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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 57 57 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 38 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 7 7 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 3 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1733 AD or search for 1733 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 34 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beissel, Johann Conrad, 1690- (search)
Beissel, Johann Conrad, 1690- Reformer; born in Eberbach, Germany, in 1690; becoming a Dunker he was forced to leave his native country and emigrated to Pennsylvania, where in 1733 he established at the village of Ephrata a monastic society, which at one time numbered nearly 300. The Capuchin habit was adopted )by both sexes and celibacy was considered a virtue, though not an obligation. Soon after the death of Beissel, in 1768, the society at Ephrata began to decline. A history of the Ephrata society was published in 1901.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bienville, Jean Baptiste le moyne, 1680-1701 (search)
om( France, bienville retained the office. Having tried unsuccessfully to cultivate the land by Indian labor, Bienville proposed to the government to exchange Indians for negroes in the West Indies, at the rate of three Indians for one negro. Bienville remained at the head of the colony until 1713, when Cadillac arrived, as governor, with a commission for the former as lieutenant-governor. Quarrels between them ensued. Cadillac was superseded in 1717 by Epinay, and Bienville received the decoration of the Cross of St. Louis. In 1718 he founded the city of New Orleans; and war breaking out between France and Spain, he seized Pensacola and put his brother Chateaugay in command there. He was summoned to France in 1724 to answer charges, where he remained until 1733, when he was sent back to Louisiana as governor, with the rank of lieutenant-general. Having made unsuccessful expeditions against the Chickasaws, he was superseded in 1743, and returned to France, where he died in 1765.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Byrd, William, 1674- (search)
Byrd, William, 1674- Colonial official; born in Westover, Va., March 16, 1674. Inheriting a large fortune, and acquiring a good education, he became a leader in the promotion of science and literature in Virginia. and was made a fellow of the Royal Society of London. Long receiver-general of the revenue in Virginia, he was also three times made agent of that colony in England, and was for thirty-seven years a member, and finally president, of the King's council of the colony. He was one of the commissioners, in 1728, for running the boundary-line between Virginia and North Carolina. He made notes of his operations and the incidents thereof, which form a part of the Westover manuscripts, published by Edmund Ruffin in 1841. In 1733 he laid out the cities of Richmond and Petersburg, Va. He died Aug. 26, 1744.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Conway, Thomas 1733- (search)
Conway, Thomas 1733- Military officer; born in Ireland, Feb. 27, 1733; taken to France when he was six years old, was educated there, attained the military rank of colonel, came to America in 1777, and entered the Continental army as brigadier-general. He was engaged in the conspiracy with Gates and others to supplant Washington as commander-in-chief, and, when discovered, he left the service and returned to France. In 1784 Conway was made a field-marshal, and appointed governor of all the French settlements in the East Indies. When the French Revolution broke out he was compelled to flee from France. He died about 1800.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Lancey, James, 1703-1760 (search)
De Lancey, James, 1703-1760 Jurist; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1703; eldest son of Etienne De Lancey; graduated at the University of Cambridge, England, and soon after his return to New York (1729) was made a justice of the Supreme Court of that province, and chiefjustice in 1733. For two years, as lieutenant-governor, he was acting governor (1753-55), after the death of Governor Osborn. Judge De Lancey was for many years the most influential man in the politics and legislation of the colony, and was one of the founders of King's College (now Columbia University). He wrote a Review of the military operations from 1753 to 1756. He died in New York City, July 30, 1760.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drama, early American. (search)
Drama, early American. As early as 1733, there appears to have been a sort of theatrical performance in the city of New York. In October of that year, George Talbot, a merchant, published a notice in Bradford's Gazette, directing inquiries to be made at his store next door to the Play-house. In 1750 some young Englishmen and Americans got up a coffee-house representation of Otway's Orphans in Boston. The pressure for entrance to the novelty was so great that a disturbance arose, which gave the authorities reason for taking measures for the suppression of such performances. At the next session of the legislature a law was made prohibiting theatrical entertainments, because, as it was expressed in the preamble, they tended not only to discourage industry and frugality, but likewise greatly to increase immorality, impiety, and a contempt for religion. Regular theatrical performances were introduced into America soon afterwards, when, in 1752, a company of actors from London, le
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duane, James, 1733-1797 (search)
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fellows, John 1733-1808 (search)
Fellows, John 1733-1808 Military officer; born in Pomfret, Conn., in 1733; was in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775; led a company of minute-men to Cambridge after the skirmish at Lexington, and was made brigadiergeneral of militia in June, 1776. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, and Bemis's Heights, and was very active in the capture of Burgoyne, October, 1777. After the war he was high sherin., in 1733; was in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775; led a company of minute-men to Cambridge after the skirmish at Lexington, and was made brigadiergeneral of militia in June, 1776. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Long Island, White Plains, and Bemis's Heights, and was very active in the capture of Burgoyne, October, 1777. After the war he was high sheriff of Berkshire county. He died in Sheffield, Mass., Aug. 1, 1808.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
The Landing of Oglethorpe in Georgia. The Capitol, Atlanta, Georgia. emigrants, and, after a passage of fifty days, touched at Charleston, giving great joy to the inhabitants, for he was about to erect a barrier between them and the Indians and Spaniards. Landing a large portion of the emigrants on Port Royal Island, he proceeded to the Savannah River with the remainder, and upon Yamacraw Bluff (the site of Savannah) he laid the foundations of the future State in the ensuing spring of 1733. The rest of the emigrants soon joined him. They built a fort, and called the place Savannah, the Indian name of the river, and there he held a friendly conference with the Indians, with whom satisfactory arrangements for obtaining sovereignty of the domain were made. Within eight years 2,500 emigrants were sent over from England at an expense to the trustees of $400,000. The condition upon which the lands were parcelled out was military duty; and so grievous were the restrictions, that
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazen, Moses 1733-1803 (search)
Hazen, Moses 1733-1803 Military officer; born in Haverhill, Mass., in 1733; served in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was in the attack on Louisburg in 1758; and with Wolfe at Quebec in 1759, where he distinguished himself. He fought bravely at Sillery in 1760, and was made a lieutenant. A half-pay British officer, he was residing near St. John, Canada, when the American Revolution broke out. He furnished supplies to Montgomery's troops, and afterwards became an efficient officer in th1733; served in the French and Indian War (q. v.); was in the attack on Louisburg in 1758; and with Wolfe at Quebec in 1759, where he distinguished himself. He fought bravely at Sillery in 1760, and was made a lieutenant. A half-pay British officer, he was residing near St. John, Canada, when the American Revolution broke out. He furnished supplies to Montgomery's troops, and afterwards became an efficient officer in the Continental army. His property was destroyed by the British. In June, 1781, he was made a brigadier-general. He and his two brothers emigrated to Vermont after the war. He died in Troy, N. Y., Feb. 3, 1803.
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