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ouri, changed the eighteen votes of that State from Bates to Lincoln. Others followed, until Mr. Lincoln had 354 out of 466 votes, and was declared duly nominated. On motion of Mr. Wm. M. Evarts, of New York, seconded by Mr. John A. Andrew, of Massachusetts, the nomination was made unanimous. In the evening, the Convention proceeded to ballot for Vice-President, when Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, received, on the first ballot, 194 votes; Cassius M. Clay, of Kentucky, 101 1/2; and there were 1656 cast for other candidates. On the second ballot, Mr. Hamlin received 367 votes to 99 for all others, and was declared duly nominated. On motion of Mr. George D. Blakey, of Kentucky, the nomination was made unanimous. On motion of Mr. Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio, it was Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with those men who have been driven, some from their native States and others from the States of their adoption, and are now exiled from their homes on account of their opinions; and
of replevin, then we must appeal to lost records, or give up. In the county records we find the following names of men represented as at Medford:-- George Felt1633. James Noyes1634. Richard Berry1636. Thomas Mayhew1636. Benjamin Crisp1636. James Garrett1637. John Smith1638. Richard Cooke1640. Josiah Dawstin1641. ----Dix1641. Ri. Dexter1644. William Sargent1648. James Goodnow1650. John Martin1650. Edward Convers1650. Goulden Moore1654. Robert Burden1655. Richard Russell1656. Thos. Shephard1657. Thos. Danforth1658. Thomas Greene1659. James Pemberton1659. Joseph Hills1662. Jonathan Wade1668. Edward Collins1669. John Call1669. Daniel Deane1669. Samuel Hayward1670. Caleb Brooks1672. Daniel Markham1675. John Whitmore1678. John Greenland1678. Daniel Woodward1679. Isaac Fox1679. Stephen Willis1680. Thomas Willis1680. John Hall1680. Gersham Swan1684. Joseph Angier1684. John Bradshaw1685. Stephen Francis1685. Peter Tufts1686. Jonathan Tufts1690.
r, b. Sept. 28, 1725.  5Sarah, b. Mar. 2, 1727.  6Caleb, b. June 31, 1728.   His first wife, Elizabeth, d. Feb. 3, 1718.  1Oldham, Thomas, of Scituate, 1650, and in 1635 aged ten perhaps; m. Mary, dau. of Rev. William Witherell, of Scituate, 1656, by whom he had Mary, Thomas, Sarah, Hannah, Grace, Isaac (2), Ruth, Elizabeth, and Lydia. He d. 1711.  1-2Isaac Oldham, b. about 1670, went to Pembroke about 1703, where he m. Mary Keen, and had two daus., and a son,--  2-3Isaac Oldham, who m. Mary Pollard. Joshua was fifth son of William Wyman, by his wife Prudence Putnam; was b. Jan. 3, 1693, and d. c. 1770. William W. was second son of Francis W., of Woburn, who came here at an early date, and m., 2d, Abigail Read. William was b. 1656. His father, Francis, d. Nov. 28, 1699, aged c. 82. James Wyman, of Medford, m. Susanna Cutter, Mar. 18, 1756, who d., aged 38, May 12, 1772. He d. Oct. 26, 1813. Children were--  1-2 James, b. Jan. 21, 1757; m.,1st, Mehitable----; 2d, Ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, Sir William, (search)
nists was guaranteed. Berkeley regarding those whom the commissioners represented as usurpers, he would make no stipulations with them for himself, and he withdrew from the governorship and lived in retirement on his plantation at Green Spring until the restoration of monarchy in England in 1660, when the loyalty of the Virginians was not forgotten by the new monarch. The people elected Richard Bennett governor; and he was succeeded by two others — Edward Diggs (1655) and Samuel Matthews (1656), the latter appointed by Oliver Cromwell. At his death (1660) the people elected Berkeley, but he refused to serve excepting under a royal commission, and he went to England to congratulate Charles II. on his restoration to the throne. Charles gave Berkeley a commission, and he returned to Virginia to execute his master's will with vigor. He enforced various oppressive laws, for he was less tolerant than when he was younger and politically weaker, and, with the cavaliers around him, he h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, James, 1656-1743 (search)
Blair, James, 1656-1743 Educator; born in Scotland in 1656; was sent to Virginia as a missionary in 1865 and in 1692 obtained the charter of William and Mary College, of which he was the first president. He published The state of his Majesty's colony in Virginia, in 1727. He died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 1, 1743.< Blair, James, 1656-1743 Educator; born in Scotland in 1656; was sent to Virginia as a missionary in 1865 and in 1692 obtained the charter of William and Mary College, of which he was the first president. He published The state of his Majesty's colony in Virginia, in 1727. He died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 1, 1743.<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
fficers were killed in action, 666 men and forty-eight officers died from wounds, and 3,246 men and sixty-three officers from disease. There were reported missing 389 men and twenty-one officers. Population in 1890, 746,258; in 1900, 908,355. Governors of the Connecticut colony Name.Date. John Haynes1639 to 1640 Edward Hopkins1640 to 1641 John Haynes1641 to 1642 George Wyllys1642 to 1643 John Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas Welles1655 to 1656 John Webster1656 to 1657 John Winthrop1657 to 1658 Thomas Welles1658 to 1659 John Winthrop1659 to 1665 Until this time no person could be elected to a second term immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 William Leete1661 to 1665 Governors of Connecticut Name.Date John Winthrop1665 to 1676 William Leete1676 to 1683 Robert Treat1683 to 1687 Edmund Andros1687 to 1689 Robert Treat1689 to 1698 Fitz
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Friends, Society of (search)
Friends, Society of Otherwise known as Quakers, claim as their founder George Fox (q. v.), an Englishman; born in Drayton, Leicestershire, in 1624. The first general meeting of Friends was held in 1668, and the second in 1672. Owing to the severe persecution which they suffered in England, a number of them came to America in 1656, and landed at Boston, whence they were later scattered by persecution. The first annual meeting in America is said to have been held in Rhode Island in 1661. It was separated from the London annual meeting in 1683. This meeting was held regularly at Newport till 1878, since when it has alternated between Newport and Portland, Quaker Exhorter in colonial New England. Me. Annual meetings were founded in Maryland in 1672, in Pennsylvania and New Jersey in 1681, in North Carolina in 1708, and in Ohio in 1812. The Friends have no creed, and no sacraments. They claim that a spiritual baptism and a spiritual communion without outward signs are all
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jenckes, Joseph (search)
Jenckes, Joseph Colonial governor; born on the site of the city of Pawtucket, R. I., in 1656; held a seat in the General Assembly of Rhode Island in 1679-93; was appointed to arrange the boundary disputes with Connecticut and Massachusetts, and afterwards those which had arisen between Massachusetts and New Hampshire and Maine. He was also made commissioner to answer a letter of the King regarding the condition of affairs in Rhode Island, and to reply to a number of questions proposed by the lords of the privy council. He was governor of Rhode Island in 1727-32. He died June 15, 1740.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jesuit missions. (search)
imon Le Moyne, at Onondaga, July, 1654; with the Mohawks from Sept. 16, 1655, until Nov. 9 of the same year; then again in 1656, until Nov. 5; again there (third time) from Aug. 26, 1657, until May, 1658; at Onondaga, from July, 1661, until September1652; started for Onondaga Aug. 28, 1657, but was recalled to Montreal. Rene Menard was with Le Mercier at Onondaga from 1656 to 1658, and afterwards among the Cayugas. Julien Garnier, sent to the Mohawks in May, 1668, passed to Onondaga, and thenOnondaga a few years after 1655, and was afterwards among the tribes of the Upper Lakes. Jacques Fremin, at Onondaga from 1656 to 1658; was sent to the Mohawks in July, 1667; left there for the Senecas in October, 1668, where he remained a few years. Pierre Rafeix, at Onondaga from 1656 to 1658; chaplain in Courcelle's expedition in 1665; sent to the Cayugas in 1671, thence to Seneca, where he was in 1679. Jacques Bruyas, sent to the Mohawks, July, 1667, and to the Oneidas in September, where
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), La Tour, Charles -1656 (search)
La Tour, Charles -1656 Proprietary governor. When Acadia, or Nova Scotia, was returned to the French (1632), it was apportioned into provinces, under proprietary governors. To Razille, commander-in-chief, was granted the southern portion of the peninsula, and one of his lieutenants was Charles La Tour, to whom was assigned a large portion of the territory. He and Seigneur D'Aulnay Charissy (another lieutenant), who controlled a section extending westward to the Kennebee River, were both rom the wilderness, vindicated his character before his sovereign, was made lieutenantgovernor of Acadia, and again recovered his fort at St. John. He married the widow of his rival, and inherited his shattered estate, and prosperity once more smiled upon the Huguenot; for his claim to extensive territorial rights in Acadia, by virtue of Sir William Alexander's grant to his father, was recognized in 1656. He soon afterwards died. Acadia had then passed once more into the hands of the English.
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