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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 43 43 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 13 13 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904 2 2 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 2 2 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 15, section 424 (search)
Herod's temple, is a demonstration that such its building was a known thing in Judea at this time. He was born about forty-six years after it is related to have been finished, and might himself have seen and spoken with some of the builders themselves, and with a great number of those that had seen it building. The doubt therefore about the truth of this history of the pulling down and rebuilding this temple by Herod, which some weak people have indulged, was not then much greater than it soon may be, whether or not our St. Paul's church in London was burnt down in the fire of London, A.D. 1666, and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren a little afterward. that during the time that the temple was building, it did not rain in the daytime, but that the showers fell in the nights, so that the work was not hindered. And this our fathers have delivered to us; nor is it incredible, if any one have regard to the manifestations of God. And thus was performed the work of the rebuilding of the temple.
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VII. We here enter upon the third division of Pliny's Natural History, which treats of Zoology, from the 7th to the 11th inclusive. Cuvier has illustrated this part by many valuable notes, which originally appeared in Lemaire's Bibliotheque Classique, 1827, and were afterwards incorporated, with some additions, by Ajasson, in his translation of Pliny, published in 1829; Ajasson is the editor of this portion of Pliny's Natural History, in Lemaire's Edition.—B. MAN, HIS BIRTH, HIS ORGANIZATION, AND THE INVENTION OF THE ARTS., CHAP. 1.—MAN. (search)
obliged to devise against his maladies, and those thwarted every now and then by new forms and features of disease.There is little doubt that new forms and features of disease are continually making their appearance among mankind, and even the same peoples, and have been from the earliest period; it was so at Rome, in the days of the Republic and of the Emperors. It is not improbable that these new forms of disease depend greatly upon changes in the temperature and diet. The plagues of 1348, 1666, and the Asiatic cholera of the present day, are not improbably various features of what may be radically the same disease. At the first period the beverage of the English was beer, or rather sweet-wort, as the hop does not appear to have been used till a later period. At the present day, tea and coffee, supported by ardent spirits, form the almost universal beverage. While other animals have an instinctive knowledge of their natural powers; some, of their swiftness of pace, some of their rap
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
completely changed ground, the armies of the former operating in the States, while the English were in possession of Canada. The first expedition to be noticed against that portion of the country, was conducted by Samuel Argall, who sailed from Virginia in 1613, with a fleet of eleven vessels, attacked the French on the Penobscot, and afterwards the St. Croix. In 1654, Sedgwick, at the head of a small New England army, attacked the French on the Penobscot, and overrun all Arcadia. In 1666, during the contest between Charles II. and Louis XIV., it was proposed to march the New England troops across the country by the Kennebec or Penobscot, and attack Quebec; but the terrors and difficulties of crossing over rocky mountains and howling deserts were such as to deter them from undertaking the campaign. In 1689, Count Frontenac, governor of Canada, made a descent into New York to assist the French fleet in reducing that province. His line of march was by the river Sorrel and L
and the cotton-plant was grown in Sicily and along the northern coast of the Mediterranean so early as the tenth century. The culture, however, does not appear to have ever attained a great importance in any portion of the world regarded by the Greeks and Romans as civilized, prior to its recent establishment in Egypt, in obedience to the despotic will of Ibrahim Pacha. In the British colonies now composing this country, the experiment of cotton-planting was tried so early as 1621; and in 1666 the growth of the cotton-plant is on record. The cultivation slowly and fitfully expanded throughout the following century, extending northward to the eastern shore of Maryland and the southernmost point of New Jersey--where, however, the plant was grown more for ornament than use. It is stated that seven bags of cotton-wool were among the exports of Charleston, S. C., in 1748, and that trifling shipments from that port were likewise made in 1754 and 1757. In 1784, it is recorded that eight
at meeting, and each narrated what news he had found. The father had heard how much money was sunk by Mr. Cradock in his fishing speculation; and the reading boy had brought home J. Janeway's Address to citizens of London, after the great fire of 1666, just published. The first act after Sunday dinner was to take off the Sunday clothes. Each one does this; and then the mother assembles her children around her, each seated on his block; and she hears them repeat the Catechism, and then endeavost of the people? For many of our modern superfluities they had no names in their vocabulary. So late as our day, we have seen aged persons who have assured us that they never tasted tea or coffee until they were over twenty-one years of age. In 1666, tea, in England, was sixty shillings sterling a pound, and was not used much in America till 1750. It was nearly the same with coffee. Any cooking which required sugar was too expensive for our early ancestors; and the Sunday suit of clothes we
24, 1825.   Mary Jane, b. Aug. 1, 1828.   Judith, b. Feb. 2, 1831.   Lucy Ann, b. June 22, 1833.   George W., b. Apr. 2, 1838.   Angier, Samuel, m. Abigail Watson, Apr. 29, 1762.   John Angier m. Abby S. Adams.   Luther Angier m. Lydia Farley.   Ballard, Mary, dau. of Joseph and Mary B., d. Sept. 16, 1716.   Samuel, son of Joseph and Mary Ballard, b. Dec. 27, 1718; d. Aug. 10, 1721.   Birdue, Philip, m. Ann Soloman, Oct. 7, 1704.  1Bishop, Thomas, of Ipswich, merchant, Rep. 1666; d. Feb. 7, 1671, leaving widow, Margaret. Children:--  1-2Samuel.  3John.  4Thomas.  5Job.  6Nathaniel. 1-2Samuel Bishop m. Hester----; d. March, 1681; and had, inter alios,--  2-7Dr. John Bishop, moved from Bradford to Medford, Sept. 20, 1685, and died 1739. He m. Sarah----, and had-- 7-8John Bishop, b. 1722, who m. Abigail, dau. of Dr. Simon Tufts, Dec. 7, 1752. He. d. 1791, leaving--  8-9Abigail, b. Oct. 5, 1753; m. Dr. James Putnam, of Danvers, Nov. 12, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bellingham, Richard, 1592- (search)
Bellingham, Richard, 1592- Colonial governor; born in England in 1592. Bred a lawyer, he came to America in 1634, and was chosen deputy governor of Massachusetts the next year. He was elected governor, in opposition to Winthrop, in 1641. He was rechosen in 1654, and in 1666, after the death of Governor Endicott, continuing in office the rest of his life. His administration was a somewhat stormy one. Bellingham was so opposed to all innovations in religious matters that he was severe in his conduct towards the Friends, or Quakers. He died Dec. 7, 1672.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brenton, William, 1666-1674 (search)
Brenton, William, 1666-1674 Royal governor; born in England; was governor of Rhode Island in 1666 under the charter from Charles II., and was one of the original nine proprietors of Rhode Island. Brenton's Point and Brenton's Reef in Narraganset Bay were named after him. He died in Newport, R. I., in 1674. Brenton, William, 1666-1674 Royal governor; born in England; was governor of Rhode Island in 1666 under the charter from Charles II., and was one of the original nine proprietors of Rhode Island. Brenton's Point and Brenton's Reef in Narraganset Bay were named after him. He died in Newport, R. I., in 1674.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carr, Sir Robert 1664-1667 (search)
Carr, Sir Robert 1664-1667 Commissioner; born in Northumberland, England. In 1664 he was appointed, with Sir Richard Nicolls (q. v.) and others, on a commission to regulate the affairs of New England, and to take possession of New Netherland (q. v.). The commission came on a fleet which had been fitted out to operate against the Dutch settlers on the Hudson. Carr and Nichols gained possession of New Netherland Aug. 27, 1664, and named it New York in honor of the Duke of York. On Sept. 24 of the same year Fort Orange surrendered to the English, and was renamed Albany. In February, 1665, Carr and his associates went to Boston, but the colonists there declined to recognize them, as did also the towns in New Hampshire. In Maine, however, the commissioners were well received, and a new government was established in that colony, which lasted from 1666 to 1668. He died in Bristol, England, June 1, 1667.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb 1646-1666 (search)
Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb 1646-1666 Indian; born in Massachusetts in 1646; graduated at Harvard College in 1665, being the only Indian who received a degree from that institution. He died in Charlestown, Mass., in 1666. Cheeshahteaumuck, Caleb 1646-1666 Indian; born in Massachusetts in 1646; graduated at Harvard College in 1665, being the only Indian who received a degree from that institution. He died in Charlestown, Mass., in 1666.
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