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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 27 27 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 6 6 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 6 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 2 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1 1 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1654 AD or search for 1654 AD in all documents.

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a discovery of the eastern rivers and harbors—the Saco, the Kennebunk, and the York; and the channel of the Piscataqua was examined for three or four leagues. Meeting no sassafras, he steered for the south; doubled Cape Ann; and went on shore in Massachusetts; but, being still unsuccessful, he again pursued a southerly track, and finally anchored in Old Town harbor, on Martha's Vineyard. The whole absence lasted about six months, and was completed without disaster or danger. Purchas, IV. 1654—1656. Compare Belknap, II. 123—133; Williamson's Maine, i. p. 185—187. Pring, a few years later, 1606. repeated his voyage, and made a more accurate survey of Maine. Enterprises for discovery were now continuous. Bartholomew Gilbert, Purchas, IV. 1656—1658. returning from the West Indies, made an unavailing search for the colony of Raleigh. It was the last attempt to trace the remains of those unfortunate men. But as the testimony of Pring had confirmed the reports of Gosnold, th
condition of the colony, as settled by Bennett and Clayborne, to have been a state of rebellion. Strong, 3. Hazard, i. 626. The date is there 1653. It was in 1654, as Strong asserts. McMahon, 206, cites Hazard doubtingly. Bacon, 1654, c. XLV. Hammond, 22. A railing proclamation to that effect was published to the Puritans1654, c. XLV. Hammond, 22. A railing proclamation to that effect was published to the Puritans in their church meeting. The measures were rash and ill advised. No sooner did Clayborne and his colleague learn the new revolu- July tion, than they hastened to Maryland; where it was immediately obvious, that they could be met by no effectual resistance. Unable to persuade Stone, in a peaceable and loving way, to abandon heir wanton disfranchisement. An act concerning religion confirmed the freedom of conscience, provided the liberty were not extended to popery, prelacy, Bacon, 1654, c. IV or licentiousness of opinion. Yet Cromwell, a friend to religious toleration, and willing that the different sects, like the cedar, and the myrtle, and the
re success with the executive council was due to the powerful intercession of Sir Henry Vane. Under God, the sheet-anchor of Rhode Island was Sir Henry. Backus, i. 286. But for him, Rhode Island would perhaps have been divided among Chap. X.} 1654. Aug. 27. its neighbors. From the first beginning of the Providence colony,—thus did the town-meeting address Sir Henry Vane,—you have been a noble and true friend to an outcast and despised people; we have ever reaped the sweet fruits of your colways fixed on posterity. Domestic discipline was highly valued; but if the law was severe against the undutiful child, it was also severe against a faithless parent. The slave-trade was forbidden under penalty of death. The earliest laws, till 1654, did not permit any man's person to be kept in prison for debt, except when there was an appearance of some estate which the debtor would not produce. Col Laws, 48—Even the brute creation was not forgotten; and cruelty towards animals was a civ<