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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nelson, William 1847-1772 (search)
Nelson, William 1847-1772 Historian; born in Newark, N. J., Feb. 10, 1847; practised law in New Jersey since 1865; member of many historical and scientific societies Mr. Nelson is the editor of the New Jersey archives, and the author of The Indians of New Jersey; The Doremus family; History of Paterson, N. J., etc Colonial governor; born in Yorktown, Va., in 1711; held a seat in the executive council of which he was later president. He was governor of Virginia during the interval between the incumbency of Lord Botetourt and Lord Dunmore, and presided over the Supreme Court of Law of the Province. He died in Yorktown, Va., Nov 19, 1772 Military officer; born in Maysville, Ky., in 1825; entered the United States navy in 1840; was at the siege of Vera Cruz in 1847; and afterwards served in the Mediterranean. He was ordered into the military service in Kentucky by the government in 1861, with the rank of brigadier-general of volunteers; was successful in raising troops,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nivelles, Charles ÉTienne de 1665- (search)
Nivelles, Charles ÉTienne de 1665- Military officer; born in Dauphine, France, about 1665; served for several years in Canada; and then went to Louisiana. In 1699 he was one of the founders of Biloxi, the first French colony in Louisiana; in 1705 when yellow fever occurred there he kept the colonists from dispersing. Later when the women rebelled against the diet of Indian corn he aided in putting down the rebellion, which was dubbed the petticoat insurrection. He was drowned in the great flood of 1711.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Carolina, State of (search)
orth Carolina as governor. He ruled the colony six years, when his rapacity and corruption could no longer be endured, and he was seized and banished. Perfect quiet was not restored until the Quaker John Archdale came as governor in 1695, when the colony started on a prosperous career. In 1705 Thomas Carey was appointed governor, but was afterwards removed, whereupon he incited a rebellion, and, at the head of an armed force, attacked Edenton, the capital. The insurrection was suppressed (1711) by regular troops from Virginia. In 1709 100 German families, driven from their desolated homes in the palatinates on the Rhine, penetrated the interior of North Carolina. They were led by Count Graffenreidt, and founded settlements along the head-waters of the Neuse and upon the Roanoke, with the count as governor. They had just begun to gather the fruits of their industry, when suddenly, in the night of Oct. 2, 1711, the Tuscarora Indians and others fell upon them like lightning, and be
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Quebec. (search)
from landing near the city by a gale, he debarked a large body of his troops at the Isle of Orleans, about 3 miles below the town, where they were attacked by the French and Indians. There the English remained until the 11th, when a deserter gave them such an account of the strength of Quebec that Phipps abandoned the enterprise, hastily re-embarked his troops, and crawled back to Boston with his whole fleet, after it had been dispersed by a tempest. After the reduction of Port Royal, in 1711, Colonel Nicholson went again to England to solicit an expedition against Canada. The ministry acceded to his proposal, and a sufficient armament was ordered for the grand enterprise. Nicholson hastened back, gave notice to the colonies, and prepared for the invasion of Canada by sea and land. Admiral Walker commanded the fleet of sixty-eight vessels of war and transports, bearing about 7,000 men. When the ships arrived at the mouth of the St. Lawrence, after loitering by the way, they we
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ruggles, Timothy 1711-1795 (search)
Ruggles, Timothy 1711-1795 Jurist; born in Rochester, Mass., Oct. 20, 1711; was at the battle of Lake George at the head of a brigade, and was second in command. The next year (1756) he was made a judge of the court of common pleas, and was chiefjustice of that court from 1762 until the Revolution. In 1762 he was speaker of the Assembly, and for many years an active member of that body. He was a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress, and was made its president, but refused to concur in its measures. For this act the legislature reprimanded him. On account of his Toryism he took refuge in Boston, where, in 1775, he tried without success to raise a corps of loyalists. When the British evacuated Boston (March, 1776) he went with the troops to Halifax, and became one of the proprietors of the town of Digby, N. S. He was a man of great ability and learning, and fluent in speech. He died in Wilmot, N. S., Aug. 4, 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, Robert 1757-1842 (search)
Smith, Robert 1757-1842 Statesman; born in Lancaster, Pa., in November, 1757; graduated at Princeton College in 1781. During the Revolutionary War he participated in the battle of Brandywine as a volunteer; was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates in 1796-1800; Secretary of the Navy in 1802-5; United States Attorney-General in 1805-9; and Secretary of State in 1809-11. He died in Baltimore, Md., Nov. 26, 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Teganissorens, 1693-1711 (search)
Teganissorens, 1693-1711 An Iroquois Indian chief; born in Onondaga, N. Y.; became a strong ally of the French; was converted to Christianity in 1693; and in the following year visited Frontenac, the French governor, to whom he proposed the rehabilitation of Fort Catarocouy (Kingston), which appeared to Frontenac as a wise poed both English and French agents, to whom he declared that he would remain neutral, and thereafter strongly protested against attacks on the English settlers. In 1711 he gave information to the French that preparations were being made in New York, Boston, and Albany for the invasion of Canada. He died in Caughnawaga, or Sault Srench agents, to whom he declared that he would remain neutral, and thereafter strongly protested against attacks on the English settlers. In 1711 he gave information to the French that preparations were being made in New York, Boston, and Albany for the invasion of Canada. He died in Caughnawaga, or Sault St. Louis, after 1711.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 (search)
Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 Clergyman; born in Laugharne, Wales, in 1711; educated at Oxford, he took orders, and was for many years a rector in Bristol; in 1758 he was Dean of Gloucester; he was a prolific writer on political and religious subjects, and published several tracts on the dispute between Great Britain and the American colonies, which attracted much attention. The British ministry knew more of the differences of opinion in the Continental Congress than did the Americans, for G1711; educated at Oxford, he took orders, and was for many years a rector in Bristol; in 1758 he was Dean of Gloucester; he was a prolific writer on political and religious subjects, and published several tracts on the dispute between Great Britain and the American colonies, which attracted much attention. The British ministry knew more of the differences of opinion in the Continental Congress than did the Americans, for Galloway had let out the secret to friends of the crown. This fact encouraged Lord Seal and signature of Tryon. North and his colleagues to believe that a little firmness on the part of Great Britain would shake the resolution and break up the apparent union of the colonists. It was known that a large portion of the most respectable and influential of the inhabitants of the colonies were warmly attached to the mother-country. In several colonies there was a strong prejudice felt towards New
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tuscarora Indians, (search)
Tuscarora Indians, A tribe of the Iroquois Confederacy, who were separated from their kindred at an early day, and were seated in North Carolina when the Europeans came. They were divided into seven clans, and at the beginning of the eighteenth century occupied fifteen villages and had 1,200 warriors. They attempted to exterminate the white people in North Carolina in 1711, but troops that came to the aid of the assailed from South Carolina chastised them in a battle fought near the Neuse (Jan. 28, 1712), killing and wounding 400 of them. They made peace, but soon broke it. At war again in 1713, they were subdued by Colonel Moore, of South Carolina, at their fort near Snow-hill (March 20), who captured 800 of them. The remaining Tuscaroras fled northward, and joined their kindred of the Iroquois Confederacy, constituting the sixth nation of that league. In 1899 there were 388 Tuscaroras at the New York agency.
, a village a few miles above Kaskaskia......1719 Pierre Duque Boisbriant, sent by the Western Company, builds Fort Chartres on the east side of the Mississippi, 22 miles from Kaskaskia......1720 Jesuits establish a monastery and college at Kaskaskia......1721 Kaskaskia becomes an incorporated town......1725 Renault sells his slaves to the French colonists in Illinois......1744 Fort Massac, or Massacre, on the Ohio, about 40 miles from its mouth, established by the French about 1711, is enlarged and garrisoned......1756 British flag raised over Fort Chartres......Oct. 10, 1765 Colonel Wilkins, sent to Fort Chartres to govern the Illinois country, assumes by proclamation the civil administration, appointing seven magistrates or judges......Nov. 21, 1768 First court held in Illinois opens at Fort Chartres......Dec. 6, 1768 Land grant of 30,000 acres in the present county of Randolph made by Colonel Wilkins to John Baynton, Samuel Wharton, and George Morgan, me
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