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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 55 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 35 35 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 16 16 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 8 8 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 7 7 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 6 6 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 3 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1753 AD or search for 1753 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 55 results in 46 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aliquippa, (search)
Aliquippa, An Indian queen who dwelt at the confluence of the Monongahela and Youghiogheny, in the southeastern part of Alleghany county, Pa., at the time of Washington's expedition to Fort Le Boeuf 1753). She had complained of his neglect in not calling on her on his outward journey, so he visited her in returning. With an apology, he gave the queen a coat and a bottle of rum. The latter. Washington wrote, was thought the much better present of the two, and harmony of feeling was soon restored. Aliquippa was a woman of great muscular and mental strength, and had performed such brave deeds that she was held in reverence by the Indians of western Pennsylvania.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
the Admiralty. In the spring of 1741 he was appointed cofferer to the Prince of Wales and surveyor-general of the Duchy lands in Cornwall. After having ruled Maryland in person and by deputy more than thirty years, he died April 24, 1751, at his home in London. Vi. Frederick Calvert, sixth and last Lord Baltimore, Was born in 1731, and succeeded to the title of his father, Charles Calvert II., in 1751. He married Lady Diiana Egerton, youngest daughter of the Duke of Bridgewater, in 1753. He led a disreputable life, and died at the age of forty, at Naples, Sept. 14, 1771. Yet he was a patron of literature and a friend and companion of the Earl of Chatham (Pitt). In 1767 he published an account of his Tour in the East. He was a pretentious author of several other works, mostly of a weak character. Lord Frederick bequeathed the province of Maryland, in tail male, to Henry Harford, then a child, and the remainder, in fee, to his sister. the Hon. Mrs. Norton. He left an est
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 (search)
Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 Bishop of Cloyne; born in Kilcrin, Kilkenny, Ireland, March 12, 1684; was educated at Trinity College, Dublin; became a Fellow there; and at an early age wrote on scientific subjects. Between 1710 and 1713 his two famous works appeared, in which he denies the existence of matter, and argues that it is not without the mind, but within it, and that that which is called matter is only an impression produced by divine power on the mind by the invariable laws of nature. On a tour in France he visited the French philosopher Malebranche, who became so excited by a discussion with Berkeley on the non-existence of matter that, being ill at the time, he died a few days afterwards. Miss Vanhomrigh (Swift's Vanessa ) bequeathed to Berkeley $20,000: and in 1728 his income was increased $5,500 a year by being made Dean of Derry. Berkeley conceived a plan for establishing a college in the Bermudas for the instruction of pastors for the colonial churches and missiona
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clinton, George 1739- (search)
s. He was unlettered; and being closely connected with the Dukes of Newcastle and Bedford, he was sent to New York to mend his fortune. In his controversies with the Assembly he was ably assisted by the pen of Dr. Cadwallader Colden, afterwards lieutenant-governor of the province. His chief opponent was Daniel Horsmanden, at one time chief-justice of the colony. After violent quarrels with all the political factions in New York, he abandoned the government in disgust, and returned home in 1753. He became governor of Greenwich Hospital — a sinecure. In 1745 he was vice-admiral of the red, and in 1757 admiral of the fleet. He died while governor of Newfoundland, July 10, 1761. Vice-President of the United States from 1805 to 1812; Republican; born in Little Britain, Ulster co., N. Y., July 26, 1739; was carefully educated by his father and a Scotch clergyman, a graduate of the University of Aberdeen. In early youth George made a successful cruise in a privateer in the Fren
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbia University, (search)
colonies; originally named King's College; afterwards Columbia College; and in 1896 Columbia University. In 1746 an act was passed by the colonial Assembly of New York for raising £ 2,250, by lottery, for the encouragement of learning and towards the founding of a college. The sum was increased in 1751, and intrusted to ten trustees, one of whom was a Presbyterian, two were of the Dutch Reformed Church, and seven were Episcopalians. Rev. Samuel Johnson, of Stratford, Conn., was invited, in 1753, to become president of the proposed institution, and a royal charter constituting King's College was granted Oct. 31, 1754. The organization was effected in May, 1755. The persons named in the charter as governors of the college were the Archbishop of Canterbury, the principal civil officers of the colony, the principal clergymen of the five denominations of Christians in the city of New York, and twenty private gentlemen. The college opened July 17, 1754, with a class of eight, under D
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Lancey, James, 1703-1760 (search)
; graduated at the University of Cambridge, England, and soon after his return to New York (1729) was made a justice of the Supreme Court of that province, and chiefjustice in 1733. For two years, as lieutenant-governor, he was acting governor (1753-55), after the death of Governor Osborn. Judge De Lancey was for many years the most influential man in the politics and legislation of the colony, and was one of the founders of King's College (now Columbia University). He wrote a Review of the mto New York (1729) was made a justice of the Supreme Court of that province, and chiefjustice in 1733. For two years, as lieutenant-governor, he was acting governor (1753-55), after the death of Governor Osborn. Judge De Lancey was for many years the most influential man in the politics and legislation of the colony, and was one of the founders of King's College (now Columbia University). He wrote a Review of the military operations from 1753 to 1756. He died in New York City, July 30, 1760.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eustis, William, 1753-1825 (search)
Eustis, William, 1753-1825 Physician; born in Cambridge, Mass., June 10, 1753; died in Boston, Feb. 6, 1825; was graduated at Harvard in 1772, and studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren. As a surgeon he served throughout the Revolutionary War, and was a member of the Massachusetts legislature from 1788 to 1794. He was in the governor's council two years, and was in Congress from 1800 to 1805, and from 1820 to 1823. Secretary of War from 1809 until 1812, he then resigned, for there was much fault found with his administration. In 1815 he was sent as minister to Holland, and was governor of Massachusetts in 1824, dying while in office, Feb. 6, 1825.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
ed many wise and useful maxims, mostly from the ancients. Franklin was soon marked as a wise, prudent, and sagacious man, full of well-directed public spirit. He was the chief founder of the Philadelphia Library in 1731. He became clerk of the Provincial Assembly in 1736, and postmaster of Philadelphia the next year. He was the founder of the University of Pennsylvania and the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia in 1744, and was elected a member of the Provincial Assembly in 1750. In 1753 he was appointed deputy postmaster for the English-American colonies; and in 1754 he was a delegate to the Colonial Congress of Albany, in which he prepared a plan of union for the colonies, which was the basis of the Articles of Confederation (see Confederation, articles of) adopted by Congress more than twenty years afterwards. Franklin had begun his investigations and experiments in electricity, by which he demonstrated its identity with lightning as early as 1746. The publication of h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Frelinghuysen, Frederick 1753- (search)
Frelinghuysen, Frederick 1753- Lawyer; born in Somerset county, N. J., April 13, 1753; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1770, and became an eminent lawyer. He was a member of the Continental Congress much of the time during the Revolutionary War, and served Theodore Frelinghuysen. as a captain in the army. Afterwards he filled various State and county offices, and in 1790 was appointed by Washington to lead an expedition against the western Indians, with the rank of major-general. In 1793 he was chosen United States-Senator, and served three years. He died April 13, 1804.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garfield, James Abram 1831-1881 (search)
he valley of the Ohio. In 1751 a British trading-post was established on the Big Miami; but in the following year it was destroyed by the French. Many similar efforts of the English colonists were resisted by the French; and during the years 1751-53 it became manifest that a great struggle was imminent between the French and the English for the possession of the West. The British ministers were too much absorbed in intrigues at home to appreciate the importance of this contest; and they did but little more than to permit the colonies to protect their rights in the valley of the Ohio. In 1753 the Ohio Company had opened a road, by Will's Creek, into the western valley, and were preparing to locate their colony. At the same time the French had sent a force to occupy and hold the line of the Ohio. As the Ohio Company was under the especial protection of Virginia, the governor of that colony determined to send a messenger to the commander of the French forces and demand the reason
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