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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 57 57 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 38 38 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 22 22 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 12 12 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 7 7 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. 3 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register. You can also browse the collection for 1733 AD or search for 1733 AD in all documents.

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n of a fire-engine in Cambridge is dated March 3, 1755, when, upon the motion of Capt. Ebenezer Stedman and others, referring to the town's agreeing with Henry Vassall Esq., who has an Engine and is willing the same should be improved for the town's use on certain conditions, the question was put whether the town would act on said motion, and it passed in the negative. In all probability, however, the town then possessed one or more engines. Boston had one before 1679, and seven as early as 1733; Drake's Hist. Boston, 431, 593. and Cambridge would not be likely to remain entirely destitute. Yet the machines then in use might seem almost worthless, compared with the powerful steam-engines recently introduced. The Town Record of Births and Deaths in the last three quarters of the eighteenth century is very imperfect; all the deaths recorded between 1722 and 1772 are contained on two folio pages. Professor Winthrop inserted brief bills of mortality, for a few years, in his inte
uel Smith, 1716-1735. James Cutler, 1718-1735. Thomas Thompson, 1721-1724. Elizabeth Thompson, 1725. Thomas Brown, 1721. William Bond, 1722-1724. Peter Oliver, 1727-1729. Joshua Gamage, 1729-1731. Daniel Champney, Jr., 1730-1733. Thomas Holt, 1730-1731. Thomas Dana, 1731-1735. William Bowen, 1732. Jonathan Starr, 1735. During the early part of the present century, the Davenport Tavern, at the westerly corner of North Avenue and Beech Street, was widely cele1704-1717. Martha Remington, 1705-1712. Jonathan Remington, 1713-1735. Nathaniel Hancock, Jr., 1707-1709. Mary Bordman, 1708-1714. John Stedman, 1717-1724. Sarah Fessenden, 1720-1735. Mary Oliver, 1731-1732. Edward Marrett, 1733-1735. Two of these retailers in their old age found it necessary to appeal to the County Court for relief; their petitions are still preserved on file, to wit:— To the honored Court assembled at Cambridge, all prosperity wished. Thease
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
al. Cottage Street Methodist. St. Paul's. Church of the Sacred heart. Ascension Church. Charles River Baptist Christ Church.—A comprehensive and interesting Historical Notice of Christ Church, is appended to a sermon by Rev. Nicholas Hoppin, D. D., on the reopening of the church, Nov. 22, 1857. This church was originally established as a missionary station by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, under the charge of Rev. East Apthorp, who was born in Boston, 1733, and educated at Cambridge, England. The original subscription for building the church is dated at Boston, April 25, 1759. The petition to the society was signed by Henry Vassal, Joseph Lee, John Vassal, Ralph Inman, Thomas Oliver, David Phips, Robert Temple, James Apthorp. At a meeting held at Boston, September 29, 1759, the six first named gentlemen, with the Rev. East Apthorp, were chosen as the building committee; Ralph Inman, Esq., was appointed Treasurer. Hist. Notice, etc., p. 21.
20. Spencer Phips, 1721. William Brattle, 1729-1733, 1735, 1736, 1754, 1755, 1770. Samuel Danforth, 1s Bordmnan, 1713-1718, 1720– 1724, 1726, 1727, 1731, 1733-1736. Joseph Coolidge, 1713, 1714, 1730. Danier, 1728, 1736, 1741. William Brattle, 1729, 1731-1733, 1748-1757, 1766-1772. Joseph Adams, 1729, 1731, Isaac Watson, 1731, 1737, 1738. Samuel Danforth, 1733, 1734, 1737– 1739. Henry Dunster, 1733, 1734. 1733, 1734. Samuel Smith, 1733. Benjamin Dana, Jr., 1734-1736, 1742, 1743. Samuel Sparhawk, 1737-1741. John Vassa1733. Benjamin Dana, Jr., 1734-1736, 1742, 1743. Samuel Sparhawk, 1737-1741. John Vassall, 1739, 1740, 1747. Jonathan Butterfield, Jr., 1739, 1740. Andrew Bordman [2d], 1740-1769. Joseph B Joseph Bowman, 1712. Moses Bordman, 1714, 1717, 1733– 1736. William Cutter, 1716. Jonathan Remingtorown, 1730. Isaac Watson, 1731. Henry Dunster, 1733, 1734. Samuel Smith, 1733. Benjamin Dana, 17341733. Benjamin Dana, 1734-1736, 1742. Samuel Sparhawk [2d], 1737-1741. Jonathan Butterfield, 1739, 1740. John Winship, 1742. <
estate on the east side of Dunster Street from 1733 to 1737, when he sold it, with a new house, to ve from that town eight years, between 1715 and 1733, and was also Justice of the Peace, when that o-2, a. 19. He then m. Thankful Pickens of Lynn 1733, and had Richard, a second Richard, Israel, Sarnna, ap. 2 Ap. 1732. John the the f. d. 15 Ap. 1733 (as appears by receipts on the Probate Files), bap. 5 Ap. 1730, d. young; Daniel, bap. 29 Ap. 1733; Susanna, bap. 30 Nov. 1735; Rebecca, bap. 5 Fed responsibility. he was Selectman five years, 1733-1739, Representative four years, 1734-1738, Memf. succeeded his father in the office of Deacon 1733, and d. 19 Aug. 1740, a. nearly 50. Estw Ck,f Probate 1731, and Judge of the Superior Court 1733, which last two offices he held during life. H698; Sarah, b. 10 Ap. 1700, m.——Hyde, d. before 1733; Nathaniel, b. 7 May 1702, m. Abigail Park of N0; Lydia, bap. 28 May 1732; Andrew, bap. 29 Ap. 1733. Andrew, the f. res. at Menot., and d. 20 Jun[12 more...]<
7 Sept. 1746; James, 18 Dec. 1748; Daniel, 8 Sept. 1751. Daniel the f. was a carpenter, owned the northerly part of estate on the east side of Dunster Street from 1733 to 1737, when he sold it, with a new house, to Andrew Bordmnan, Jr. He was College Sweeper in 1753, and d. before 1764, when his w. held the same office, and retai was Constable 1689, and Selectman 1696 and from 1700 to 1711. After the incorporation of Lex., he was Representative from that town eight years, between 1715 and 1733, and was also Justice of the Peace, when that office was bestowed much more sparingly than now. His children, according to Hudson (Hist. Lex.), were Francis, b. a from 1755 to 1773, except the single year 1769, when he was negatived by the Governor. As early as 1729, he was Major; Capt. of the Ancient and Hon. Artillery in 1733; Adjutant-general as early as 1758; and Brigadier-general. Up to 1769, Gen. Brattle seems to have advocated the popular rights, and was probably negatived by the
lowers, whom he m. 1 Oct. 1730; she had one son Thomas, and d. 13 Jan. 1731-2, a. 19. He then m. Thankful Pickens of Lynn 1733, and had Richard, a second Richard, Israel, Sarah, Elizabeth, and Thomas. His wid. Thankful d. 31 July 1777, a. 71. (Stoncapable of managing his affairs; William, bap. 11 Jan. 1729-30, d. young; Anna, ap. 2 Ap. 1732. John the the f. d. 15 Ap. 1733 (as appears by receipts on the Probate Files), and his w. Hannah prob. m. Benjamin Crackbone, pub. 30 Sept. 1738. 9. WBap. 8 Feb. 1729-30, m. Walter Dickson 3 May 1750; Rebecca, bap. 12 Mar. 1731-2, m. Jason Dunster 26 Oct. 1749; Hannah, b. 1733; John, i. 1735. 1 Samuel the f. resided in Chs. after 1724, and d. 29 Sept. 1737, a. 37; on the division of his estate, 17nezer, bap. 15 May 1726; Mary, bap. 25 Mar. 1728, m. Timothy Hall; Susanna, bap. 5 Ap. 1730, d. young; Daniel, bap. 29 Ap. 1733; Susanna, bap. 30 Nov. 1735; Rebecca, bap. 5 Feb. 1737-8, pub. Thomas Hall, Jr., 17 Sept. 1756; Abigail. Ebenezer the f. r
dent of the Mass. Medical Society, and d. 16 Nov. 1827; Thomas, b. 21 Aug. 1744, grad. H. C. 1762, was a lawyer in Chs. until the Revolution, when he tied to England, and d. at London 6 Mar. 1820; John, b. 17 Sept. 1748. Samuel the f. d. at the house of his son in Boston, 27 Oct. 1777, a. about 81; his w. Elizabeth d. 13 Jan. 1775, a. 67; but both were buried here. Judge Danforth, during a large portion of his life, filled offices of trust and responsibility. he was Selectman five years, 1733-1739, Representative four years, 1734-1738, Member of the Council thirty-six years in succession, 1739-1774, in which last named year he was appointed Mandamus Councillor, but having taken the oath of office, he was speedily induced to resign. He was also Justice of the Peace and Quorum; Register of Probate, 1731-1745; Judge of Probate, 1745– 1775; Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 1741-1775. At the Revolution he passed out of office; but was so quiet in his deportment that, although unde
he had Benjamin, b. 13 Dec. 1695, and Richard, b. 5 July 1697. 4. Joseph, s. of Joseph (2), m. Submit, dau. of Joseph Loring, 8 July 1713; she d. 31 Mar. 1718, and he m. Hannah Bowman 26 Mar. 1719. His children were Joseph, b. 27 June, and d. 17 July 1714; Joseph, b. 16 and d. 18 Mar. 1717-18; Joseph, b. 9 Ap. 1720; Hannah, b. 22 Sept. 1725, d. young; Benjamin, b. 9 Oct. 1727, d. 29 Dec. 1728; Hannah, b. 24 Oct. 1728; Benjamin, b. 20 Dec. 1729 (whose son Joseph, b. 4 Mar. 1758, grad. H. C. 1782, was ordained at Athol 21 Nov. 1787, and d. 1830); a daughter, b. 6 Oct. 1731; Solomon, b. 10 June, and d. 1 Oct. 1733; Samuel, b. 16 June 1735; Millicent, b. 25 July 1738; Ebenezer, posthumous, b. 21 Sept. 1740. Joseph the f. succeeded his father in the office of Deacon 1733, and d. 19 Aug. 1740, a. nearly 50. Estw Ck, Pheasant, by w. Sarah, had Stephen, b. 3 Oct. 1679. Everett, Francis, m. Mary Edwards 7 Dec. 1675. The name does not occur again on our Records, for about a century.
1 Ap. 1709 to his brother John. In 1729 he bought a house at the northwest corner of Holyoke and Mount Auburn streets, where he d. between 28 June and 18 Nov. 1735; his w. Mary m. Nathaniel Parker of Newton 27 Jan. 1636-7. 4. John, s. of Joseph (2), by w. Abiel, had in Chs., John, b. 12 June 1707; Sarah, b. 28 Feb. 1708-9; and in Camb., Thomas, b. 2 Sept. 1710, a physician, d. in the English Factory, River Gambia, Africa, 1732; James, b. 1 Dec. 1712, a carpenter, removed to Plymouth about 1733, is said to have been a preacher from 1742 to 1767, and afterwards clerk in a mercantile house; he m. Lydia, dau. of John Atwood of Plymouth; she d. 23 Feb. 1771, a. 56, and he d. 7 Jan. 1781; Ebenezer, b. 12 July 1714. John the f. was a baker, but he bought of his brother Joseph, 1 Ap. 1709, the Blue Anchor Tavern, which he probably kept as a public house until he d. 13 Sept. 1714; his w. Abiel m. Edmund Angier 9 Ap. 1717, who d. 4 Ap. 1724; she then m. Isaac Watson 27 Aug. 1725; he perish
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