hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 34 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1728 AD or search for 1728 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aleutian, or Aleutan, Islands, (search)
Aleutian, or Aleutan, Islands, A group in the North Pacific Ocean, stretching in a row from the peninsula of Alaska towards the shores of Kamchatka. They belong to the Territory of Alaska. These islands were discovered by Bering in 1728, and are about 150 in number. A few of them are inhabited, chiefly by Eskimos. The population is estimated at nearly 6,000. Russian missionaries have converted them to Christianity, and they are chiefly engaged in the various fisheries. The islands are volcanic and rocky, and agriculture is unknown there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 (search)
Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 Colonial governor; was a member of Leisler's council in 1688 and was condemned with Leisler, but subsequently pardoned. In 1700 he became lieutenant-colonel of a militia regiment under Governor Bellomont. After the removal of Governor Ingoldsby. Beekman was president of the council and acting governor of New York until the arrival of Governor Hunter, in whose council he also served. He died in New York City about 1728. Beekman, Gerardus, -1728 Colonial governor; was a member of Leisler's council in 1688 and was condemned with Leisler, but subsequently pardoned. In 1700 he became lieutenant-colonel of a militia regiment under Governor Bellomont. After the removal of Governor Ingoldsby. Beekman was president of the council and acting governor of New York until the arrival of Governor Hunter, in whose council he also served. He died in New York City about 1728.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 (search)
e existence of matter, and argues that it is not without the mind, but within it, and that that which is called matter is only an impression produced by divine power on the mind by the invariable laws of nature. On a tour in France he visited the French philosopher Malebranche, who became so excited by a discussion with Berkeley on the non-existence of matter that, being ill at the time, he died a few days afterwards. Miss Vanhomrigh (Swift's Vanessa ) bequeathed to Berkeley $20,000: and in 1728 his income was increased $5,500 a year by being made Dean of Derry. Berkeley conceived a plan for establishing a college in the Bermudas for the instruction of pastors for the colonial churches and missionaries for the Indians. He resigned his offices to become rector of the projected college at a salary of $500 a year. The House of Commons authorized the appropriation of a portion of the money to be obtained from the sale of lands in St. Kitt's (St. Christopher's), which had been ceded to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Byrd, William, 1674- (search)
Byrd, William, 1674- Colonial official; born in Westover, Va., March 16, 1674. Inheriting a large fortune, and acquiring a good education, he became a leader in the promotion of science and literature in Virginia. and was made a fellow of the Royal Society of London. Long receiver-general of the revenue in Virginia, he was also three times made agent of that colony in England, and was for thirty-seven years a member, and finally president, of the King's council of the colony. He was one of the commissioners, in 1728, for running the boundary-line between Virginia and North Carolina. He made notes of his operations and the incidents thereof, which form a part of the Westover manuscripts, published by Edmund Ruffin in 1841. In 1733 he laid out the cities of Richmond and Petersburg, Va. He died Aug. 26, 1744.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 (search)
De Peyster, Abraham, 1658-1728 Jurist; born in New Amsterdam (New York), July 8, 1658; eldest son of Johannes De Peyster, a noted merchant of his day. Between 1691 and 1695 he was mayor of the city of New York; was first assistant justice and then chief-justice of New York, and was one of the King's council under Governor Hyde (afterwards Lord Cornbury), and as its president was acting-governor for a time in 1701. Judge De Peyster was colonel of the forces in New York and treasurer of that province and New Jersey. He was a personal friend and correspondent of William Penn. Having amassed considerable wealth, he built a fine mansion, which stood, until 1856, in Pearl street. It was used by Washington as his headquarters for a while in 1776. He died in New York City Aug. 10, 1728.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erskine, Sir William, 1728- (search)
Erskine, Sir William, 1728- British soldier; born in 1728; entered the English army in 1743; commanded one of the brigades at the battle of Long Island in 1776; and was second in command of Tryon's expedition to Danbury in April, 1777. In the next year he took command of the eastern district of Long Island. He died March 9, 1795. Erskine, Sir William, 1728- British soldier; born in 1728; entered the English army in 1743; commanded one of the brigades at the battle of Long Island in 1776; and was second in command of Tryon's expedition to Danbury in April, 1777. In the next year he took command of the eastern district of Long Island. He died March 9, 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fine Arts, the. (search)
mpse when he wrote: There shall be sung another Golden Age, The rise of empires and of arts, The good and great, inspiring epic rage, The wisest heads and noblest hearts. The first painter who found his way to America professionally was John Watson, a Scotchman, who was born in 1685. He began the practice of his art at Perth Amboy, then the capital of New Jersey, in 1715, where he purchased land and built houses. He died at an old age. John Smybert (q. v.) came with Dean Berkeley in 1728, and began portrait-painting in Newport, R. I. Nathan Smybert, an amiable youth, began the practice of painting, but died young in 1757. During John Smybert's time there were Blackburn in Boston and Williams of Philadelphia who painted portraits These were all Englishmen. The first American painter was Benjamin West (q. v.), who spent a greater part of his life in England, where he attained to a high reputation. John Singleton Copley (q. v.) was his contemporary, and painted portraits as e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gates, Horatio 1728-1806 (search)
Gates, Horatio 1728-1806 Military officer; born in Maldon, England, in 1728; was a godson of Horace Walpole; entered the British army in his youth, and rose rapidly to the rank of major; came to America; was severely wounded at Braddock's defeat (1755); and was aide to General Monckton in the expedition against Martinique in 1762. After the peace he bought an estate in Virginia, and when the Revolutionary War broke out Congress appointed him (June, 1775) adjutant-general of the Continental1728; was a godson of Horace Walpole; entered the British army in his youth, and rose rapidly to the rank of major; came to America; was severely wounded at Braddock's defeat (1755); and was aide to General Monckton in the expedition against Martinique in 1762. After the peace he bought an estate in Virginia, and when the Revolutionary War broke out Congress appointed him (June, 1775) adjutant-general of the Continental army, with the rank of brigadier-general. In 1776-77 he was twice in command of the Northern army, having, through intrigue, displaced General Schuyler. He gained undeserved honors as commander of the troops that defeated and captured Burgoyne and his army in the fall of 1777. He soon afterwards intrigued for the position of Washington as commander-inchief, using his power as president of the board of war for the purpose, but ignominously failed. In June, 1780, he was Horatio Gates. made
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haldimand, Sir Frederick 1728-1791 (search)
Haldimand, Sir Frederick 1728-1791 Military officer; born in Neuchatel, Switzerland, in October, 1728; served for some time in the Prussian army, and, in 1754, entered the British military service. He came to America in 1757, and as lieutenant-colonel distinguished himself at Ticonderoga (1758) and Oswego (1759). He accompanied Amherst to Montreal in 1760. In 1767 he was employed in Florida, and became major-general in 1772. Returning to England in 1775 to give the ministry information respecting the colonies, he was commissioned a major-general (Jan. 1, 1776), and in 1777 a lieutenant-general and lieutenant-governor of Quebec, where he succeeded Carleton as governor in 1778. He ruled in an arbitrary manner until 1784, when he returned to England. He died in Yverdun, Switzerland, June 5, 1791.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Insurance. (search)
Insurance. The following is a brief summary of the insurance business in the United States in its principal forms: The first fire insurance in the colonies was written in Boston by the Sun Company (English) in 1728. Some insurance was done in Philadelphia in 1752. The first fire insurance policy issued in the United States was in Hartford. Conn., in 1794, under the unofficial title of Hartford fire insurance co. Sixteen years after, in 1810, the Hartford Fire Insurance Company was organized. From 1801-10 there were 60 charters issued; 1811-20, 43; 1821-30, 149; 1831-40, 467; 1841-50, 401; 1851-60, 896; 1861-70, 1,041. From Jan. 1, 1880, to Dec. 31, 1889, property of the citizens of the United States was insured against fire and accident on ocean, lake, and river, and by tornado, to the amount of over $120,000,000,000, for premiums of $1,156,675,391, and losses were paid of $647,726,051, being 56 per cent. of the premiums. The condition and transactions of fire companies
1 2 3