hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 61 61 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 34 34 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 19 19 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 10 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 7 7 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 4 4 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 4 4 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks). You can also browse the collection for 1751 AD or search for 1751 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

y-five; a fair average. They vote not to send a representative this year. The love of office was cold in the hearts of our fathers, compared with the burning desire for it in our day. It was so common to refuse even the highest offices, that penalty for refusing became necessary, and our records are full of such notices as the following:-- 1728: Mr. Peter Tufts, refusing to take the office of Constable, paid in his money, as the law directs, to the town-treasury. At a later period (1751), the town voted, that if any one refused to take the office to which he had been elected, he should pay into the treasury £ 1. 6s. 8d., lawful money. In 1632, the people of Plymouth enact, that whoever refuses the office of Governor shall pay £ 20, unless he was chose two years going. Feb. 9, 1729: The inhabitants of Medford took a deep interest in supporting the rights secured by the Charter; and readily paid their share in supporting agents. On this day they voted to carry round a sub
Senator,1852. E. C. Baker, Senator,1855. Representatives of Medford in the General Court. Peter Tuftschosen1689. Peter Tufts1690. Nathaniel Wade1692. Peter Tufts1694. Thomas Willis1703. Ebenezer Brooks1704. Thomas Willis1705. Stephen Willis1708. Thomas Tufts1714. Peter Tufts1715. Thomas Tufts1718. John Bradshaw1722. Samuel Brooks1723. John Allfordchosen1726. Benjamin Willis1730. William Willis1735. John Hall1741. William Willis1742. Andrew Hall1744. Stephen Hall1751. Samuel Brooks1762. Stephen Hall1763. Benjamin Hall1770. Simon Tufts1772. Benjamin Hall1775. Thomas Brooks1776. T. Brooks, (under the Constitution)1780. Thomas Brooks1781. Aaron Hall1782. John Brooks1785. James Wyman1787. Thomas Brooks1788. Ebenezer Hall1789. Nathaniel Hall1800. Timothy Bigelow1808. Dudley Hall1813. Abner Bartlett1815. Turell Tufts1824. Thatcher Magoun1825. John B. Fitch1826. John Sparrell1831. Thomas R. Peck1833. Frederick A. Kendall1834. Timothy Cott
edford; occasional, 15: total, 165. May 18, 1774: Voted that Mr. Turell should lave three hundred pounds (old tenor) as annual salary, in order to make his salary now equal to what it was when he settled among us. May 15, 1749: Mr. Turell's salary was raised to five hundred pounds (old tenor). These votes reveal the perilous changes in the value of money, which then so perplexed and distressed the colonies. It made it necessary to vote the minister's salary each year: accordingly, in 1751, we find the salary stated in the new, or, as it was sometimes called, the middle tenor, £ 73. 6s. 8d. It was the custom of those days to introduce domestic joys and sorrows into the pulpit. A slave, named Sharper, and owned by Mr. Turell, was very ill, and his master preached on the Sabbath from these words: My servant lieth at home sick. Sharper died just as the sermon was ended. When Mr. Turell wooed and won the beautiful Miss Jane Colman, daughter of Rev. Dr. Colman, of Boston, whos
lodgett, 1752; Blunt, 1748; Boutwell, 1753; Bradish, 1745; Brattle, 1747; Bucknam, 1766; Budge, 1762; Burdit, 1761; Burns, 1751; Bushby, 1735; Butterfield, 1785. Calif, 1750; Chadwick, 1756; Cook, 1757; Cousins, 1755; Crease, 1757; Crowell, 1752. 732; Giles, 1719; Gill, 1738; Goddard, 1745; Gowen, 1773; Grace, 1779; Greatton, 1718; Green, 1785. Hosmer, 1746; Hunt, 1751. Kendall, 1752; Kettle, or Kettell, 1740. Lathe, Laithe, and Leathe, 1738; Learned, 1793; Le Bosquet, 1781. Mack,d, 1759; May, 1759; MacCarthy, 1747; MacClinton, 1750; Mead, 1757; Melendy, 1732; Morrill, 1732. Newell, 1767; Newhall, 1751; Nutting, 1729. Oakes, 1721-75. Page, 1747; Pain, 1767; Parker, 1754; Penhallow, 1767; Polly, 1748; Poole, 1732; Pown, 1764; Tompson, 1718; Trowbridge, 1787; Turner, 1729; Tuttle, 1729; Tyzick, 1785. Wait, 1725; Waite, 1785; Wakefield, 1751; Walker, 1779; Ward, 1718; Waters, 1721; Watson, 1729; White, 1749; Whitney, 1768; William, 1762; Williston, 1769; Winship