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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 39 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 4 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 3 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition.. You can also browse the collection for 1744 AD or search for 1744 AD in all documents.

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e resignation of the Earl of Chesterfield, he escaped from the embarrassments of American affairs by taking the seals for the Northern Department. Those of the Southern, which included the colonies, were intrusted to the Duke of Bedford. The new secretary was a man of inflexible honesty and good — will to his country, untainted by duplicity or timidity. His abilities were not brilliant; but his inheritance of the rank and fortune of his elder brother gave him political consideration. In 1744, he had entered the Pelham ministry as First Lord of the Admiralty, bringing with him to that board George Grenville and the Earl of Sandwich. In that station his orders to Warren contributed essentially to the conquest of Louisburg. Thus his attention was drawn to the New World as the scene of his own glory. In the last war he had cherished the darling project of conquering Canada, and the great and practicable views for America were said by Pitt to have sprung from him alone. Proud of h
Indians was excited. Where, said the deputy of chap. IV.} 1752. the Delaware chiefs, where lie the lands of the Indians? The French claim all on one side of the river, and the English on the other. Virginia, under the treaty of Lancaster, of 1744, assumed the right to appropriate to her jurisdiction all the lands as far west as the Mississippi. In May, 1752, her commissioners met chiefs of the Mingoes, Shawnees and Ohio Indians, at Logstown. It was pretended Lieut. Gov. Dinwiddie of V their customs to treat of affairs in the woods and weeds. Col. William Johnson to Governor Clinton, 26 March, 1753, in New York Documentary History, II. 624. Plain Facts, 38, 44. We never understood, said the Half-King, that the lands sold in 1744, were to extend farther to the sunsetting than the hill on the other side the Alleghany Hill. We now see and know that the French design to cheat us out of our lands. They plan nothing but mischief, for they have struck our friends, the Miamis;