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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 85 85 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 53 53 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1737 AD or search for 1737 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 53 results in 43 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, James, 1690-1756 (search)
of New York, to which he emigrated from Scotland in 1715, where he was born in 1690. He had fled from Scotland because of his peril there as an adherent of the Young Pretender. He was accompanied by William Smith, afterwards chief-justice of the province and its historian. He was made surveyor-general of New Jersey and New York. was secretary of the latter colony, and attained eminence in the profession of the law. As attorney-general of the province and occupant of other important positions, he became distinguished. He was one of the able counsel who defended the freedom of the press in the person of John Peter Zenger in 1735. Because of the part which he took in that famous trial he was arbitrarily excluded from the bar, but was reinstated in 1737. He was associated with Franklin and others in founding the American Philosophical Society. He was the father of William Alexander, known as Lord Stirling, a general in the Continental army. He died in New York City, April 2. 1756.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
Allen, Ethan, 1737- military officer; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 10, 1737. In 1762 he was one of the proprietors of the ironworks at Salisbury, Conn. In 1766) he went to the then almost unsettled domain between the Green Mountains and Lake Champlain, where he was a bold leader of the settlers on the New Hampshire grants in their controversy with the authorities of New York. (See New Hampshire.) During this period several pamphlets were written by Allen, in his peculiar style, which forcibly illustrated the injustice of the action of the New York authorities. The latter declared Allen an outlaw. and offered a reward of £ 150 for his arrest. He defied his enemies, and persisted in his course. Early in May, 1775, he led a few men and took the fortress of Ticonderoga. His followers were called Green Mountain boys. His success as a partisan caused him to be sent twice into Canada, during the latter half of 1775, to win the people over to the republican cause. In the las
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boehler, Peter, 1712-1775 (search)
Boehler, Peter, 1712-1775 Clergyman: born in Frankfort, Germany, Dec. 31, 1712: was graduated at Jena in 1736; ordained a Moravian minister in 1737; and was sent as an evangelist to Carolina and Georgia in 1738. On his way he became acquainted with John and Charles Wesley, upon whom he exercised great influence. Indeed. John Wesley records in his diary that Boehler was the person through whom he was brought to believe in Christ. The Moravian colony in Georgia was broken up and removed to Pennsylvania in 1740. He was consecrated bishop in 1748 and superintended the Moravian churches in America in 1 753-64, when he was recalled to Germany. He died in London, England, April 27, 1775.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brickett, James, 1737-1818 (search)
Brickett, James, 1737-1818 Military officer: born in 1737; was a physician in Haverhill, Mass., until the beginning of the French and Indian War; was a surgeon in the army at Ticonderoga; was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill; appointed brigadier-general in the expedition designed for Canada in 1776; and commanded the American escort of Burgoyne's surrendered army from the Saratoga battle-field to Cambridge, Mass., in 1777. He died in Haverhill. Mass., Dec. 9, 1818. Brickett, James, 1737-1818 Military officer: born in 1737; was a physician in Haverhill, Mass., until the beginning of the French and Indian War; was a surgeon in the army at Ticonderoga; was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill; appointed brigadier-general in the expedition designed for Canada in 1776; and commanded the American escort of Burgoyne's surrendered army from the Saratoga battle-field to Cambridge, Mass., in 1777. He died in Haverhill. Mass., Dec. 9, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
Burr, Aaron, 1716- educator; born in Fairfield, Conn., Jan. 4, 1716; was of German descent; graduated at Yale College in 1735; and ordained by the presbytery of east Jersey in 1737. He became pastor at Newark. N. J., where he was chiefly instrumental in founding the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and was elected its president in 1748. In 1752 he married a daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the metaphysician. In 1754 he accompanied Whitefield to Boston. He died Sept. 24, 1757. Vice-President of the United States; born at Newark. N. .J., Feb. 6, 1756; a son of Rev. Aaron Burr, President of the College of New Jersey, and of a daughter of the eminent theologian, Jonathan Edwards. When nineteen years of age, he entered the Continental army, at Cambridge, as a private soldier, and as such accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. From the line of that expedition, in the wilderness. Arnold sent him with despatches to General Montgomery, at Montreal, wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carroll, Charles, of Carrollton 1737-1832 (search)
Carroll, Charles, of Carrollton 1737-1832 signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Annapolis, Md., Sept. 20, 1737. His family were wealthy Roman Catholics, Charles Carroll. the first appearing in America at the close of the seventeenth century. He was educated at St. Omer's and at a Jesuit college at Rheims; and studied law in France and at the Temple, London. He returned to America in 1764, when he found the colonies agitated by momentous political questions, into which he soon entered— a writer on the side of the liberties of the people. He inherited a vast estate, and was considered one of the richest men in the colonies. Mr. Carroll was a member of one of the first vigilance committees established at Annapolis, and a member of the Provincial Convention. Early in 1776 he was one of a committee appointed by Congress to visit Canada to persuade the Canadians to join the other colonies in resistance to the measures of Parliament. His colleagues were Dr. Frank
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Copley, John Singleton 1737-1813 (search)
Copley, John Singleton 1737-1813 Artist; born in Boston, Mass., July 3, 1737; in 1774 he went to Rome, and in 1775 to London. He became so famous as an historical painter that he was admitted to the Royal Academy in 1783. His Death of the Earl of Chatham gave him great fame in England. It was followed by others which increased his reputation; and he left unfinished a picture on the subject of Nelson's death at Trafalgar. His wife was daughter of Richard Clarke, a loyalist of Boston, and one of the consignees of the tea that was destroyed there. He died in London, Sept. 9, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dayton, Elias, 1737-1807 (search)
Dayton, Elias, 1737-1807 Military officer; born in Elizabethtown, N. J., in July, 1737; fought with the Jersey Blues under Wolfe at Quebec; was member of the committee of safety at the beginning of the Revolution, and became colonel of the 3d New Jersey Regiment. He served in New York and New Jersey; fought in several battles, the last at Yorktown, and in January, 1783, was made a brigadier-general. He was a member of Congress in 1787-88, and was afterwards in the New Jersey legislature. He died in Elizabethtown, July 17, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Deane, Silas, 1737-1789 (search)
Deane, Silas, 1737-1789 Diplomatist; born in Groton, Conn., Dec. 24, 1737; graduated at Yale College in 1758; became a merchant in Wethersfield, Conn.; and was a delegate to the first Continental Silas Deane. Congress. He was very active in Congress, in 1775, in fitting out a naval force for the colonies, and in the spring of 1776 was sent to France as a secret political and financial agent, with authority to operate in Holland and elsewhere. He was to ascertain the feeling of the French government towards the revolted colonies and Great Britain, and to obtain military supplies. Mr. Deane went in the character of a Bermuda merchant; and, the better to cover his designs, he did not take any considerable sum of money or bills of exchange with him for his support. The secret committee was to send them after him by way of London, to arrive in Paris nearly as soon as himself, lest a capture should betray his secret. On his arrival in Paris he sought an interview with the Count d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duche, Jacob, 1737- (search)
Duche, Jacob, 1737- Clergyman; born in Philadelphia, in 1737; educated at the University of Pennsylvania; and became an eloquent Episcopalian. A descendant of a Huguenot, he naturally loved freedom. Assistant minister of Christ Church, Philadelphia, he was invited by the Continental Congress of 1774 to open their proceedings with prayer, and received their public thanks. In 1775 he became rector of Christ Church, and espoused the patriot cause. Of a timid nature, Duche, when the British1737; educated at the University of Pennsylvania; and became an eloquent Episcopalian. A descendant of a Huguenot, he naturally loved freedom. Assistant minister of Christ Church, Philadelphia, he was invited by the Continental Congress of 1774 to open their proceedings with prayer, and received their public thanks. In 1775 he became rector of Christ Church, and espoused the patriot cause. Of a timid nature, Duche, when the British took possession of Philadelphia (1777), alarmed by the gloomy outlook, forsook the Americans, and, in a letter to Washington, urged him to do likewise. This letter was transmitted to Congress, and Duche fled to England, where he became a popular preacher. His estate was confiscated, and he was banished as a traitor. In 1790 Duche returned to Philadelphia, where he died Jan. 3, 1798. First prayer in Congress. The following is the of Dr. Ducheas first prayer in Congress: O Lord, o
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