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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith) 6 6 Browse Search
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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Justi'nus Martyr (search)
ever known: the Greek Menaea (a. d. 1 Junii) state that he drank hemlock. His death is generally considered to have taken place in the persecution under the emperor Marcus Antoninus; and the Chronicon Paschale, (vol.i. p. 258, ed. Paris, 207, ed. Venice, 482, ed Bonn), which is followed by Tillemont, Baronius, Pagi, Otto, and other moderns, places it in the consulship of Orphitus and Pudens, A. D. 165; Dupin and Semisch place it in A. D. 166, Fleury in A. D. 167, and Tillemont and Maran in A. D. 168. Papebroche (Acta Sanctorum, April. vol. ii. p. 107), assigning the Apologia Secunda of Justin to the year 171, contends that he must have lived to or beyond that time. Dodwell, on the contrary, following the erroneous statement of Eusebius in his Chronicon, places his death in the reign of Antoninus Pius; and Epiphanius, according to the present reading of the passage already referred to, which is most likely corrupt, places it in the reign of the emperor Hadrian or Adrian, a manifest err
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Paulus, Se'rgius 3. L. Sergius Paulus, consul A. D. 168 with L. Venuleius Apronianus, in the reign of M. Aurelius (Fasti).
was also his son-in-law and pupil. He, too, practised rhetoric at Athens; and he died and was buried at Lemnos. Works According to Suidas, Philostratus the Lemnian wrote :--*Ei)ko/nas, *Panaqhnai+ko/n, *Trwiko/n, *Para/frasin th=s *(Omh/rou a)spi/dos, *Mele/tas. And some attribute to him the lives of the sophists generally assigned to his grand-uncle. Problems with the *Ei)ko/nes This account is palpably inconsistent with itself, as it makes a man who lived in the time of Nero, A. D. 54-168, the father of another who was alive under Philip, A. D. 244-249. Besides, the connection between the second and the third Philostratus is unintelligible, and, if we are to take every thing as it stands, is contradicted by a passage in the *Ei)ko/nes of the author last-mentioned, where he speaks of the second as *Mhtropa/twr, which Fabricius, following an alteration of Meursius on the text of Suidas, translates avunculus. Those difficulties are rendered insuperable by the fact that the second
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), Philo'stratus or Philostratus the Lemnian (search)
was also his son-in-law and pupil. He, too, practised rhetoric at Athens; and he died and was buried at Lemnos. Works According to Suidas, Philostratus the Lemnian wrote :--*Ei)ko/nas, *Panaqhnai+ko/n, *Trwiko/n, *Para/frasin th=s *(Omh/rou a)spi/dos, *Mele/tas. And some attribute to him the lives of the sophists generally assigned to his grand-uncle. Problems with the *Ei)ko/nes This account is palpably inconsistent with itself, as it makes a man who lived in the time of Nero, A. D. 54-168, the father of another who was alive under Philip, A. D. 244-249. Besides, the connection between the second and the third Philostratus is unintelligible, and, if we are to take every thing as it stands, is contradicted by a passage in the *Ei)ko/nes of the author last-mentioned, where he speaks of the second as *Mhtropa/twr, which Fabricius, following an alteration of Meursius on the text of Suidas, translates avunculus. Those difficulties are rendered insuperable by the fact that the second
or of one of the early apologies for Christianity which have come down to us. The common opinion concerning his time, derived from Eusebius, Jerome, and Nicephorus, has been elaborately canvassed by Dodwell and others, whose arguments are fully examined, and satisfactorily answered by Cave (Hist. Litt. s. a. 168), and Harless (ad Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. vii. p. 102). In the eighth (Heron. Chron. s. a. 2184) or tenth (Euseb. Chron. s. a. 2186 ; Syncoll. p. 352d.) year of Marcus Antoninus (A. D. 168/9 or 170/1), he succeeded Eros in the see of Antioch, of which he was the sixth bishop (Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 4.20; Hieron. de Vir. Ill. 25), or, including S. Peter, the seventh (Hieron. Algas. vol. iii. p. 318; Niceph. Chron. p. 417c.) ; and he held that office for thirteen years, that is, till A. D. 181 or 183 (Niceph. l.c.). Having been originally a heathen * Respecting the opinion that he was not a heathen, but a Jew and a Sadducee, see Harless, l.c., p. 101. , as he tells us himself (Ad
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
L. Venuleius Apronia'nus 1. Consul suffectus under Domitian, A. D. 92. 2. Consul under Hadrian A. D. 123 with Q. Articuleius Paetinus. 3. Consul under M. Aurelius A. D. 168 with L. Sergius Paulus (Fasti).