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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 60 60 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 5 5 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. 5 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for 1709 AD or search for 1709 AD in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the historians, 1607-1783 (search)
He had a deep interest in the superior organization of the Iroquois and wrote about them in his History of the five Indian nations (1727-47). Through great industry he collected a large amount of valuable information about these Indians, and the book is still a mine of facts, although the research of later times has rendered many of its statements unsatisfactory. In this connection mention should be made of John Lawson's History of North Carolina, published first as New voyage to Carolina in 1709. It was written by a man of excellent sense who had opportunity to know the Indians and natural resources of North Carolina, but it contains little about civil affairs. Lawson was English born and bred, and lived only a few years after his arrival, but he had a right to the name American, since he gave his life to the service of the colony. He was murdered by the Indians in 1711. It seems certain that most of the books on the Indians were written in answer to a popular demand. The same
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
ured by the laboured insincerity of his style. But the nadir is reached by the Rev. Nicholas Noyes (1647-1717), who in his elegies on the Rev. John Higginson and the Rev. Joseph Green shows promising possibilities of bathos, but who in his poem on the Rev. James Brayley's attack of the stone revels in such a plethora of conceits and puns as to put to the blush his most gifted English contemporaries. The one elegiac poem of early New England that may be worth preserving is the Funeral song (1709), written by the Rev. Samuel Wigglesworth, son of Michael, on the death of his friend Nathaniel Clarke. Together with its real feeling, it exhibits a certain felicity of diction that bespeaks Elizabethan models; and such phrases as where increate eternity's concealed, solemn music, and warbling divinest airs, seem to show that Milton had reached New England. As a genre the elegy died with the decline of the clergy, and passed as a fashion passes with changed conditions. The most interest
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Jackson, Richard, 97 James, William, 348 Jane Talbot, 292 Jay, John, 91, 135, 144, 146, 148, 149, 294 Jefferson, Joseph (elder), 221, 231 Jefferson, (younger), 231 Jefferson, Thomas, 91, 129, 141, 142, 143, 146, 175, 185, 190, 194, 199, 201, 202, 203, 205 Jeffrey, Lord, 90, 248 Jenyns, Soame, 129 Jesus, 268, 353 Jeune Indienne, La, 188 Joan D'arc, 226 John Bull in America, etc., 208 John Oldbug, 234 Johnson, Captain, Edward, 22-23 Johnson, Dr. Samuel (1709-84), 70, 82, 94, 233, 288 Johnson, Rev. Samuel (1696-1772), 81-86 Jonathan in England, 228 Jonathan Oldstyle, 233 Jones, Joseph S., 224 n., 228 Jonson, Ben, 150-151 Joseph Dennie and his circle, 233 n. Journal (N. Y.), 149 Journal (Patrick Gass), 205 Journal (Woolman), 86, 87 n., 88 n. Journal kept by John Bartram of Journal of the Continental Congress, 144 Journal of the Federal Convention, 146 Journal of the taking of Cape Breton, a, 9 Journals (Eme