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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 105 105 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 73 73 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 59 59 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 10 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. 5 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1754 AD or search for 1754 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 105 results in 91 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 (search)
Baldwin, Abraham, 1754-1807 Legislator; born in Guilford, Conn., Nov. 6, 1754; originated the University of Georgia, and was its president for several years; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1785-88, and a member of the Constitutional Convention in 1787. In 1789-99 he was a Representative in Congress, and was then elected to the United States Senate, of which he was president pro tem. in 1801-02. He died in Washington, D. C., March 4, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Joel, 1754- (search)
Barlow, Joel, 1754- Poet; born in Reading, Conn., March 24, 1754; was graduated at Yale College in 1778; studied theology and was licensed a Congregational minister; and from 1778 to 1783 was a chaplain in the army, writing patriotic songs and addresses to keep up the spirits of the soldiers. When the army was disbanded (1783) he settled at Hartford, where he began to study law, and was admitted to the bar in 1785. He had tried book-selling; Joel Barlow. and, in 1792, he established a weekly newspaper, entitled the American mercury, published at Westford. His poetic talents becoming widely known, he was requested by several Congregational ministers to revise the phraseology of Watts's hymns. He also attempted to revise the Bible in the same way. A cousin of Benedict Arnold, who would talk in doggerel rhyme, was asked by Barlow to give him a specimen of his poetic talent. Arnold looked the poet sharply in the face, and said, instantly: You've proved yourself a sinful cr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burbeck, Henry, 1754-1848 (search)
Burbeck, Henry, 1754-1848 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., June 8. 1754; served with distinction in the Revolutionary War; took part in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, etc., receiving the brevet of brigadier-general in 1813. He died in New London, Conn., Oct. 2, 1848.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
Burr, Aaron, 1716- educator; born in Fairfield, Conn., Jan. 4, 1716; was of German descent; graduated at Yale College in 1735; and ordained by the presbytery of east Jersey in 1737. He became pastor at Newark. N. J., where he was chiefly instrumental in founding the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and was elected its president in 1748. In 1752 he married a daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the metaphysician. In 1754 he accompanied Whitefield to Boston. He died Sept. 24, 1757. Vice-President of the United States; born at Newark. N. .J., Feb. 6, 1756; a son of Rev. Aaron Burr, President of the College of New Jersey, and of a daughter of the eminent theologian, Jonathan Edwards. When nineteen years of age, he entered the Continental army, at Cambridge, as a private soldier, and as such accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. From the line of that expedition, in the wilderness. Arnold sent him with despatches to General Montgomery, at Montreal, wh
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Thomas, 1754-1805 (search)
Butler, Thomas, 1754-1805 Military officer: born in Pennsylvania in 1754; was in almost every important battle in the Middle States during the Revolution. At Brandy-wine and at Monmouth he received the thanks of his commanders (Washington and Wayne) for skill and bravery. In 1791 he commanded a battalion under St. Clair, and was twice wounded at the defeat of that leader, where his brother Richard was killed. He died in New Orleans Sept. 7, 1805. Butler, Thomas, 1754-1805 Military officer: born in Pennsylvania in 1754; was in almost every important battle in the Middle States during the Revolution. At Brandy-wine and at Monmouth he received the thanks of his commanders (Washington and Wayne) for skill and bravery. In 1791 he commanded a battalion under St. Clair, and was twice wounded at the defeat of that leader, where his brother Richard was killed. He died in New Orleans Sept. 7, 1805.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Caswell, Richard 1729-1789 (search)
Caswell, Richard 1729-1789 Military officer; born in Maryland, Aug. 3, 1729: went to North Carolina in 1746, and practised law there, serving in the Assembly from 1754 to 1771, and being speaker in 1770. In the battle of the Allamance he commanded Tryon's right wing, but soon afterwards identified himself with the cause of the patriots, and was a member of the Continental Congress (1774-75). For three years he was president of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina, and was governor of the State from 1777 to 1779. In February, 1776, he was in command of the patriot troops in the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, and received the thanks of Congress and the commission of majorgeneral for the victory there achieved. He led the State troops in the battle near Camden (August, 1780); and was controller-general in 1782. He was again governor in 1784-86; and a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution. While presiding as speaker in the North Carolina Assembly he
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cleaveland, Moses 1754-1806 (search)
Cleaveland, Moses 1754-1806 Pioneer: born in Canterbury. Conn., Jan. 29, 1754; graduated at Yale College in 1777; admitted to the bar; made a brigadier-general in 1796; and the same year was selected by a land company, of which he was a shareholder, to survey the tract which had been purchased in northeastern Ohio. He set out with fifty emigrants from Schenectady, N. Y.; reached the mouth of the Cuyahoga on July 22; and finding it a favorable site for a town decided to settle there. His employers called the place Cleaveland in his honor. When the first newspaper, the Cleveland Advertiser, was established, the head-line was found to be too long for the form, and the editor cut out the letter a, which revision was accepted by the public. General Cleaveland died in Canterbury, Conn., Nov. 16, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colonial settlements. (search)
n our national Constitution) of bringing her supreme authority to bear not alone upon the colonies as political corporations, but, what was much more effectual, upon the colonists as individuals. At the beginning of the French and Indian War (1754), the period when the American people set up for themselves in political and social life, there was no exact enumeration of the inhabitants; but from a careful examination of official records, Mr. Bancroft estimated the number as follows: Colon0040,000 Georgia5,0002,000 —————— Total1,165,000 260,000 At this period the extent of the territorial possessions of England and France in America was well defined on maps published by Evans and Mitchell—that of the latter (a new edition) in 1754. The British North American colonies stretched coastwise along the Atlantic about 1,000 miles, but inland their extent was very limited. New France, as the French settlers called their claimed territory in America, extended over a vastly
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 William Leete1661 to 1665 Governors of Connecticut Name.Date John Winthrop1665 to 1676 William Leete1676 to 1683 Robert Treat1683 to 1687 Edmund Andros1687 to 1689 Robert Treat1689 to 1698 Fitz John Winthrop1698 to 1707 Gurdon Saltonstall1707 to 1724 Joseph Talcott1724 to 1741 Jonathan Law1741 to 1750 Roger Wolcott1750 to 1754 Thomas Fitch1754 to 1766 William Pitkin1766 to 1769 Jonathan Trumbull1769 to 1784 Mathew Griswold1784 to 1786 Samuel Huntington1786 to 1796 Oliver Wolcott1796 to 1798 Jonathan Trumbull1798 to 1809 John Treadwell1809 to 1811 Roger Griswold1811 to 1813 John Cotton Smith1813 to 1817 Oliver Wolcott1817 to 1827 Gideon Tomlinson1827 to 1831 John S. Peters1831 to 1833 H. W. Edwards1833 to 1834 Samuel A. Foote1834 to 1835 H. W. Edwards1835 to 1838 W. W. Ellsworth1838 to 1842 O. F. Cleveland1842 to 18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Contrecoeur 1730- (search)
Contrecoeur 1730- Military officer; born in France about 1730; came to America as an officer in the French army; and in 1754 went up the Alleghany River with 1,000 men to prevent the British from making settlements in the Ohio Valley, which France claimed under the treaty of Aix. The British fort on the site of Pittsburg was taken by Contrecoeur, and renamed Fort Duquesne. When Braddock, with over 2,000 troops, advanced against it, Captain Beaujeu, who had arrived to relieve the place, routed the army of Braddock, July 9, 1755. Although Contrecoeur remained in the fort he was wrongly given the credit of the victory, and as Beaujeu had fallen he continued in command. To him were due the subsequent Indian atrocities.
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