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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 19 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 11 11 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 5 5 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 4 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 3 3 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1706 AD or search for 1706 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abercrombie, James, 1706- (search)
Abercrombie, James, 1706- military officer; born at Glassaugh, Scotland, in 1706. In 1746 he became a colonel in the British army; was made major-general in 1756, lieutenant-general in 1759, and general in 1772. He came to America in 1756, where he held the chief military command until the arrival of Lord Loudoun. After the departure of that officer, Abercrombie resumed the command. In July, 1758, he attacked Ticonderoga (q. v.) with a large force, but was repulsed with a loss of abou1706. In 1746 he became a colonel in the British army; was made major-general in 1756, lieutenant-general in 1759, and general in 1772. He came to America in 1756, where he held the chief military command until the arrival of Lord Loudoun. After the departure of that officer, Abercrombie resumed the command. In July, 1758, he attacked Ticonderoga (q. v.) with a large force, but was repulsed with a loss of about 2,000 men. He was succeeded by General Amherst in September following; returned to England in 1759, and became a member of Parliament, wherein he advocated the obnoxious measures that led to the War of the Revolution in 1775. He died April 28, 1781, while Governor of Stirling Castle. military officer; son of Gen. James Abercrombie. He had served on the staff of General Amherst, in America, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the British army in March, 1770. While leading the British G
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bankruptcy laws, past and present. (search)
t provisions have been on the books. In view of the interest in the subject, the following chronology may be valuable. We take the English statutes first: 1. The statute of 1542 was aimed at absconding or concealed debtors only. It made them criminals, deprived them of their property without giving them a discharge, and left them to the tender mercies of their creditors. It was followed by a number of similar laws. enlarging its scope and changing its procedure. 2. The statute of 1706, in the fifth year of Queen Anne, marks the next great step in advance. Debt was no longer treated as a crime, and provision was for the first time made for a discharge. 3. The statute of 1825, in the reign of George IV., for the first time recognized voluntary bankruptcies. 4. The statute of 1830 abolished commissioners in bankruptcy, put the administration of estates into the hands of the court, and created the official assignee or receiver. 5. The statute of 1861 made it possible
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Callender, John 1706-1748 (search)
Callender, John 1706-1748 Historian; born in Boston, Mass., in 1706; graduated at Harvard College in 1723; pastor of the First Baptist Church in Newport, R. I., in 1731-48. On March 24, 1738, he delivered a public address entitled An Historical discourse on the Civil and religions affairs of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations, from the first settlement to the end of the first century. For more than 100 years this was the only history of Rhode Island. He also collected 1706; graduated at Harvard College in 1723; pastor of the First Baptist Church in Newport, R. I., in 1731-48. On March 24, 1738, he delivered a public address entitled An Historical discourse on the Civil and religions affairs of the colony of Rhode Island and Providence plantations, from the first settlement to the end of the first century. For more than 100 years this was the only history of Rhode Island. He also collected a number of papers treating of the history of the Baptists in America. He died in Newport, R. I., Jan. 26, 1748.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Castine, Vincent, Baron De 1665- (search)
ied the daughter of a Penobscot chief. By him Christianity was first introduced among the natives of that region. He gained great influence over them. During his absence in 1688, his establishment was pillaged by the English, and he became their bitter foe. He taught the Indians around him the use of fire-arms, and he frequently co-operated with them in their attacks on the northeastern frontier. In 1696, with 200 Indians, he assisted Iberville in the capture of the fort at Pemaquid. In 1706-7 he assisted in the defence of Port Royal, and was wounded. He lived in America thirty years, when he returned to France, leaving Fort Castine and the domain around it to his half-breed son and successor in title. The young baron was really a friend to the English, but, being at the head of the Penobscot Indians, and suspected of being an enemy, he was surprised and captured in 1721,. taken to Boston, and imprisoned several months. His name is perpetuated in the town of Castine, at which
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charleston, S. C. (search)
the war; and was evacuated by the Confederates on Feb. 17, 1865. On Aug. 31, 1886, a large part of the city was destroyed by an earthquake, in which many lives were lost. In the fiscal year ending June 30, 1900, the foreign trade of the port was: Imports, $1,124,671; exports, $7,151,720. In 1899 the assessed valuation of all taxable property was $17,293,458. The population in 1890 was 54,955; in 1900, 55,807. History.—Provoked by the attack on St. Augustine by the South Carolinians in 1706, the Spaniards fitted out an expedition to retaliate. It consisted of five vessels of war, under the command of the French Admiral Le Feboure, bearing a large body of troops from Havana. It was proposed to conquer the province of South Carolina and attach it to Spanish territory in Florida. The squadron crossed Charleston Bar (May, 1706), and about 800 troops were landed at different points. Then the commander made a peremptory demand for the surrender of the city, threatening to take
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eliot, Jared, 1685-1763 (search)
Eliot, Jared, 1685-1763 Educator and clergyman; born in Guilford, Conn., Nov. 7, 1685; son of Joseph and grandson of John Eliot; graduated at Yale College in 1706, and from 1709 until his death he was minister of the first church at Killingworth, Conn. He was a most practical and useful man, and did much for the advancement of agriculture and manufactures in New England. He strongly urged in essays the introduction into the colonies of a better breed of sheep. In 1747 he wrote: A better breed of sheep is what we want. The English breed of Cotswold sheep cannot be obtained, or at least not without great difficulty; for wool and live sheep are contraband goods, which all strangers are prohibited from carrying out on pain of having the right hand cut off. In 1761 the London Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce honored him with its medal, for producing malleable iron from American black sand, and he was made a member of the Royal Society of London. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 Statesman; born in Boston, Jan. 17, 1706. His father was from England; his mother was a daughter of Peter Folger, the Quaker poet of Nantucket. He learned the art of printing with his brother; but they disagreeing, Benjamin left Boston when seventeen years of age, sought employment in New York, but, not succeeding, went to Philadelphia, and there found it. He soon attracted the attention of Governor Keith as a very bright lad, who, making him a promise of the government printing, induced young Franklin, at the age of eighteen, to go to England and purchase printing material. He was deceived, and remained there eighteen months, working as a journeyman printer in London. He returned to Philadelphia late in 1726, and in 1729 established himself there as a printer. He started the Pennsylvania gazette, and married Deborah Read, a young woman whose husband had absconded. For many years he published an almanac under the assumed name of Richard Saunders
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Insurance. (search)
by The Spectator Company. They do not include the returns of a few stock companies and some 600 mutuals and town and county mutuals, whose transactions are purely local and individually of small volume.$18,000,000,000 160 Mutual. In 1900 the aggregate property loss by fires was $138,000,000, and the aggregate insurance loss was $82,000,000. Life insurance was not known before the sixteenth century. The first life insurance company, The amicable, was established in London, England, in 1706, and insured at uniform rates persons between twelve and forty-five years of age. In 1734 it guaranteed a dividend for each deceased member not less than £ 100. This was the first insurance for a definite sum at death, whenever that might occur. In 1762 the Equitable Assurance Society of London began to rate members according to age. At the close of the eighteenth century there were eight companies transacting, in a more or less complete form, the business of life insurance in Great Britain
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Sir Nathaniel -1713 (search)
Johnson, Sir Nathaniel -1713 Colonial governor of South Carolina in 1703-9. During his administration he defeated the French who had attacked the colony in 1706. He died in Charleston in 1713.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Oliver, Andrew 1706-1774 (search)
Oliver, Andrew 1706-1774 Governor; born in Boston, March 28, 1706; graduated at Harvard in 1724; a representative in the General Court from 1743 to 1746; one of his Majesty's council from 1746 to 1765; secretary of the province from 1756 to 1770; and succeeded Hutchinson (his brother-inlaw) as lieutenant-governor. In 1765 he was hung in effigy because he was a stamp distributer, and his course in opposition to the patriotic party in Boston caused him to share the unpopularity of Hutchinson. His letters, with those of Hutchinson, were sent by Franklin to Boston, and created great commotion there. He died in Boston, March 3, 1774. See Hutchinson, Thomas.
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