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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 92 92 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 60 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 15 15 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley. You can also browse the collection for 1725 AD or search for 1725 AD in all documents.

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James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 1: the Scotch-Irish of New Hampshire. (search)
ind the rate in dollars or sterling money, for his yearly stipend, if he is our ordained minister. And what number of Sabbath days, annually, we shall think ourselves not able to pay him, he shall have at his own use and disposal, deducted out of the aforesaid sum in proportion. The early records of those settlements abound in evidence, that the people had an habitual and most scrupulous regard for the rights of one another. Kind, generous, and compassionate, too, they were. Far back in 1725, when the little colony was but seven years old, and the people were struggling with their first difficulties, we find the session ordering two collections in the church, one to assist James Clark to ransom his son from the Indians, which produced five pounds, and another for the relief of William Moore, whose two cows had been killed by the falling of a tree, which produced three pounds, seventeen shillings. These were great sums in those early days. We read, also, in the History of Londond
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 2: Ancestors.—parentage.—birth. (search)
prove recreant to the principles on which that Revolution was justified—on which only it can be justified. If adherence to these principles makes us the unmitigated enemy of Pius IX., we regret the enmity but cannot abjure our principles. The maiden name of Horace Greeley's mother was Woodburn, Mary Woodburn, of Londonderry. The founder of the Woodburn family in this country was John Woodburn, who emigrated from Londonderry in Ireland, to Londonderry in New Hampshire, about the year 1725, seven years after the settlement of the original sixteen families. He came over with his brother David, who was drowned a few years after, leaving a family. Neither of the brothers actually served in the siege of Londonderry; they were too young for that; but they were both men of the true Londonderry stamp, men with a good stroke in their arms, a merry twinkle in their eyes, indomitable workers, and not more brave in fight than indefatigable in frolic; fair-haired men like all their breth