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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 69 69 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 53 53 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 15 15 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 9 9 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 9 9 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 6 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 6 6 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1732 AD or search for 1732 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
Gorsuch. David Jones, the first settler on the A view of Baltimore to-day. site of Baltimore, in 1682, gave his name to a small stream that runs through the city. In January, 1730, a town was laid out on the west of this stream, contained in a plot of 60 acres, and was called Baltimore, in honor of Cecil, Lord Baltimore. In the same year William Fell, a ship-carpenter, purchased a tract east of the stream and called it Fell's Point, on the extremity of which Fort McHenry now stands. In 1732 a new town of 10 acres was laid out on the east side of the stream, and called Jonestown. It was united to Baltimore in 1745, dropping its own name. In 1767 Baltimore became the county town. The population in 1890 was 434,439; in 1900, 508,957. When the British army approached the Delaware River (December, 1776), and it was feared that they would cross into Pennsylvania and march on Philadelphia, there was much anxiety among the patriots. The Continental Congress, of the courage and pa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beaumarchais, Pierre Augutstin caron de, 1732- (search)
Beaumarchais, Pierre Augutstin caron de, 1732- Author; born in Paris, Jan. 24, 1732; the son of a watch-maker. In 1761 he purchased a commission as secretary to the King, a sinecure which conferred noble rank on its possessor, and the name of Beaumarchais, which he had assumed, was legally confirmed. Entering into mercantile speculations, he soon acquired a large fortune. He was the author of the famous play, the Barber of Seville. In September 1775, he submitted a memorial to the French monarch, in which he insisted upon the necessity of the French government's secretly aiding the English-American colonies; and as agent of his government he passed some time in England, where he became acquainted with Arthur Lee, which acquaintance led to diplomatic and commercial relations with the Continental Congress. He conducted the business of supplying the Americans with munitions of war with great ability, and afterwards became involved in a lawsuit with them. In 1784 he produced his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bering (now preferred to the form Behring), Vitus, (search)
Bering (now preferred to the form Behring), Vitus, Danish navigator; born at Horsen, in Jutland, in 1680. In his youth he made several voyages to the East and West Indies; entered the Russian navy, and served with distinction against the Swedes; and in 1725 commanded a scientific expedition to the Sea of Kamtchatka. He ascertained that Asia and America were separated by water — a strait which now bears his name. This problem Peter the Great had been very desirous of having solved. Bering was appointed captain commandant in 1732, and in 1741 set out on a second voyage to the same region, when he discovered a part of the North American continent supposed to have been New Norfolk. he and his crew, being disabled by sickness, attempted to return to Kamtchatka, but were wrecked on an island that now bears his name, where Bering died Dec. 8, 1741. His discoveries were the foundation of the claim of Russia to a large region in the far northwest of the American continent. See Alask
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, John, 1732-1800 (search)
Blair, John, 1732-1800 Jurist; born in Williamsburg, Va., in 1732; was educated at the College of William and Mary; studied law at the Temple, London; soon rose to the first rank as a lawyer; was a member of the House of Burgesses as early as 1765, and was one of the dissolved Virginia Assembly who met at the Raleigh Tavern, in the summer of 1774, and drafted the Virginia non-importation agreement. He was one of the committee who, in June, 1776, drew up the plan for the Virginia State gove1732; was educated at the College of William and Mary; studied law at the Temple, London; soon rose to the first rank as a lawyer; was a member of the House of Burgesses as early as 1765, and was one of the dissolved Virginia Assembly who met at the Raleigh Tavern, in the summer of 1774, and drafted the Virginia non-importation agreement. He was one of the committee who, in June, 1776, drew up the plan for the Virginia State government, and in 1777 was elected a judge of the Court of Appeals; then chief-justice, and, in 1780, a judge of the High Court of Chancery. he was one of the framers of the national Constitution; and, in 1789. Washington appointed him a judge of the United States Supreme Court. He resigned his seat on the bench of that court in 1796, and died in Williamsburg, Va., Aug. 31, 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carver, Jonathan 1732-1780 (search)
Carver, Jonathan 1732-1780 Traveller; born in Stillwater, Conn., in 1732; served in the French and Indian War, and afterwards attempted to explore the vast region in America which the English had acquired from the French. He penetrated the country to Lake Superior and its shores and tributaries, and, after travelling about 7.000 miles, he returned to Boston, whence he departed in 1766, and sailed for England, to communicate his discoveries to the government, and to petition the King for a 1732; served in the French and Indian War, and afterwards attempted to explore the vast region in America which the English had acquired from the French. He penetrated the country to Lake Superior and its shores and tributaries, and, after travelling about 7.000 miles, he returned to Boston, whence he departed in 1766, and sailed for England, to communicate his discoveries to the government, and to petition the King for a reimbursement of his expenses. His Travels were published in 1778. He was badly used in England, and, by utter neglect, was reduced to a state of extreme destitution. He died in London, Jan. 31, 1780.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, George 1739- (search)
Clinton, George 1739- Naval officer and colonial governor; youngest son of Francis, sixth Earl of Lincoln, and rose to distinction in the British navy. In 1732 he was commissioned a commodore and governor of Newfoundland. In September, 1743, he was appointed governor of the colony of New York, and retained that office ten years. His administration was a tumultuous one, for his temperament and want of skill in the management of civil affairs unfitted him for the duties. He was unlettered; and being closely connected with the Dukes of Newcastle and Bedford, he was sent to New York to mend his fortune. In his controversies with the Assembly he was ably assisted by the pen of Dr. Cadwallader Colden, afterwards lieutenant-governor of the province. His chief opponent was Daniel Horsmanden, at one time chief-justice of the colony. After violent quarrels with all the political factions in New York, he abandoned the government in disgust, and returned home in 1753. He became gover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
in honor of Charles II., of England. In 1668 the foundations of the commonwealth of State of North Carolina (q. v.) were laid at Edenton. In 1670 some people from Barbadoes sailed into the harbor of Charleston and settled on the Ashley and Cooper rivers (see State of South Carolina). The benevolent General Oglethorpe, commiserating the condition of the prisoners for debt, in England, conceived the idea of founding a colony in America with them. The government approved the project, and, in 1732, he landed, with emigrants, on the site of the city of Savannah, and there planted the germ of the commonwealth of Georgia (q. v.) The first English colony planted in America was the one sent over in 1585 by Sir Walter Raleigh, who despatched Sir Richard Grenville, with seven ships and many people, to form a colony in Virginia, with Ralph Lane as their governor. At Roanoke Island Grenville left 107 men under Lane to plant a colony, the first ever founded by Englishmen in America. This co
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornplanter, or Garyan-Wah-Gah (search)
Cornplanter, or Garyan-Wah-Gah A Seneca Indian chief; born in Conewaugus, on the Genesee River, N. Y., in 1732; was a half-breed, the son of an Indian trader named John O'Bail. He led Indian allies with the French against the English; was in the sharp battle of Monongahela in 1755; and, joining the British in the war of the Revolution, led destroyers of the settlements in New York and northern Pennsylvania. An inveterate foe of the Americans during the war, he was their firm friend afterwards. He was an earnest promoter of temperance among his people. He died at the Seneca reservation, Pennsylvania, Feb. 17, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crawford, William 1732- (search)
Crawford, William 1732- Military officer; born in Berkeley county, Va., in 1732; was early engaged in surveying with Washington, and served with him in Braddock's expedition against Fort Duquesne. He also served during the Pontiac Indian war, and after the opening of the Revolutionary War he became colonel of the 5th Virginia Regiment. Throughout the war he was intimately associated with Washington. In May, 1782, although he had resigned from the army, he accepted at the request of Washi1732; was early engaged in surveying with Washington, and served with him in Braddock's expedition against Fort Duquesne. He also served during the Pontiac Indian war, and after the opening of the Revolutionary War he became colonel of the 5th Virginia Regiment. Throughout the war he was intimately associated with Washington. In May, 1782, although he had resigned from the army, he accepted at the request of Washington the command of the expedition against the Wyandotte and Delaware Indians on the banks of the Muskingum River. His force became surrounded by Indians, and after it had cut its way out his men became separated. Colonel Crawford was captured and, after being horribly tortured, was burned to death by the Indians, June 11, 1782.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Credit Mobilier, (search)
nce with the tribe of the Coosas. When the Carolinas and Louisiana began to be settled by the English, Spaniards, and French, they all courted the Creek nation. The English won the Lower Creeks, the French the Upper Creeks, while the Spaniards, through their presents, gained an influence over a portion of them. In 1710 some of these (the Cowetas) made war on the Carolinas, and were petted by the Spaniards at St. Augustine, but in 1718 they joined the French, who built a fort at Mobile. In 1732 eight Creek tribes made a treaty with Oglethorpe at Savannah; and in 1739 he made a treaty with the Cowetas, and they joined him in his expedition against St. Augustine. When the French power in North America was overthrown, the entire Creek nation became subject to English influence. At that time they had fifty towns, and numbered nearly 6,000 warriors. They were the allies of the British during the American Revolution. Many Tories fled to the Creek towns from the Carolinas and Georgi
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