqe\s kai\ prw/hn) the stick of the fanatical cynic for a talent. Now Epictetccasional travel; since it appears from the *Pw=s dei= i(st. sug., § 14, that he must have been in Achaia and lolnia about the close of the Parthian war, A. D. 160-165; on which occasion, too, he seems to have visited Olympia, and beheld the self-immolation of Peregrinus. We have already seen that about the year 170, or a little pda-fé of Peregrinus Proteus, a fanatical cynic and apostate Christian, who publicly burnt himself from an impulse of vain-glory shortly after the 236th Olympiad (A. D. 165), and concerning whom further particulars will be found elsewhere. [PEREGRINUs.] Lucian seems to have belleld this singular triumph of fanaticism with a sort of
Marcia'nus (*Martiano/s), a physician at Rome, who enjoyed a great reputation as an anatomist in the second century after Christ, and wrote some works on that subject, which are now lost. Galen became personally acquainted with him during his first visit to Rome, about A. D. 165, and tells an anecdote of him which shows him to have been an envious and malicious person (De Praenot. ad Epig). 100.3, vol. xiv. p. 614, &c.). He is probably the same person as the physician named Martialis, though it is uncertain which name is correct. Some medical formulae by a physician of the same name are quoted by Aetius (2.3. 110, 2.4. 47, 3.3. 11, pp. 358, 402, 554) and Scribonius Largus ( 46.177. p. 223); but this cannot be the same person as the contemporary of Galen, as lie lived about the beginning of the Christian era in the reign of Augustus. [W.A.
Martia'lis (*Marti/alios), a physician and anatomist at Rome, who was born about the year 95 after Christ. Galen became personally acquainted with him during his first visit to Rome, about A. D. 165, and speaks of him as an envious and quarrelsome person. He was a follower or admirer of Erasistratus, and wrote some anatomical works, which were in great repute for some years after his death (Galen, De Libris Propriis, 100.1, vol. xix. p. 13). He is probably the same person as the physician named Marcianus, though it is not quite certain which name is correct. [W.A.
ution under M. Aurelius. During the same persecution, Melito composed his Apologia,which, as it was addressed to Aurelius alone, appears to have been written after the death of Lucius Verus, in A. D. 169. The Chronicon of Eusebius places its presentation in A. D. 169-170 : it must have been written then or between those years and A. D. 180, in which Aurelius himself died [AURELIUS MARCUS]. The Chronicon Paschale seems to ascribe to Melito two apologies, one presented to Aurelius and Verus, A. D. 165, the other to Aurelius alone, A. D. 169. Tillemont is disposed to place the Apology as late as the year 175; Pearson and Dodwell between 170 and 175; and Basnage (Annales Politic. Eccles.) and Lardner as late as A. D. 177. The time, place, and manner of Melito's death are not accurately and certainly known: from the silence of Polycrates (apud Euseb. l.c.) it may be inferred that he was not a Martyr; the place of his death may be conjectured from that of his interment, which Polycrates sta
Orfitus 8. M. Gavius Orfitus, consul A. D. 165, with L. Arrius Pudens.
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
notorious by the open perpetration of the most disgusting obscenity. Thence he proceeded to Rome and endeavoured to attract attention by his ribaldry and abuse, for which he was expelled by the praefectus urbis. His next visit was to Elis, where he tried to incite the people against the Romans. Having exhausted all the methods of making himself conspicuous, he at length resolved on publicly burning himself at the Olympic games; and carried his resolution into effect in the 236th Olympiad, A. D. 165. The Parians raised a statue to his memory, which was reputed to be oracular. (Anaxagoras, quoted by Valois. Ad Amn. Mlarcell.) Lucian, who knew Peregrinus in his youth, and who was present at his strange self-immolation, has perhaps overcharged the narrative of his life. Wieland was so strongly of this opinion that, being unable to refute Lucian from ancient authors, he wrote his romance of Peregrinus Proteus, as a sort of vindication of the philosopher. A. Gellius gives a much more favou
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Priscus, Sta'tius consul A. D. 159, with Plautius Quintillus, two years before the death of the emperor Antoninus (Fasti). He was one of the generals sent by his successor, M. Aurelius, to conduct the war against the Parthians, A. D. 162-165. He took Artaxata, the capital of Armenia, and rescued the whole of that country from the Parthian power. (Capitolin. Anton. Phil. 9, Verus, 7; Dio Cass. lxxi. Fragm. p. 1201, ed. Reimarus.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Pudens, L. A'rrius consul A. D. 165, with M. Gavius Orfitus (Fasti).
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