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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 84 84 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 61 61 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 34 34 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 10 10 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 10 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 9 9 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 6 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 6 6 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 4 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1762 AD or search for 1762 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Benjamin, -1849 (search)
Abbot, Benjamin, -1849 Educator; born, 1762. He was graduated at Harvard in 1788. Phillips Academy, Exeter, N. H., was conducted by him until 1838. Among his pupils were George Bancroft, Lewis Cass, Edward Everett, John G. Palfry, Jared Sparks, and Daniel Webster. He died in Exeter, N. H., Oct. 25, 1849.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allen, Ethan, 1737- (search)
Allen, Ethan, 1737- military officer; born in Litchfield, Conn., Jan. 10, 1737. In 1762 he was one of the proprietors of the ironworks at Salisbury, Conn. In 1766) he went to the then almost unsettled domain between the Green Mountains and Lake Champlain, where he was a bold leader of the settlers on the New Hampshire grants in their controversy with the authorities of New York. (See New Hampshire.) During this period several pamphlets were written by Allen, in his peculiar style, which forcibly illustrated the injustice of the action of the New York authorities. The latter declared Allen an outlaw. and offered a reward of £ 150 for his arrest. He defied his enemies, and persisted in his course. Early in May, 1775, he led a few men and took the fortress of Ticonderoga. His followers were called Green Mountain boys. His success as a partisan caused him to be sent twice into Canada, during the latter half of 1775, to win the people over to the republican cause. In the las
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Apache Indians, (search)
A branch of the Athabascan stock. They are mostly wanderers, and have roamed as marauders over portions of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona, in the United States, and several of the northern provinces of Mexico, Wanderers, they do not cultivate the soil, and have only temporary chiefs to lead them. Civil government they have none. Divided into many roving bands, they resisted all attempts by the Spanish to civilize and Christianize them, but constantly attacked these europeans. So early as 1762, it was estimated that the Apaches had desolated and depopulated 174 mining towns, stations, and missions in the province of Sonora alone. For fifty years a bold chief — Mangas Colorado — led powerful bands to war; and since the annexation of their territory to the United States, they have given its government more trouble than any of the Western Indians. Colorado was killed in 1863. Though fierce in war, they never scalp or torture their enemies. A Great Spirit is the central figure in t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asgill, Sir Charles, 1762-1823 (search)
Asgill, Sir Charles, 1762-1823 British military officer; born in England. April 7, 1762. He was among the troops under Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, where he held the position of captain. Late in 1781, Capt. Joseph Huddy, serving in the New Jersey line. was in charge of a block-house on Toms River, Monmouth co., N. J. There he and his little garrison were captured in March, 1782, by a band of refugee loyalists sent by the Board of associated loyalists of New York, of which ex-Governor Franklin, of New Jersey, was president, and taken to that city. On April 8, these prisoners were put in charge of Capt. Richard Lippincott. a New Jersey loyalist, who took them in a sloop to the British guard-ship at Sandy Hook. There Huddy was falsely charged with being concerned in the death of Philip White. a desperate Tory. who was killed Capt, Charles Asgill. White, a desperate Tory, who was killed while trying to escape from his guard. While a prisoner, Huddy was taken by Lipp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ashe, John, 1720- (search)
Ashe, John, 1720- Military officer: born in Grovely, Brunswick co., N. C., in 1720; was in the North Carolina legislature for several years, and was speaker in 1762-65. He warmly opposed the Stamp Act: assisted Governor Tryon in suppressing the Regulator movement in 1771, but soon afterwards became a zealous Whig. He was an active patriot, and because he led 500 men to destroy Fort Johnson he was denounced as a rebel. Raising and equipping a regiment at his own expense, he was appointed brigadier-general of the Wilmington District in April. 1776. He joined Lincoln in South Carolina in 1778; and after he was defeated at Brier Creek, in March, 1779, he returned home. General Ashe suffered much at the hands of the British at Wilmington after the battle at Guilford, and died of small-pox, which he had contracted in prison, in Sampson county, N. C., Oct. 24, 1781.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacolor, (search)
Bacolor, A town in Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the road from Manila to Tarlac; about 30 miles northwest of the former city. During the British invasion of the Philippines, in 1762, it was for some time the capital of the group, the Spaniards, under fear lest the city of Manila should be bombarded, hastily removing their seat of government. The town attracted considerable attention in 1899 because of the United States military operations against the Filipino insurgents and the remarkable chase after Aguinaldo through that section of Luzon. See Aguinaldo, Emilio; Luzon.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bollan, William, 1740-1776 (search)
Bollan, William, 1740-1776 Lawyer; born in England; came to America about 1740, and settled in Boston. He married a daughter of Governor Shirley, of Massachusetts, and was appointed collector of customs at Salem and Marblehead. In 1745 he was sent to England to solicit the reimbursement of more than $800,000 advanced by Massachusetts for the expedition against Cape Breton. He was successful ; and became agent for Massachusetts in 1762, but was dismissed. Being in England in 1769, he obtained copies of thirty-three letters written by Governor Bernard and General Gage, calumniating the colonists, and sent then to Boston. For this act he was denounced in Parliament. He strongly recommended the British government to pursue conciliatory measures towards the colonists in 1775: and in various ways, in person and in writing, he showed his warm friendship for the Americans. Mr. Bollan wrote several political pamphlets relating to American affairs: and in 1774 he presented. as colo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boone, Thomas, (search)
Boone, Thomas, Colonial governor; appointed governor of New Jersey in 1760, and of South Carolina in 1762. He quarrelled with the legislature of South Carolina, which refused to hold any intercourse with him, and in 1763 was succeeded as governor by William Bull.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1766 (search)
Bouquet, Henry, 1719-1766 Military officer: born in Rolle, Switzerland, in 1719. In 1748 he was lieutenant-colonel of the Swiss Guard in the service of Holland; and he entered the English service with the same rank in 1756. In 1762 he was made colonel, and in 1765 brigadier-general. Bouquet was active in western Pennsylvania in connection with operations against Fort Duquesne; also in relieving Fort Pitt in 1763. During Pontiac's war Fort Pitt (now Pittsburg, Pa.) was in imminent danger, and Colonel Bouquet was sent to its relief. He arrived at Fort Bedford, in western Pennsylvania, on July 25, 1763, in the neighborhood of which eighteen persons had been made prisoners or scalped by the Indians. The barbarians were then besieging Fort Pitt. As soon as they heard of the approach of Bouquet, they raised the siege with the intention of meeting and attacking him. Uncertain of their strength and motives, Bouquet left Fort Bedford and went to Fort Ligonier, where he left his wago
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