hide Matching Documents

Browsing named entities in Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.). You can also browse the collection for 17 AD or search for 17 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK II. AN ACCOUNT OF THE WORLD AND THE ELEMENTS., CHAP. 86. (81.)—WONDERFUL CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDING EARTHQUAKES. (search)
CHAP. 86. (81.)—WONDERFUL CIRCUMSTANCES ATTENDING EARTHQUAKES. Inundations of the sea take place at the same time with earthquakesSee Aristotle, Meteor. ii. 8.; the water being impregnated with the same spirit"Eodem videlicet spiritu infusi (maris) ac terræ residentis sinu recept i.", and received into the bosom of the earth which subsides. The greatest earthquake which has occurred in our memory was in the reign of TiberiusU.C. 770; A.D. 17. We have an account of this event in Strabo, xii. 57; in Tacitus, Ann. ii. 47; and in the Universal History, xiv. 129, 130. We are informed by Hardouin, that coins are still in existence which were struck to commemorate the liberality of the emperor on the occasion, inscribed "civitatibus Asiæ restitutis." Lemaire, i. 410., by which twelve cities of Asia were laid prostrate in one night. They occurred the most frequently during the Punic war, when we had accounts brought to Rome of fifty-seven earthquakes in the space of a single year. It was dur
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VI. AN ACCOUNT OF COUNTRIES, NATIONS, SEAS, TOWNS, HAVENS, MOUNTAINS, RIVERS, DISTANCES, AND PEOPLES WHO NOW EXIST, OR FORMERLY EXISTED., CHAP. 37. (32.)—THE FORTUNATE ISLANDS. (search)
ote. of the same name, and then another called Capraria, which is infested by multitudes of huge lizards. According to the same author, in sight of these islands is Ninguaria,Or "Snow Island," the same as that previously called Invallis, the modern Teneriffe, with its snow-capped peak. which has received that name from its perpetual snows; this island abounds also in fogs. The one next to it is Canaria;So called from its canine inhabitants. it contains vast multitudes of dogs of very large size, two of which were brought home to Juba: there are some traces of buildings to be seen here. While all these islands abound in fruit and birds of every kind, this one produces in great numbers the date palm which bears the caryota, also pine nuts. Honey too abounds here, and in the rivers papyrus, and the fish called silurus,As to the silurus, see B. ix. c. 17. are found. These islands, however, are greatly annoyed by the putrefying bodies of monsters, which are constantly thrown up by the sea.
Pliny the Elder, The Natural History (ed. John Bostock, M.D., F.R.S., H.T. Riley, Esq., B.A.), BOOK VIII. THE NATURE OF THE TERRESTRIAL ANIMALS., CHAP. 84. (59.)—ANIMALS WHICH INJURE STRANGERS ONLY, AS ALSO ANIMALS WHICH INJURE THE NATIVES OF THE COUNTRY ONLY, AND WHERE THEY ARE FOUND. (search)
nius Rhodius, B. iii. who wrote on Agriculture, DionysiusCassius Dionysius of Utica. He translated into Greek the twenty- eight Books on Husbandry written by Mago the Carthaginian, in the Punic language. Of Mago nothing further is known. who translated Mago, DiophanesDiophanes of Bithynia made an epitome of the same work in Greek, and dedicated it to King Deiotarus. Columella styles Mago the Father of Agriculture. who made an epitome of the work of Dionysius, King Archelaus,Made king of Cappadocia by Antony, B. C. 34. He died at Rome, at an advanced age, A.D. 17. Plutarch attributes to King Archelaus—if, indeed, this was the same—a treatise on Minerals. Nicander.A native of Claros, near Colophon, in Ionia. It is not a matter of certainty, but it is most probable, that he lived in the reign of Ptolemy V., who died B.C. 181. He was a poet, grammarian, and physician. His "Theriaca," a poem on the wounds inflicted by venomous animals, still exists, as also another called "Alexipharmia.