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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 47 47 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 34 34 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 5 5 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct.. You can also browse the collection for 1728 AD or search for 1728 AD in all documents.

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ed, the question was put whether the prayer of the petition be granted, and it passed in the negative and was therefore dismissed. Paige states that as early as May 10, 1725, the people on the westerly side of Menotomy River desired better accommodation for public worship, and petitioned the town to consent that they might become a separate precinct. The town withheld its consent, on the ground that near one-half of said inhabitants had not signed the petition. The request was renewed in 1728. A second petition of James Cutler and others, a committee for the Northwest inhabitants of Cambridge, praying they be set off a separate and distinct precinct, by such boundaries as are set forth in their petition, was disposed of as follows: order thereon; petitioners serve town of Cambridge with copy of their petition, that they show cause, if any they have, on Wednesday, the 6th of December following, why the prayer thereof should not be granted. Ebenezer Burrill, Esq., for the co
ude, our present calamities [the British military occupation of Boston]; which we have reason to fear are but the beginning of our sorrows, the loss of our civil and religious liberties, and we left to the will of arbitrary men, to those whose tender mercies are cruelty. Mr. J. B. Russell in an article published in the Boston Transcript enumerates the following earthquakes in Massachusetts. In 1663, two; in 1665, one; in 1727, a dozen shocks in one week, one of them of great violence; in 1728, sixteen in the month of January, and over a dozen during the spring and summer months; in 1729, twenty-seven; 1729 to 1743, fifteen; 1743 to 1770, nineteen. That of November, 1755, was the most violent, being felt in Europe and America, and resulting in the destruction of Lisbon, where 60,000 persons perished. In Boston many chimneys were demolished, and other singular effects were experienced throughout New England. The publications of the time are full of the matter. Another (No. 1
of the First Church, for observing the interests of religion, a committee instituted in 1736, and renewed annually for the space of about fifty years, and was one of the members first elected. He was constable in 1725; assessor, 1721, 1724, 1727, 1728, 1736, 1741; selectman, 1728, 1736, 1741; Pct. committeeman, 1736, 1738-46; Pct. clerk, 1733-65, thirty-two years; Pct. treasurer, 1734, also Pct. assessor five years. Lydia, w. of Dea. John, d. 7 Jan. 1755, a. 64 (g. s.)—maiden name Harrington (s1728, 1736, 1741; Pct. committeeman, 1736, 1738-46; Pct. clerk, 1733-65, thirty-two years; Pct. treasurer, 1734, also Pct. assessor five years. Lydia, w. of Dea. John, d. 7 Jan. 1755, a. 64 (g. s.)—maiden name Harrington (see Bond's Wat. 273). Deacon John d. 21 Jan. 1776, in 86th yr. and 37th of his office—his surviving children 8, grandchildren 68, great-grandchildren 115, and of the fifth generation 3 (g. s.). Had Lydia, adm. to Camb. ch. 5 May, 1728, m. Seth Reed (pub. 5 Aug. 1732); Rebecca, who m. first, Zechariah Hill, and second, Samuel Carter—at the time of her death the mother of 11 children, grandmother of 103, great-grandmother of 150, and of the fourth generation 134; Honnah, m. John Brooks; Mary, m.