Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1676 AD or search for 1676 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 26 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Almanacs, American. (search)
Almanacs, American. No copy is known to exist of the almanac of 1639. the first published in America. calculated for New England by William Pierce, mariner; another, the Boston almanac, by John Foster, 1676. William Bradford at Philadelphia published an almanac of twenty pages, 1685. commonly received as the first almanac published in the colonies; a copy from the Brinley library sold in New York, March, 1882, for $555.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, Sir William, (search)
ans. These cavaliers despised the common people of New England, and opposed the ideas of popular education. Berkeley wrote to his government in 1665. I thank God there are no free schools nor printing in Virginia, and I hope we shall not have them these hundred years; for learning has brought heresy and disobedience and sects into the world, and printing hath divulged them, and libels against the best government; God keep us from both! Oppression of the people finally produced civil war in 1676, the events of which soured Berkeley, who had then grown old (see Bacon, Nathaniel); and after it was over, and he was firmly seated in power, he treated the principal abettors of the insurrection with harshness and cruelty. His King had proclaimed Bacon (the leader of the insurrection) a traitor, and sent an armament under Sir John Berry to assist in crushing the rebellion. This was the first time royal troops were sent to America to suppress the aspirations of the people for freedom. Fee
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Claiborne, or Clayborne, William 1589- (search)
t go to England to justify his conduct before the home government. A court of inquiry—held three years afterwards to investigate the matter—resulted in a formal indictment of Claiborne, and a bill of attainder passed against him. Thomas Smith, next in rank to Warren, was hanged. Claiborne, who was now treasurer of Virginia, retaliated against Maryland by stirring up civil war there, and, expelling Gov. Leonard Calvert (1645), assumed the reins of government. In 1651 Claiborne was appointed, by the council of state in England, one of the commissioners for reducing Virginia to obedience to the commonwealth ruled by Parliament; and he also took part in governing Maryland by a commission. He was soon afterwards made secretary of the colony of Virginia, and held the office until after the restoration of monarchy (1660) in England. Claiborne was one of the court that tried the captured followers of Nathaniel Bacon (q. v.). He resided in New Kent county, Va., until his death, about 1676
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clarke, John 1609-1676 (search)
Clarke, John 1609-1676 Clergyman; born in Bedfordshire, England, Oct. 8, 1609; emigrated to Boston in 1637, but, espousing the cause of Anne Hutchinson (q. v.), and claiming full toleration in religious belief, he was obliged to flee. He was welcomed to Providence by Roger Williams. He was one of the company who gained Rhode Island from the Indians, and began a settlement at Pocasset in 1638. A preacher of the Gospel, he founded, at Newport (1664), the second Baptist church in America. He was treasurer of the colony in 1649. Mr. Clarke was persecuted while visiting friends in Massachusetts, and driven out of the colony. He accompanied Williams to England in 1651 as agent for the colony, where he remained nearly twelve years, and returned (1663) with a second charter for Rhode Island. He resumed his pastorate at Newport, where for three successive years he was deputygovernor of the colony. His publications include Ill news from New England; Or a narrative of New England's pe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clarke, Walter (search)
Clarke, Walter Colonial governor; deputy-governor of Rhode Island in 1675-67; governor in 1676-79; deputy in 1679-86; and then governor again. In 1687 he was compelled to surrender the government into the hands of the royal governor who had been commissioned in England; and in 1688 became a member of the governor's council under the new commission. In 1696, eight years after the overthrow of the royal governor, he was again elected governor, but after two years resigned.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
hn Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas Welles1655 to 1656 John Webster1656 to 1657 John Winthrop1657 to 1658 Thomas Welles1658 to 1659 John Winthrop1659 to 1665 Until this time no person could be elected to a second term immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 William Leete1661 to 1665 Governors of Connecticut Name.Date John Winthrop1665 to 1676 William Leete1676 to 1683 Robert Treat1683 to 1687 Edmund Andros1687 to 1689 Robert Treat1689 to 1698 Fitz John Winthrop1698 to 1707 Gurdon Saltonstall1707 to 1724 Joseph Talcott1724 to 1741 Jonathan Law1741 to 1750 Roger Wolcott1750 to 1754 Thomas Fitch1754 to 1766 William Pitkin1766 to 1769 Jonathan Trumbull1769 to 1784 Mathew Griswold1784 to 1786 Samuel Huntington1786 to 1796 Oliver Wolcott1796 to 1798 Jonathan Trumbull1798 to 1809 John Treadwell1809 to 1811 Roger Griswold1811 to 1813 John
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwaleys, or Cormwaleys, Thomas (search)
Cornwaleys, or Cormwaleys, Thomas pioneer; born about 1600; was one of the leaders in the establishment of the colony at St. Mary's. In 1635 he led a force against Claiborne, and in 1638, when Lord Baltimore sent out a code to be adopted by the General Assembly, he opposed it, alleging that the charter of the freemen gave them the right to enact their own laws. During 1638 he was made deputy governor; in 1642 was commissioned commander of an expedition against the Indians; in 1652 became a member of the general court; and in 1657, when the government was restored to Lord Baltimore, he was appointed assistant governor. He returned to England in 1659, and died there in 1676.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garakonthie, Daniel -1676 (search)
Garakonthie, Daniel -1676 Chief of the Onondaga Indians. In 1658, although the French were compelled to flee from Onondaga, Garakonthie became a protector of Christian doctrines and an advocate for peace. It was not, however, till 1669 that he was converted and baptized. The name Daniel was given him at his baptism, and he learned to read and write. His influence went far in checking the superstition of the Indians and in settling difficulties between Indian tribes, and also in protectis. In 1658, although the French were compelled to flee from Onondaga, Garakonthie became a protector of Christian doctrines and an advocate for peace. It was not, however, till 1669 that he was converted and baptized. The name Daniel was given him at his baptism, and he learned to read and write. His influence went far in checking the superstition of the Indians and in settling difficulties between Indian tribes, and also in protecting French colonists. lie died in Onondaga, N. Y., in 1676.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Andrew 1686-1703 (search)
Hamilton, Andrew 1686-1703 Governor; born in Scotland; sent to East Jersey by its proprietaries in 1686; became acting governor in 1687; returned to England in 1689; appointed governor of East Jersey in 1692; deposed in 1697, and reappointed in 1699. William Penn made him deputy governor of Pennsylvania in 1701. Hamilton obtained the first patent from the crown for a postal service in 1694. He died in Burlington, N. J., April 20, 1703. Lawyer; born in Scotland, about 1676; acquired much distinction by his defence of the liberty of the press on the trial of Zenger in New York. He filled many public stations in Pennsylvania, including that of speaker of the Assembly, which he resigned in 1739 in consequence of physical infirmity. He died in Philadelphia Aug. 4, 1741. See Zenger, John Peter.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jamestown. (search)
ttlers at Jamestown escaped the calamity through the good offices of Chanco, a friendly Indian, who gave them timely warning of the plot, and they were prepared for defence. Jamestown became a refuge from the storm for the western settlements. Sickness and famine ensued, and the colony was greatly reduced Jamestown in 1622. in number, for many left through fear. It soon recovered, and increased in strength. A new and substantial church was built, with a heavy brick tower, probably between 1620 and 1625. During Jamestown in 1876. Bacon's Rebellion, in 1676. Jamestown— the only village in all Virginia —was entered by that leader, after driving away the governor, and, in a council of war it was determined to burn the town, a rumor having reached Bacon that the royalist troops were coming upon him. The torch was applied just at twilight, and the Virginia capital was laid in ashes. Nothing remained the next morning but the brick tower of the church and a few solitary chimn
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