Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1755 AD or search for 1755 AD in all documents.

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d of Chancellorsville. He was the first, in 1716, to lead an expedition across the Blue ridge into the famous Shenandoah valley, and in 1730 became the deputy postmaster-general of all the colonies. When the French and Indian war of 1750 began, and France claimed the territory drained by the Ohio, Virginia had a young Washington to send on a diplomatic errand to the French, at the head of that river; to lead her citizen soldiery, in 1754, in the unequal combat of the Great Meadows, and in 1755 to save from complete disaster the British regulars under Braddock. When England attempted taxation without representation, in 1765, her Patrick Henry fired the colonies to resistance. In 1769 she called a revolutionary convention, which denounced the acts of the British parliament. In 1774 she sent representatives to the first Continental Congress, in the persons of Peyton Randolph, Richard Henry Lee, George Washington, Patrick Henry, Richard Bland and Edmund Pendleton, all men of mark, w
ery. Brigadier-General William Henry Fitzhugh Payne Brigadier-General William Henry Fitzhugh Payne, a distinguished cavalry commander of the army of Northern Virginia, was born at Clifton, the homestead of his family in Virginia, January 27, 1830. His family, prominently associated with the history of the Old Dominion, was founded in America by John Payne, who with his brother William came to the colony in 1620. Fourth in descent from John Payne was Capt. William Payne, who was born in 1755 at Wakefield, Westmoreland county, the birthplace of George Washington. He did an extensive business as a merchant at Falmouth and Fredericksburg, served three years in the Continental army, including the battles of Guilford Court House and Yorktown, and died at Clifton in 1837. By his second marriage, to Marian Morson, of Scottish descent, he had one son, Arthur A. M. Payne, born at Clifton in 1804, who was a prominent man, and widely known as a breeder of fine horses, among them Passenge