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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 51 51 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 33 33 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 10 10 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 4 4 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 3 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909 2 2 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. 2 2 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1712 AD or search for 1712 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 28 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 (search)
Barnwell, John, 1671-1724 Military officer; born in Ireland, about 1671; in 1712, with a regiment of 600 Carolinians and several hundred friendly Indians, killed 300 of the warring Tuscaroras in the first engagement and drove the survivors into their fortified town, where they were finally reduced to submission. Over 1,000 of them were killed or captured, and the remnant joined the Five Nations of New York. He died in Beaufort, S. C., in 1724.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boehler, Peter, 1712-1775 (search)
Boehler, Peter, 1712-1775 Clergyman: born in Frankfort, Germany, Dec. 31, 1712: was graduated at Jena in 1736; ordained a Moravian minister in 1737; and was sent as an evangelist to Carolina and Georgia in 1738. On his way he became acquainted with John and Charles Wesley, upon whom he exercised great influence. Indeed. John Wesley records in his diary that Boehler was the person through whom he was brought to believe in Christ. The Moravian colony in Georgia was broken up and removed to Pennsylvania in 1740. He was consecrated bishop in 1748 and superintended the Moravian churches in America in 1 753-64, when he was recalled to Germany. He died in London, England, April 27, 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chippewa Indians, (search)
red bands on the shores and islands of the upper lakes, first discovered by the French in 1640 at the Sault Ste. Marie, when they numbered about 2,000. They were then at war with the Iroquois, the Foxes, and the Sioux; and they drove the latter from the head-waters of the Mississippi and from the Red River of the North. The French established missionaries among them, and the Chippewas were the firm friends of these Europeans until the conquest of Canada ended French dominion in America. In 1712 they aided the French in repelling an attack of the Foxes on Detroit. In Pontiac's conspiracy (see Pontiac) they were his confederates; and they sided with the British in the war of the Revolution and of 1812. Joining the Miamis, they fought Wayne and were defeated, and subscribed to the treaty at Greenville in 1795. In 1816 they took part in the pacification of the Northwestern tribes, and in 1817 they gave up all their lands in Ohio. At that time they occupied a vast and undefined t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colden, Cadwallader 1688- (search)
Colden, Cadwallader 1688- Physician; born in Dunse, Scotland, Feb. 17, 1688; graduated at the University of Edinburgh in 1705, and became a physician and Cadwallader Colden. mathematician. In 1708 he emigrated to Pennsylvania, and returned to his native country in 1712. He came again to America in 1716, and in 1718 made his abode in New York, where he was made first surveyor-general of the colony, became a master in chancery, and, in 1720, obtained a seat in Governor Burnet's council. He received a patent for lands in Orange county, N. Y., about 10 miles from Newburg, and there he went to reside in 1755. Becoming president of the council, he administered the government in 1760, and was made lieutenantgovernor in 1761, which station he held until his death, being repeatedly placed at the head of affairs by the absence or death of governors. During the Stamp Act excitement the populace burned his coach. After the return of Governor Tryon in 1775, he retired to his seat on L
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fleet, Thomas 1685- (search)
Fleet, Thomas 1685- Printer; born in England, Sept. 8, 1685; became a printer in Bristol, England, but emigrated to Boston, Mass., in 1712, where he established a printing-office. He married Elizabeth Goose, June 8, 1715. In 1719 he conceived the idea of publishing the songs which his mother-in-law had been singing to his infant son. The book was issued under the title of Songs for the nursery; Or, mother Goose's Melodies for children. Printed by T. Fleet, at his printing-house, pudding Lane, 1719. Price, two coppers. In connection with his printing-office he established the Weekly rehearsal, which was afterwards changed in title to Boston evening post. He continued as proprietor and editor of this paper until his death, July 21, 1758.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Grenville, George 1712- (search)
Grenville, George 1712- Statesman; born in England, Oct. 14, 1712. A graduate of Cambridge University, a fine mathematician, and a student of law, he gave promise of much usefulness. Entering Parliament in 1741, he represented Buckinghamshire for twenty-nine years, until his death, Nov. 13, 1770. In 1762 he was made secretary of state; chancellor of the exchequer and first lord of the treasury in 1763; and in 1764 he proposed the famous Stamp act (q. v.). He was the best business man in the House of Commons, but his statesmanship was narrow. Thomas Grenville, who was one of the agents employed in negotiating the treaty of peace in 1783, was his son.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Habersham, James 1712-1775 (search)
Habersham, James 1712-1775 Statesman; born in Beverly, England, in 1712; emigrated to Georgia in 1738; was appointed councillor and secretary of the province in 1754; president of the Assembly in 1767; and was acting governor of Georgia during the absence of Sir James Wright from 1769 to 1772. He was the first person to plant cotton in Georgia. He died in New Brunswick, N. J., Aug. 28, 1775. Habersham, James 1712-1775 Statesman; born in Beverly, England, in 1712; emigrated to Georgia in 1738; was appointed councillor and secretary of the province in 1754; president of the Assembly in 1767; and was acting governor of Georgia during the absence of Sir James Wright from 1769 to 1772. He was the first person to plant cotton in Georgia. He died in New Brunswick, N. J., Aug. 28, 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Habersham, Joseph 1751-1775 (search)
Habersham, Joseph 1751-1775 Statesman; born in Savannah, Ga., July 28, 1751. His father, James, who was born in England in 1712, and died at New Brunswick, N. J., in 1775, accompanied Whitefield to Georgia in 1738, and was secretary of the province in 1754; president of the council and acting governor in 1769-72. Joseph was a member of the first patriotic committee in Georgia in 1774, and ever afterwards took an active part in the defence of the liberties of his country. He helped to seize gunpowder in the arsenal Joseph Habersham. in 1775, and was a member of the council of safety. He was one of a company who captured a government ship (July, 1775), with munitions of war, including 15,000 lbs. of gunpowder. He led some volunteers who made the royal governor, Wright, a prisoner (Jan. 18, 1776), and confined him to his house under a guard. When Savannah was taken by the British, early in 1778, he took his family to Virginia; but in the siege of Savannah (1779) by Lincoln
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Illinois Indians, (search)
badly defeated by the Iroquois, losing about 1,300, of whom 900 were prisoners: and they retaliated by assisting the French, under De la Barre and De Nonville, against the Five Nations. The Illinois were converted to Christianity by Father Marquette and other missionaries, and in 1700 Chicago, their great chief, visited France, where he was much caressed. His son, of the same name, maintained great influence in the tribe until his death, in 1754. When Detroit was besieged by the Foxes, in 1712, the Illinois went to its relief, and in the war that followed they suffered severely. Some of them were with the French at Fort Duquesne; but they refused to join Pontiac in his conspiracy. With the Miamis, they favored the English in the war of the Revolution, and joined in the treaty at Greenville in 1795. By the provision of treaties they ceded their lands, and a greater portion of them went to a country west of the Mississippi, within the present limits of Kansas, where they remaine
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kickapoos, (search)
Kickapoos, An Algonquian tribe found by the French missionaries, towards the close of the seventeenth century, on the Wisconsin River. They were great rovers; were closely allied to the Miamis; and in 1712 joined the Foxes in an attack upon Detroit, and in wars long afterwards. They were reduced in 1747 to about eighty warriors, and when the English conquered Canada in 1763 there were about 100 Kickapoos on the Wabash. They joined Pontiac in his conspiracy, but soon made peace; and in 1779 they joined George Rogers Clarke in his expedition against the British in the Northwest. Showing hostility to the Americans, their settlement on the Wabash was desolated in 1791; but they were not absolutely subdued until the treaty at Greenville in 1795, after Wayne's decisive victory, when they ceded a part of their land for a small annuity. In the early part of the nineteenth century the Kickapoos made other cessions of territory; and in 1811 they joined Tecumseh and fought the America
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