Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for 1684 AD or search for 1684 AD in all documents.

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a cartway of two rods wide unto the same. Windmill-hill was at the south end of Ash Street, near the former site of the Cambridge Gas Works. A windmill was there erected for the grinding of corn, as no mill moved by water-power was nearer than Watertown. This mill was removed to Boston in August, 1632, because it would not grind but with a westerly wind. —Savage's Winthrop, i. 87. The hill was afterwards enclosed by Richard Eccles, who owned the adjoining lands, and it so remained until 1684, when the town asserted its rights; and a tract measuring ten rods on the river, six rods and seven feet across the west end, ten rods and four feet on the north line, and seven and a half rods across the cast end, was acknowledged by Eccles to be public property, together with a highway to it, two rods wide, through his land; and his acknowledgment was entered on the Proprietors' Records. April 7, 1634. Granted John Pratt two acres by the old burying place, without the common pales. S
said petition sent them, with a notification of the time for their being heard thereupon this day, and accordingly attending:—After a full hearing and consideration of what was offered by both parties, it is granted and ordered by this Court, that the petitioners be and are hereby permitted and allowed to invite and settle an able and orthodox minister for the dispensing of the gospel among them; and that all inhabitants being within the line formerly stated by a Committee of this Court, anno 1684, beginning at the first run of water or swampy place over which is a kind of bridge in the way on the southerly side of Francis Whitmore's house, towards the town of Cambridge aforesaid, cross the neck of land lying between Woburn line and that of Watertown side, upon a southwest and northeast course, do pay unto the ministers maintained there; and are hereby empowered annually to choose three or five meet persons to assess their inhabitants for the support and maintenance of their minister,
e to and from Boston; which teams almost entirely disappeared immediately after the construction of railroads, and the inns did not long afterwards flourish. Besides innkeepers, the County Court licensed others to sell intoxicating liquors by retail. Among the names of such retailers, in addition to those who have already been mentioned, the following appear during the first century:— John Stedman, 1653-1686. William Manning, 1654-1686. Edmund Angier, 1674-1686. Samuel Andrew, 1684-1691. William Andrew, 1701. Mrs. Seeth Andrew, 1702-1703. Zachariah Hicks, 1704-1717. Martha Remington, 1705-1712. Jonathan Remington, 1713-1735. Nathaniel Hancock, Jr., 1707-1709. Mary Bordman, 1708-1714. John Stedman, 1717-1724. Sarah Fessenden, 1720-1735. Mary Oliver, 1731-1732. Edward Marrett, 1733-1735. Two of these retailers in their old age found it necessary to appeal to the County Court for relief; their petitions are still preserved on file, to wit:
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 15: ecclesiastical History. (search)
the town's charge. The orthography of this record is extraordinarily vicious, and is here corrected. During Mr. Gookin's ministry, the church continued to remember the poor. Contributions were taken for Joseph Graves, in 1683, Moses Eyers, in 1684, and Thomas Gould, in 1685, severally in Turkey slavery; for poor Frenchmen, in 1686, who fled here for shelter; and in 1692 for York captives with the Indians. In 1686, seven pounds were contributed for the relief of John Parker at the Village, (some of them six, some eight, some nine, if not ten miles), from the public place of meeting to worship God in the town that we appertain unto. This petition was opposed by Cambridge, and was not granted by the General Court. It was renewed in 1684, when it met a similar fate. The request was finally granted, Dec. 15, 1691; and although a church was not organized, separate from the mother church, until nearly five years later, Rev. Benjamin Estabrook was engaged to preach one year in the pa
644, 1646, 1648, 1650, 1651, 1662, 1663, 1673, 1682, 1684. George Cooke, 1638, 1642, 1643. Samuel Sheparmond,* 1657, 1677. John Watson, 1657, 1665, 1682, 1684, Nathaniel Sparhawk, 1658, 1677-1680. 1683, 1685,7, 1689. William Dickson, 1667, 1679, 1680, 1682, 1684. Gregory Cooke,* 1667. Francis Whitmore,* 1668, 1694. John Kendrick,* 1671. John Gove, 1671, 1684, 1690, 1697. William Barrett, 1671, 1681. Samue, 1673, 1681, 1688, 1692. Daniel Champney, 1673, 1684, 1686, 1687. Noah Wiswall,* 1673. Job Hyde,* 1 James Prentice,* 1680. Abraham Holmnan, 1681, 1684, 1685. James Cutler, Jr.,* 1681. Sebeas Jackson,* 1683. John Tidd,* 1683. David Fiske, Jr.,* 1684. Joseph Russell,* 1684. John Prentice,* 1684. 1684. John Prentice,* 1684. James Hubbard,* 1685. Thomas Cutler,* 1685. Aaron Bordman,* 1686. Thomas Andrews,* 1686. Ebenez1684. James Hubbard,* 1685. Thomas Cutler,* 1685. Aaron Bordman,* 1686. Thomas Andrews,* 1686. Ebenezer Wiswall,* 1686. Philip Russell, 1686, 1700, 1701. Edward Winship, 1691-1693, 1695– 1701. James Oli
Hartford, with Hooker, was a Deacon, and d. in 1684, leaving wife Elizabeth, and children, Thomas, deem Indian captives near Wachusett; Selectman, 1684-1687, and d. 19 Nov. 1691; his w. Hepzibah and han, grad. H. C. 1661, physician in Boston, d. 1684; Israel, grad. H. C. 1661, minister of Stamfortain of Billerica, was chosen Representative in 1684, Town Clerk 20 years, and one of the most emineert Parker of Camb., who bequeathed property in 1684 to his dau. Sarah Foster. His children, at Rox. and subsequently in Chs. and to have d. about 1684. 2. William, perhaps s. of Thomas (1), by w. John the f. d. 1674, a. 79; his w. Margaret d. 1684, a. 80. 3. Edward, brother to John (2), camew. Elizabeth was living in Braintree 4 Mar. 1723-4, when she sold her life-estate in the property ou. of Abraham Jackson, and d. 1714; William, b. 1684, m. Sarah——, and d. 1744; Abigail, b. 11 Ap. 16rom the Railroad Bridge, was Selectman 1682 and 1684, and d. 20 May 1711, a. 92; his w. Rebecca d. 1[15 more...]<
r, an office in which his widow succeeded him. After his death, Father Abdy's Will, in doggerel rhyme, afforded much amusement on both sides of the Atlantic. Adams, John, was here about 1650. His children, by w. Ann, were Rebecca, bap. in England; Mary, John, Joseph, all bap. here; Hannah, bap. 17 June 1660, and d. 25 Jan. 1660-61; Daniel, bap. 14 Sept. 1662, and d. 14 May 1685. Rebecca m. Nathaniel Patten, 24 Nov. 1669, and d. 18 Dec. 1677. John rem. to Sudbury, m. Hannah Bent, had John, 1684, Daniel, 1685, Hannah, 1688, and was living in 1714. John the father resided in Menotomy, was a millwright, and d. 1706, a. about 85. His w. Ann was living in 1714. 2. Joseph, s. of John (1), received from his father a deed of the homestead, 4 Sept. 1697. He m. Margaret, dau. of Thomas Eames, 21 Feb. 1687-8, but I find no record of the birth or baptism of their children. He d. 20 July. 1701, and his w. Margaret was appointed administratrix; she was prob. the person whom. Lieut. Danie
00. He is described as of Hartford in 1671 and 1672, of Chs. in 1679, of Camb. in 1681 and 1682 (where he seems also to have resided in 1677-8), of Chs. again in 1684 to 1689, and of Boston in 1696-7, where he continued afterwards to reside, and became one of the most enterprising and wealthy merchants in the Province. He was o. 1718; Martha, b. about 1653, m. Daniel Epes, 17 Ap. 1672, and d. 9 Feb. 1692; Mary, b. 9 Mar. 1655-6; William, b. 6 Dec. 1657, was a carpenter, resided in Maiden 1684, and d. at Rumney Marsh, or Chelsea, 14 Mar. 1695-6; Elizabeth, b. 17 Aug. 1660, m. John Cooper, 28 Ap. 1686, and d. 15 Nov. 1714. William the f. d. 25 Mar. 1685,na Streets. His brother William owned 2 acres adjoining, extending eastward of Hancock Street. Mr. Butler removed to Hartford, with Hooker, was a Deacon, and d. in 1684, leaving wife Elizabeth, and children, Thomas, Samuel, Nathaniel, Joseph, Daniel, Mary Wright, Elizabeth Olmstead, and Hannah Green. (Hinman.) 2. William, broth
June 1687, m. Jonathan Wyeth and was living in 1743. Daniel the f. was appointed by the General Court, 1677, to redeem Indian captives near Wachusett; Selectman, 1684-1687, and d. 19 Nov. 1691; his w. Hepzibah and his seven children survived. 5. Samuel, s. of Samuel (3), by w. Hannah, had Hannah, bap. 27 June 1697; Mary, bap.25 July 1691; Barnabas, grad. H. C. 1657; Nathaniel, grad. H. C. 1661, minister of Hatfield, d. 4 Nov. 1685; Elnathan, grad. H. C. 1661, physician in Boston, d. 1684; Israel, grad. H. C. 1661, minister of Stamford, Conn., d. 14 Mar. 1702-3. Besides these, were two daughters, Sarah, m. Rev. Gershom Bulkeley, and Hannah. Ch, 1683, and held the office about ten years, when he was succeeded by his son. He resided on an estate adjoining the prison, west of Winthrop Square. He d. Mar. 1703-4. 2. Israel, s. of Daniel (1), m. Bridgett Woodhead 10 June 1690, and had Daniel, William, Esther, all bap. 15 Aug. 1697 (Esther m. Rev. Henry Messinger of Wrentha
olas (1), was one of the first settlers in Billerica, where he spent his long and useful life. He was the first Captain of Billerica, was chosen Representative in 1684, Town Clerk 20 years, and one of the most eminent land surveyors of his time. (Farmer.) He m. Elizabeth, dau. of John Poulter 22 Nov. 1654; she d. 7 Oct. 1689, a.dren, who survived to maturity. (1) John, who m. Martha, dau. of Dep. Gov. Samuel Symonds, and d. 1671, leaving a daughter Martha, and a son John, who grad. H. C. 1684, m. Elizabeth Saltonstall, commenced preaching at Ipswich, but died 1689, leaving an only son, John, who grad. II. C. 1710, was Sheriff of Essex Co., m. Mary, dae venerable Dr. Appleton of Cambridge, and of Margaret, wife of President Holyoke; Margaret, m. Capt. Thomas Berry, and (2d) President Leverett; John, grad. H. C. 1684, minister at Ipswich, d. 28 Dec. 1745, a. 79; Daniel, grad. H. C. 1686, a physician and Justice of the Peace, perished on Hampton Beach in a snow storm 1 Dec. 172
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