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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 85 85 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 53 53 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 20 20 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 9 9 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians. You can also browse the collection for 1737 AD or search for 1737 AD in all documents.

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the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Nathniel Lardner (search)
ivines both at home and abroad. His correspondence was very extensive, and by no means confined to persons of his own religious connexion or opinions. Most of the learned foreigners who came to England visited Dr. Lardner, and often appear to have derived, valuable assistance from him in the prosecution of their literary designs and pursuits. While our author was engaged on the Credibility, he appeared occasionally from the press with other minor but still very valuable productions. In 1737, he published, Counsels of Prudence for the use of young People; a Discourse on the wisdom of the serpent, and the innocence of the dove; in which are recommended general rules of prudence, with particular directions relating to business, conversation, friendship, and general usefulness. This excellent and judicious piece has been much and deservedly admired, as containing a store of sound and valuable advice, well adapted to the young persons for whom it was intended, and proceeding from a
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, John Taylor, (search)
publication was a prefatory discourse to a statement of the case of Mr. Joseph Rawson. This gentleman was excluded from communion with a congregational church at Nottingham, for refusing, after suspicions were entertained of his heterodoxy, to answer in other than scriptural language the following question put to him by the minister, Whether Jesus Christ is the one true supreme God, the same with the Father in Nature, and equal with him in all divine perfections. The publication appeared in 1737, without our author's name; and contains the most just and manly sentiments on the Common Rights of Christians. It gives a brief sketch of the rise and progress of those corruptions which led to the growth and establishment of Popery, which he well describes as consisting not merely in the political and ecclesiastical authority of the Bishop of Rome, but in the assertion and exercise of the pretension, wherever vested, of lording it over the consciences of others; of making inquisition into
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Micaiah Towgood. (search)
and perplexed discussion, and on which so many wise and excellent men were arranged on both sides, was, at all events, not essential to salvation. In this secluded situation he remained for about fifteen years, passed in the exemplary discharge of the pastoral duties; his uniform and even course unmarked by any memorable event, except his marriage to the daughter of James Hawker, Esq., of Luppit, in the county of Devon. By this lady he had four children, one of whom only survived him. In 1737 he removed to Crediton, where he pursued the same useful plans for the improvement of his hearers which he had adopted in his original settlement—being instant in season and out of season, exhorting with all longsuffering and doctrine. In this year Mr. Towgood made his first appearance as an author in support of that cause of religious liberty of which he became afterwards so able and effective an advocate, by the publication of a small pamphlet entitled High-flown Episcopal and Priestly P