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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 60 60 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1709 AD or search for 1709 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 16 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Copper. (search)
Copper. There are evidences that copper-mines were worked in the United States by the Mound-builders (q. v.). The first mines worked systematically were chiefly in New Jersey and Connecticut. From 1709 until the middle of the eighteenth century, a mine at Simsbury, Conn., yielded much ore, when, for about sixty years, the mine was a State prison. The Lake Superior copper-mines (the most considerable in the world) were first worked, in modern times, in 1845, when traces of ancient mining were found near the Ontonagon River. The Jesuit missionaries had noticed copper ore in that region as early as the middle of the seventeenth century. In making excavations in 1848, a mass of copper, supported upon blocks of wood, with charred wood under it, was found 20 feet below the surface. When taken out it weighed 8 tons. The output of copper in the United States during the calendar year 1899 amounted to 585,342,124 pounds, valued at $104,190,898. In that and the following year the outpu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Du Lhut, or Duluth, Daniel Greysolon 1678- (search)
Du Lhut, or Duluth, Daniel Greysolon 1678- Explorer; born in Lyons, France; carried on a traffic in furs under the protection of Count Frontenac; explored the upper Mississippi in 1678-80, at which time he joined Father Hennepin and his companions. He took part in the campaign against the Seneca Indians in 1687 and brought with him a large number of Indians from the upper lakes. In 1695 he was placed in command of Fort Frontenac and in 1697 was promoted to the command of a company of infantry. He died near Lake Superior in 1709. The city of Duluth was named after him.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eliot, Jared, 1685-1763 (search)
Eliot, Jared, 1685-1763 Educator and clergyman; born in Guilford, Conn., Nov. 7, 1685; son of Joseph and grandson of John Eliot; graduated at Yale College in 1706, and from 1709 until his death he was minister of the first church at Killingworth, Conn. He was a most practical and useful man, and did much for the advancement of agriculture and manufactures in New England. He strongly urged in essays the introduction into the colonies of a better breed of sheep. In 1747 he wrote: A better breed of sheep is what we want. The English breed of Cotswold sheep cannot be obtained, or at least not without great difficulty; for wool and live sheep are contraband goods, which all strangers are prohibited from carrying out on pain of having the right hand cut off. In 1761 the London Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce honored him with its medal, for producing malleable iron from American black sand, and he was made a member of the Royal Society of London. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frye, James 1709- (search)
Frye, James 1709- Military officer; born in Andover, Mass., in 1709; served in several local offices, and in the army at the capture of Louisburg in 1755. At the opening of the Revolution he commanded the Essex Regiment (Massachusetts), taking an active part in the battle of Bunker Hill. He afterwards commanded a brigade of the army investing Boston. He died Jan. 8, 1776. Frye, James 1709- Military officer; born in Andover, Mass., in 1709; served in several local offices, and in the army at the capture of Louisburg in 1755. At the opening of the Revolution he commanded the Essex Regiment (Massachusetts), taking an active part in the battle of Bunker Hill. He afterwards commanded a brigade of the army investing Boston. He died Jan. 8, 1776.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hickcox, John Howard 1832- (search)
Hickcox, John Howard 1832- Librarian; born in Albany, N. Y., Aug. 10, 1832; received an academic education; worked in the Congressional Library at Washington, D. C., in 1874-82. His publications include An Historical account of American coinage; History of the bills of credit, or paper money, issued by New York from 1709 to 1789; Bibliography of the writings of Dr. Franklin B. Hough; and Catalogue of United States government publications.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jacobs, Henry Eyster 1844- (search)
Jacobs, Henry Eyster 1844- Theologian; born in Gettysburg, Pa., Nov. 10, 1844; graduated at Pennsylvania College in 1862, and at the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Gettysburg, in 1865; became Professor of Systematic Theology at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in 1888. He is the author of History of the Lutheran Church in America; The German emigration to America. 1709–;40, et
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jesuit missions. (search)
with the Senecas after 1672, where he was in 1679. Jean de Lamberville was at Onondaga in 1671-72; was sent to Niagara in 1687. Francis Boniface was sent to the Mohawks in 1668, and was there after 1673. Francis Vaillant de Gueslis succeeded Boniface among the Mohawks about 1674: accompanied the expedition against the Senecas in 1687; was sent to New York in December, 1687, and to the Senecas in 1703. Pierre de Mareuil was at Onondaga in June, 1709, where he surrendered himself to the English in consequence of war breaking out between the latter and the French, and was courteously treated at Albany. Jacques d'heu was among the Onondagas in 1708, and the Senecas in 1709. Anthony Gordon founded St. Regis in 1769, with a colony from St. Louis. There were two Sulpicians as missionaries in northern New York, Francis Piquet, who founded Oswegatchie (Ogdensburg) in 1748, and his successor at Oswegatchie, Pierre Paul Francis de la Garde. For Jesuit missions in California, see Junipero.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Sir Nathaniel -1713 (search)
Johnson, Sir Nathaniel -1713 Colonial governor of South Carolina in 1703-9. During his administration he defeated the French who had attacked the colony in 1706. He died in Charleston in 1713.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
rd Calvert1647 to 1648 Thomas Greene1648 to 1654 William Stone1654 to 1658 1658 to 1660 Josias Fendall1660 to 1662 Philip Calvert1662 to 1676 Charles Calvert1677 to 1680 Thomas Notley1681 to 1689 Charles, Lord Baltimore1681 to 1689 Under the English government (Royal). John Coode and the Protestant association1690 to 1692 Sir Lionel Copley1692 to 1693 Francis Nicholson1694 to 1695 Nathaniel Blackstone1696 to 1702 Thomas Trench1703 to 1704 John Seymour1704 to 1708 Edward Lloyd1709 to 1713 John Hart1714 to 1715 Under the Baltimores restored (proprietary). John Hart1715 to 1719 Charles Calvert1720 to 1726 Benedict L. Calvert1727 to 1730 Samuel Ogle1731 to 1732 Charles, Lord Baltimore1732 to 1733 Samuel Ogle1734 to 1741 Thomas Bladen1742 to 1745 Samuel Ogle1746 to 1751 Benjamin Tasker1752 Horatio Sharpe1753 to 1768 Robert Eden1769 to 1774 Under the Continental Congress. Thomas Johnson1777 to 1779 Thomas Sim Lee1780 to 1782 William Paca1783 to 1784 Wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
lony six years, when his rapacity and corruption could no longer be endured, and he was seized and banished. Perfect quiet was not restored until the Quaker John Archdale came as governor in 1695, when the colony started on a prosperous career. In 1705 Thomas Carey was appointed governor, but was afterwards removed, whereupon he incited a rebellion, and, at the head of an armed force, attacked Edenton, the capital. The insurrection was suppressed (1711) by regular troops from Virginia. In 1709 100 German families, driven from their desolated homes in the palatinates on the Rhine, penetrated the interior of North Carolina. They were led by Count Graffenreidt, and founded settlements along the head-waters of the Neuse and upon the Roanoke, with the count as governor. They had just begun to gather the fruits of their industry, when suddenly, in the night of Oct. 2, 1711, the Tuscarora Indians and others fell upon them like lightning, and before the dawn 130 persons perished by the h
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