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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 185 185 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 115 115 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 50 50 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 13 13 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 11 11 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 9 9 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for 1763 AD or search for 1763 AD in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestry.—1764-1805. (search)
in large game—must have produced a sort of Western fever among them. Many of his listeners had no doubt served in the Nova Scotia campaigns against the French which culminated in the capture of Louisburg in 1758, followed by that of Quebec in 1759, and the British occupation of the St. John as far as the Nashwaak; and were already aware of the natural advantages of the territory. The first Essex County migration to Nova Scotia (as New Brunswick was then called) took place in the spring of 1763 in a packet sloop of forty tons burthen, Hatheway's Hist. New Brunswick, p. 7. commanded by Captain Newman. The following spring brought a reinforcement of colonists in the sloop commanded by Captain Howe, which became an annual Ibid., p. 8. trader to the River, and the only means of communication between the Pilgrims and their native land. The arrival was most timely, for an early frost had blighted Ibid., p. 10. the crop of the previous year, and reduced the firstcomers almost