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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 64 64 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 43 43 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 11 11 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 8 8 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 4 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 3 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1727 AD or search for 1727 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 36 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, James, 1656-1743 (search)
Blair, James, 1656-1743 Educator; born in Scotland in 1656; was sent to Virginia as a missionary in 1865 and in 1692 obtained the charter of William and Mary College, of which he was the first president. He published The state of his Majesty's colony in Virginia, in 1727. He died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 1, 1743.<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bowdoin, James, 1727-1790 (search)
Bowdoin, James, 1727-1790 Statesman; born in Boston, Aug. 8, 1727; was a descendant of Pierre Bowdoin, a Huguenot who fled to America from persecution in France. He graduated at Harvard in 1745, and became a member of the General Court, a Senator of Massachusetts, and a councillor. He espoused the cause of the colonists, was president of the Massachusetts Council in 1775, and was chosen president of the convention that framed the State constitution. He succeeded Hancock as governor. By vigorous measures he suppressed the rebellion led by Daniel Shays (q. v.). He died in Boston, Mass., Nov. 6, 1790. His son James, born Sept. 22, 1752; died Oct. 11, 1811; also graduated at Harvard (1771), and afterwards spent a year at Oxford. He was minister to Spain from 1805 to 1808; and while in Paris he purchased an extensive library, philosophical apparatus, and a collection of paintings, which, with a fine cabinet of minerals, he left at his death to Bowdoin College, so named in honor o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colden, Cadwallader 1688- (search)
and in 1718 made his abode in New York, where he was made first surveyor-general of the colony, became a master in chancery, and, in 1720, obtained a seat in Governor Burnet's council. He received a patent for lands in Orange county, N. Y., about 10 miles from Newburg, and there he went to reside in 1755. Becoming president of the council, he administered the government in 1760, and was made lieutenantgovernor in 1761, which station he held until his death, being repeatedly placed at the head of affairs by the absence or death of governors. During the Stamp Act excitement the populace burned his coach. After the return of Governor Tryon in 1775, he retired to his seat on Long Island. Dr. Colden wrote a History of the five Indian Nations of Canada in 1727. He was an ardent student of botany, and introduced the Linnaean system into America. He published scientific works and was a correspondent of the leading men of science in Europe. He died on Long Island, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1776.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Daggett, Naphtali, 1727- (search)
Daggett, Naphtali, 1727- Clergyman; born in Attleboro, Mass., Sept. 8, 1727; graduated at Yale College in 1748; ordained pastor of a Presbyterian church at Smithtown, Long Island, in 1751; and in 1755 was chosen professor of divinity at Yale, which place he held until his death, in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 25, 1780. In 1766, on the resignation of President Clap, he was chosen president of the college pro tempore and officiated in that capacity more than a year. He was an active patriot when the War of the Revolution broke out; and when the British attacked New Haven, in 1779, he took part in the resistance made by the citizens and surrounding militia. Dr. Daggett was made a prisoner, and the severe treatment to which he was subjected so shattered his constitution that he never recovered his health. After the famous dark day (q. v.), in 1780, he published an account of it.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Edwards, Jonathan, 1703- (search)
heologian; born in East Windsor, Conn., Oct. 5, 1703; graduated at Yale College in 1720, having begun to study Latin when he was six years of age. He is said to have reasoned out for himself his doctrine of free-will before he left college, at the age of seventeen. He began preaching to a Presbyterian congregation before he was twenty years old, and became assistant to his grandfather, Rev. Mr. Stoddard, minister at Northampton, Mass., whom he succeeded as pastor. He was dismissed in 1750, because he insisted upon a purer and higher standard of admission to the Jonathan Edwards. communion-table. Then he began his missionary work (1751) among the Stockbridge Indians, and prepared his greatest work, on The freedom, of the will, which was published in 1754. He was inaugurated president of the College of New Jersey, in Princeton, Feb. 16, 1758, and died of small-pox, March 22, 1758. He married Sarah Pierrepont, of New Haven, in 1727, and they became the grandparents of Aaron Burr.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellery, William, 1727-1820 (search)
Ellery, William, 1727-1820 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Newport, R. I., Dec. 22, 1727; graduated at Harvard in 1747; became a merchant in Newport; and was naval officer of Rhode Island in 1770. He afterwards studied and practised law at Newport, and gained a high reputation. An active patriot, he was a member of Congress from 1776 to 1785, excepting two years, and was very useful in matters pertaining to finance and diplomacy. He was especially serviceable as a member of the marine committee, and of the board of admiralty. During the occupation of Rhode Island by the British he suffered great loss of property, but bore it with quiet cheerfulness as a sacrifice for the public good. He was chief-justice of the Superior Court of Rhode Island, and in 1790 collector of the revenue at Newport. Mr. Ellery was a strenuous advocate of the abolition of slavery. He died in Newport, Feb. 15, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fleming, Thomas 1727-1776 (search)
Fleming, Thomas 1727-1776 Military officer; born in Botetourt county, Va., in 1727; took part in the great battle of Point Pleasant in 1774 between 1,000 Indians, under Cornstalk, and 400 whites, under Gen. Andrew Lewis. During the fight Colonel Fleming was severely wounded, one ball passing through his breast and another through his arm. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War he was made colonel of the 9th Virginia Regiment, but in consequence of disease and wounds, died in camp in Augu, Thomas 1727-1776 Military officer; born in Botetourt county, Va., in 1727; took part in the great battle of Point Pleasant in 1774 between 1,000 Indians, under Cornstalk, and 400 whites, under Gen. Andrew Lewis. During the fight Colonel Fleming was severely wounded, one ball passing through his breast and another through his arm. At the outbreak of the Revolutionary War he was made colonel of the 9th Virginia Regiment, but in consequence of disease and wounds, died in camp in August, 1776.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gaspe, Philip Ignatius 1714-1787 (search)
Gaspe, Philip Ignatius 1714-1787 Military officer; born in Canada, April 5, 1714; joined the army in 1727; served in a campaign Burning of the Gaspee. against the Natchez and Chicache Indians in 1739; took part in the defeat of Washington at Fort Necessity; led the Canadian militia when Fort Carillon was attacked by the English, and was largely instrumental in their defeat. He died in Canada, June 19, 1787.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 (search)
Hutchinson, Thomas 1711-1780 Royal governor; born in Boston, Sept. 9, 1711; graduated at Harvard College in 1727, and, after engaging unsuccessfully in commerce, studied law, and began its practice in Boston. That city sent him to London as its agent in important business; and he represented it in the general court for ten years. In 1752 he was chosen judge of probate; was a councillor from 1749 to 1766; was lieutenant-governor from 1758 to 1771; and was made chief-justice Thomas Hutchinson of the province in 1768. At that time he held four high offices under the King's appointment, and he naturally sided with the crown in the rising disputes, and became very obnoxious to the republicans. When, in 1769, Governor Bernard was recalled, Hutchinson became acting-governor of Massachusetts, and was commissioned governor in 1771. He was continually engaged in controversies with the popular Assembly, and often with his council. The publication of some of his letters (1773), whic
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingulf, Rudolf 1727-1785 (search)
Ingulf, Rudolf 1727-1785 Traveller; born in Cologne in 1727; emigrated to Mexico in 1751, where he became a merchant. After securing a competence he travelled through Central America, Mexico, and California. He published, in the German language, Travels in New Spain; The Geologic formation of California, in which he proved that California was a rich gold-field; Cosmography of America, etc. He died in Vienna in 1785. Ingulf, Rudolf 1727-1785 Traveller; born in Cologne in 1727; emigrated to Mexico in 1751, where he became a merchant. After securing a competence he travelled through Central America, Mexico, and California. He published, in the German language, Travels in New Spain; The Geologic formation of California, in which he proved that California was a rich gold-field; Cosmography of America, etc. He died in Vienna in 1785.
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