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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 60 60 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 1 1 Browse Search
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P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various), A Note on the Translations (search)
A Note on the Translations The first book of the Art of Love was translated by John Dryden (1631-1700). Dryden did not finish the translation; it was completed by William Congreve (1670-1729). The Remedy of Love was translated by Nahum Tate (1652-1715), Poet Laureate of England from 1692. The original edition of these translations was published by Jacob and Richard Tonson, London, 1709, along with the Court of Love and the History of Love. The Amores here are taken from a collection called Miscellany Poems (or Dryden's Miscellany), published as a series by Jacob Tonson from 1684 on. These translations were reprinted several times in England and the US through the 18th and 19th c.. The other poets represented here were all colleagues of Dryden's, from the group of "Court Poets" of the Restoration. Thomas Creech, 1659-1700, published translations of various classical authors as well as original poems. He is best known for his 1682 translation of Lucretius. Henry Cromwell, b. 16
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
aving the hostile army of Tschkokoff in his rear, he pushed on to Moscow, and when the conflagration of that city cut off his hopes of winter quarters-there, and the premature rigor of the season destroyed the horses of his artillery and provision-trains, retreat became impossible, and the awful fate of his immense army was closed by scenes of horror to which there is scarcely a parallel in history. This point might be still further illustrated by the Russian campaign of Charles XII., in 1708-9, the fatal advance of the French army on Lisbon, in the Peninsular war, and other examples of the same character. Even single works sometimes effect the object of lines of fortifications, and frustrate the operations of an entire army. Thus, Lille suspended for a whole year the operations of Prince Eugene and Marlborough; the siege of Landrecies gave Villars an opportunity of changing the fortunes of the war; Pavia, in 1525, lost France her monarch, the flower of her nobility, and her Ital
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 8: our northern frontier defences.—Brief description of the fortifications on the frontier, and an analysis of our northern campaigns. (search)
rmer advanced as far as the lake, when the quarrels of the commanding officers defeated the objects of the expedition. The Massachusetts fleet of thirty-four vessels, (the largest carrying forty-four guns each,) and two thousand men, failed to reduce Quebec, though the defences of that place were then of the slightest character, and armed with only twenty-three guns. In 1704, and again in 1707, Port Royal was attacked by costly expeditions fitted out by the eastern colonies; and again, in 1709, a land force of fifteen hundred men advanced against Montreal by Lake Champlain; but nothing of importance was effected by either expedition. In 1711, Lord Bolingbroke planned the conquest of Canada. The land forces, numbering five thousand men in all, were separated into two distinct armies, the one sent against Detroit, and the other against Montreal by Lake Champlain; while a fleet of fifteen ships of war, forty transports, and six store-ships, carrying a land force of six thousand fi
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 14: field-engineering.—Field Fortifications.—Military Communications.—Military Bridges.—Sapping, Mining, and the attack and defence of a fortified place (search)
ldeck exposed himself to a most disastrous defeat by neglecting the resources of fortification and other indispensable precautions; to the battle of Malplaquet, in 1709, where Marshal Villars, by neglecting to occupy and intrench the farm that closed the passage between the woods of Sars and Laniere, exposed himself to a disastrouthe passage of the Seine in 1465 by Count Charolais; the passage of the Meuse in 1579 by Alexander Farnese; the passage of the Vistula in 1704, the Borysthenese in 1709, and the Sound in 1718, by Charles XII.; the passage of the Adige in 1796; the passage of the Po in 1807; and the subsequent military operations in the Spanish Pen, the Piava, &c., in 1800 ; the passages of these rivers again in 1805; the passages of the Narew, in 1807, by the Russians; the several passages of the Danube, in 1709, by the French and Austrian armies; the passages of the Ta.. gus and Douro, in 1810; by the English ; the passages of the Niemen, the Dwina, the Moskwa, and the Be
n Hall1693. Nathaniel Wade1694. Jonathan Tufts1695. Nathaniel Wade1696. Peter Tufts1698. Nathaniel Wade1699. Peter Tufts1700. Nathaniel Wade1703. Peter Tufts1705. Nathaniel Wade1706. Stephen Francis1707. Stephen Willis1708. John Francis1709. Ebenezer Brooks1710. John Bradshaw1711. John Whitmore1712. Thomas Willis1713. Stephen Willis1714. Jonathan Tufts1715. Samuel Wade1717. Thomas Tufts1718. John Bradshaw1719. Jonathan Tufts1721. John Bradshaw1722. Thomas Tufts1723. Eben1. Timothy Cotting1844. Alexander Gregg1845. Henry Withington1847. Peter C. Hall1849. James O. Curtis1850. Peter C. Hall1853. Benjamin H. Samson1855. Names of the treasurers. Stephen Willis1696. John Bradstreet1700. Samuel Wade1709. John Whitmore1714. William Willis1725. John Richardson1727. Edward Brooks1728. Samuel Brooks1729. Stephen Hall1733. Edward Brooks1735. Benjamin Parker1743. Edward Brooks1750. Thomas Brooks1756. Aaron Hall1761. Thomas Brooks1763. Jame
resolved to hear candidates with reference to ordination. The town also concluded to have a contribution each Sunday, and thus pay the minister at the end of the day; and voted that each person should previously write down, on a rate-bill, what he will contribute each Sunday. The persons who gathered these contributions were appointed from among the most trustworthy of the congregation. The great watchfulness of our fathers in these money-matters is seen in a vote passed at this period (1709). It is as follows:-- Voted to call Mr. John Whitmore to an account by what order he held out the contribution-box, and how he disposed of the money that was put therein. March 6, 1710: Voted to apply to Mr. John Whiting, Fellow of Harvard College, to preach for three months. This gentleman refused; and Mr. John Tufts was engaged for six months. At the end of this time, July 17, 1710, he engaged to supply the pulpit six months longer. The town now proposed a free contribution, in conn
y thing of this sort happened to John Man, we do not know; but we do know that Cambridge and Medford did contend stoutly that the living man did not belong to them. When the question of habitancy arose, the justice of the King's Court would cite the towns interested in the case, and require from them the fullest proofs in every particular; and, when a town got rid of a pauper, it seemed to call forth a general thanksgiving. The final decision gave the pauper in this case to Medford; and, in 1709, the town passed a vote to put him to board at Samuel Polly's, at three shillings a week. But their beneficiary must have something more than board; therefore we soon find the town furnishing one coat for John Man, £ 1.13s.; one pair of stockings, 4s. That his clothes wore out, we have record-proof in the following item: Oct. 27, 1713: Voted a pair of leather breeches, a pair of shoes and stockings, to John Man. 1718: Voted to defend the town against vagrants, and to prevent their coming t
afterwards judge; m. Joanna, dau. of Aaron Cook, of Hadley. He d. July 29, 1722, aged 62, leaving three sons and four daughters.  3-4Rev. Aaron Porter, second son and third child of the last, was b. July 19, 1689. Grad. H. C., 1708; and m., in 1709, Susanna Sewall, sister of the chief justice; and had--  4-5Aaron, b. July 9, 1714; d. young.  6Susanna, b. Mar. 1, 1716; m., Aug. 4, 1739, Rev. A. Cleveland.  7Margaret, b. July 18, 1717.  8Joanna, b. Mar. 22, 1719; m., Jan. 1, 1735, Josiah C1758.  251Daniel, b. Mar. 30, 1759.  252Abigail, b. July 24, 1761.  253Mercy, b. Sept. 21, 1765.   He d. June 12, 1769, aged 67.   Peter Tufts (No. 2) is said to have had (B) two children besides those previously recorded:--  2-254Samuel, b. 1709.  255William, b. 1713. 2-254Samuel Tufts m.--------, and had--  254-256Anna, b. 1744. 2-255William Tufts m., 1st, Catherine Wyman, who d. 1749; and had--  255-256 1/2Catharine, b. Mar. 31, 1734.  257William, b. Mar. 27, 1736.  25
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Copper. (search)
Copper. There are evidences that copper-mines were worked in the United States by the Mound-builders (q. v.). The first mines worked systematically were chiefly in New Jersey and Connecticut. From 1709 until the middle of the eighteenth century, a mine at Simsbury, Conn., yielded much ore, when, for about sixty years, the mine was a State prison. The Lake Superior copper-mines (the most considerable in the world) were first worked, in modern times, in 1845, when traces of ancient mining were found near the Ontonagon River. The Jesuit missionaries had noticed copper ore in that region as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. In making excavations in 1848, a mass of copper, supported upon blocks of wood, with charred wood under it, was found 20 feet below the surface. When taken out it weighed 8 tons. The output of copper in the United States during the calendar year 1899 amounted to 585,342,124 pounds, valued at $104,190,898. In that and the following year the outpu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Du Lhut, or Duluth, Daniel Greysolon 1678- (search)
Du Lhut, or Duluth, Daniel Greysolon 1678- Explorer; born in Lyons, France; carried on a traffic in furs under the protection of Count Frontenac; explored the upper Mississippi in 1678-80, at which time he joined Father Hennepin and his companions. He took part in the campaign against the Seneca Indians in 1687 and brought with him a large number of Indians from the upper lakes. In 1695 he was placed in command of Fort Frontenac and in 1697 was promoted to the command of a company of infantry. He died near Lake Superior in 1709. The city of Duluth was named after him.
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