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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 118 118 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 52 52 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 50 50 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 15 15 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 11 11 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. 5 5 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 4 4 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1760 AD or search for 1760 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
Abolition. During the early years of our national history, abolition was a desire rather than a purpose, and every humane and thinking man, North and South, was an abolitionist. Previous to the meeting of the first Continental Congress, in 1774, many of the colonies had made protests against the further importation of slaves, and at least two of them, Virginia and Massachusetts, had passed resolutions abolishing the traffic. The Quakers, or Society of Friends, had, since 1760, made slave-holding and slave-trading a matter of church discipline. The War for Independence, and the adoption of the Constitution, in 1787, which included the compromise resolution that provided for the continuation of the slave-trade, by permission, until 1808, caused very little change in the sentiment of the people, and all hoped that in some way, not yet imagined, the gradual and peaceful abolition of slavery would be accomplished. In 1777, Vermont, not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State cons
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barre, Isaac, 1726-1802 (search)
nd, in 1726. His parents Isaac Barre. were French, his father being a small tradesman in Dublin. Isaac entered the British army at the age of twenty-one, and participated in the expedition against Louisburg in 1758. Wolfe was his friend, and appointed him major of brigade; and in May, 1759, he was made adjutant-general of Wolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, by which he lost the sight of one eye. Barre served under Amherst in 1760; and was the official bearer of the news of the surrender of Montreal to England. In 1761 he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and the same year he obtained a seat in Parliament, where he found himself in opposition to the ministry. For this offence he was deprived of his offices, given him as a reward for his services in America. He was the warm friend of the colonies, and made able speeches in Parliament in their favor. Barre was one of the supposed authors of the Letters of Junius.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beakman, Daniel Frederick, 1760-1869 (search)
Beakman, Daniel Frederick, 1760-1869 Soldier; born in New Jersey about 1760; enlisted in 1778, and served throughout the Revolutionary War; was the last surviving pensioner of that war. In 1867 Congress passed a special act, giving him a pension of $500 during life. He died in Sandusky, N. Y., April 5, 1869. Beakman, Daniel Frederick, 1760-1869 Soldier; born in New Jersey about 1760; enlisted in 1778, and served throughout the Revolutionary War; was the last surviving pensioner of that war. In 1867 Congress passed a special act, giving him a pension of $500 during life. He died in Sandusky, N. Y., April 5, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beebe, Bezaleel, 1741-1824 (search)
Beebe, Bezaleel, 1741-1824 Military officer; born in Litchfield, Conn., April 28, 1741; was one of the Rogers Rangers, and was engaged in the fight in which Putnam was taken, also in the capture of Montreal in 1760. In July, 1775, he was commissioned lieutenant and sent to Boston. In 1776 he saw active service in New York and New Jersey, and was taken prisoner at the capture of Fort Washington and confined in New York nearly a year. Towards the end of the Revolution he was appointed brigadier-general and commander of all the Connecticut troops for sea-coast defence. He died in Litchfield, May 29, 1824.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 (search)
Bernard, Sir Francis, 1714-1779 Colonial governor; born in Nettleham, Lincoln co., England, in 1714: was educated at Oxford, where he was graduated in 1736. The law was his chosen profession. In 1758 he was appointed governor of New Jersey; and in 1760 he was transferred to the chief magistracy of Massachusetts, where he was a most obedient servant of the crown and ministry in the support of measures obnoxious to the colonists. After a stormy administration of nearly nine years Bernard was recalled, when he was created a baronet, chiefly because of his recommendation to transfer the right of selecting the governor's council from the colonial legislature to the crown. Bernard was a friend of learning, and gave a part of his library to Harvard College. He had become so thoroughly unpopular that when he left Boston the bells were rung, cannon were fired, and Liberty-tree was hung with flags, in token of the joy of the people. He died in Aylesbury, England, June 16, 1779.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boone, Thomas, (search)
Boone, Thomas, Colonial governor; appointed governor of New Jersey in 1760, and of South Carolina in 1762. He quarrelled with the legislature of South Carolina, which refused to hold any intercourse with him, and in 1763 was succeeded as governor by William Bull.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Braxton, Carter, 1736-1797 (search)
Braxton, Carter, 1736-1797 A signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Newington, Va., Sept. 10. 1736; was educated at the College of William and Mary in 1756, and resided in England until 1760. He was a distinguished member and patriot in the Virginia House of Burgesses in supporting the resolutions of Patrick Henry in 1765, and in subsequent assemblies dissolved by the governor. He remained in the Virginia Assembly until royal rule ceased in that colony, and was active in measures for defeating the schemes of Lord Dunmore. Braxton was in the convention at Richmond in 1775, for devising measures for the defence of the colony and the public good; and in December he became the successor of Peyton Randolph in Congress. He remained in that body to vote for and sign the Declaration of Independence. In 1786, after serving in the Virginia legislature, he became one of the executive council. He died in Richmond, Va., Oct. 10, 1797.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Breckenridge, John, 1760-1806 (search)
Breckenridge, John, 1760-1806 Statesman; born in Augusta county. Va., Dec. 2, 1760; was admitted to the bar in 1785; elected to Congress in 1793 but did not accept, having determined to remove to Kentucky, where he settled near Lexington. He was appointed attorney-general of Kentucky in 1795. In 1798 he met Jefferson and Nicholas at Monticello and prepared the famous Kentucky resolutions of 1798, of which Jefferson claimed the authorship. In 1801 he was elected to the United States Senate, and resigned in 1805 to become Attorney-General under President Jefferson, which office he filled about four months. He died in Lexington, Ky., Dec. 14, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bute, John Stuart, Earl of, (search)
tates when he was ten years of age; and, in 1736, married the only daughter of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. In February, 1737, he was selected one of the sixteen representative peers of Scotland, and appointed lord of the bedchamber of the Prince of Wales in 1738. The beautiful Princess of Wales gave him her confidence on the death of her husband in 1751, and made him preceptor of her son, afterwards King George III. Over that youth he gained great influence. When he ascended the throne, in 1760, George promoted Bute to a privy councillor, and, afterwards, a secretary of state; and, when Pitt and the Duke of Newcastle retired from the cabinet, Bute was made prime minister. He soon became unpopular, chiefly because the King had discarded the great Pitt, and preferred this Scotch adventurer, whose bad advice was misleading his sovereign. Insinuations were rife about the too intimate personal relations of Bute and the young King's mother, who, it was believed, ruled both the King and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Butler, Richard, 1760- (search)
Butler, Richard, 1760- Military officer; born in Ireland; came to America before 1760; was a lieutenant-colonel in the Pennsylvania line in the Continental army, and also of Morgan's rifle corps in 1777. Butler served throughout the war; was agent for Indian affairs in Ohio in 1787; and was with St. (lair in his expedition against the Indians, late in 1791, commanding the right wing of his army, with the rank of major-general. In that expedition he was killed by Indians in a battle in Ohid, 1760- Military officer; born in Ireland; came to America before 1760; was a lieutenant-colonel in the Pennsylvania line in the Continental army, and also of Morgan's rifle corps in 1777. Butler served throughout the war; was agent for Indian affairs in Ohio in 1787; and was with St. (lair in his expedition against the Indians, late in 1791, commanding the right wing of his army, with the rank of major-general. In that expedition he was killed by Indians in a battle in Ohio, Nov. 4, 1791.
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