hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 2 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1765 AD or search for 1765 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 105 results in 94 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fanning, Edmund -1818 (search)
Fanning, Edmund -1818 Jurist; born on Long Island, N. Y., in 1737; graduated at Yale College in 1757, and settled as a lawyer in Hillsboro, N. C., where he became popular, and was made colonel of Orange county (1763) and clerk of the Supreme Court (1765). He was also a member of the legislature, and married the daughter of Governor Tryon. He became rapacious, and by his exorbitant legal fees made himself very obnoxious to the people. Their hatred was increased by his energetic exertions in suppressing the Regulator movement (see Regulators). He fled to New York with Governor Tryon to avoid the consequences of popular indignation. He was appointed surveyor-general of North Carolina in 1774. In 1776 he raised and led a force called the King's American Regiment of Foot. After the Revolution he went to Nova Scotia, where he became a councillor and lieutenant-governor in September, Edmund Fanning. 1783, and from 1786 to 1805 was governor of Prince Edward's Island. He rose to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fauquier, Francis 1720- (search)
Fauquier, Francis 1720- Colonial governor; born in Virginia about 1720. When Dinwiddie was recalled in 1758 Fauquier succeeded as lieutenant-governor; and when the Assembly in 1764 adopted Patrick Henry's resolution declaring that the sole right of taxation was in the colonial legislature, he dissolved the Assembly and also refused to summon the House of Burgesses to take action upon the invitation sent out by Massachusetts in 1765 for co-operation. He died March 3, 1768.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federal convention, the. (search)
al character. George Washington, a delegate from Virginia, was chosen president, and William Jackson, secretary. The convention was composed of some of the most illustrious citizens of the new republic. There was the aged Franklin, past eighty-one years of age, who had sat in a similar convention at Albany (q. v.) in 1754. John Dickinson, of Pennsylvania; W. S. Johnson, of Connecticut; and John Rutledge, of South Carolina, had been members of the Stamp act Congress (q. v.) at New York in 1765. Washington, Dickinson, and Rutledge had been members of the Continental Congress of 1774. From that body also were Roger Sherman, of Connecticut; William Livingston, governor of New Jersey; George Read, of Delaware, and George Wythe, of Virginia. From among the signers of the Declaration of Independence, besides Franklin, Read, Wythe, and Sherman, had come Elbridge Gerry, of Massachusetts, and Robert Morris, George Clymer, and James Wilson, of Pennsylvania. Eighteen members had, at the sa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fitch, Thomas 1699-1777 (search)
Fitch, Thomas 1699-1777 Colonial governor; born in Norwalk, Conn., in June, 1699; graduated at Yale in 1721; elected governor of Connecticut in 1754; and was in office twelve years. In 1765 he took the oath as prescribed in the Stamp Act, although his action was opposed to the sentiment of almost the entire community. In 1766 he retired to private life in consequence of the election of William Pitkin as governor of the colony. He died in Norwalk, in July, 1777.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
Copley gold medal, and the degree of Ll.D. from Oxford and Edinburgh in 1762. Harvard and Yale colleges had previously conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. Franklin was for many years a member of the Assembly and advocated the rights of the people in opposition to the claims of the proprietaries; and in 1764 he was sent to England as agent of the colonial legislature, in which capacity he afterwards acted for several other colonies. His representation to the British ministry, in 1765-66, of the temper of the Americans on the subject of taxation by Parliament did much in effecting the repeal of the Stamp Act. He tried to avert the calamity of a rupture between Great Britain and her colonies; but, failing in this, he returned to America in 1775, after which he was constantly employed at home and abroad in the service of his countrymen struggling for political independence. In Congress, he advocated, helped to prepare and signed the Declaration of Benjamin Franklin. I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fulton, Robert 1765-1815 (search)
Fulton, Robert 1765-1815 Inventor; born in Robert Fulton. Little Britain, Lancaster co., Pa., in 1765; received a common-school education; became a miniature painter; and, at the age of twenty, was practising that profession in Philadelphia, by which he made Fulton's Clermont enough money to buy a small farm in Washington county, on which he placed his mother. Then he went to England; studied painting under Benjamin West; became a civil engineer; and made himself familiar with the stea1765; received a common-school education; became a miniature painter; and, at the age of twenty, was practising that profession in Philadelphia, by which he made Fulton's Clermont enough money to buy a small farm in Washington county, on which he placed his mother. Then he went to England; studied painting under Benjamin West; became a civil engineer; and made himself familiar with the steam engine, then just improved by Watt. He devised various machines, among them an excavator for scooping out the channels of aqueducts. He wrote and published essays on canals and canal navigation in 1795-96. He went to Paris in 1797, and remained there seven years with Joel Barlow, studying languages and sciences, and invented a torpedo. This he offered to the French and English governments, but both rejected the invention, and in December, 1806, he arrived in New York. He went to Washingto
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Genest, or Genet, Edmond Charles 1765-1834 (search)
Genest, or Genet, Edmond Charles 1765-1834 Diplomatist; born in Versailles, France, Jan. 8, 1765. His literary talent was early developed. At the age of twelve years he received from the King of Edmond Charles Genest. Sweden a gold medal for a translation of the history of Eric XIV. into Swedish, with notes by himself. He was a brother of the celebrated Madame Campan, and was brought up in the French Court; yet he was a republican. Attached to the embassies of Berlin, Vienna, London, and St. Petersburg, he maintained his republican bias, and on his return from the Russian Court (1792) was appointed minister to the United States. He had already been made adjutant-general of the armies of France and minister to Holland by the revolutionists, and employed in revolutionizing Geneva and annexing it to France. He arrived at Charleston, S. C., April 9, 1793. He was received with open arms by the Republican, or Democratic, party. He was disposed to treat the United States gover
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), German Flats. (search)
German Flats. Sir William Johnson concluded a treaty of peace with the Western Indians at German Flats, N. Y., it 1765. During the Revolution the Six Nations were induced by him to aid the British, and were led by Joseph Brant and Walter Butler. The Indians plundered and burned Cobleskill, Springfield, German Flats, and Cherry Valley. In retaliation the Americans, led by Colonel Van Schaick and Colonel Willett, laid waste the Indian villages, seizing all provisions and weapons which they could find.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hall, Dominick Augustine 1765-1820 (search)
Hall, Dominick Augustine 1765-1820 Jurist: born in South Carolina in 1765; was district judge of Orleans Territory from 1809 till it became the State of Louisiana in 1812, when he was appointed United States judge of the State. While the city of New Orleans was under martial law early in 1815, General Jackson caused Judge Hall's arrest for interfering with the operations of that law. On his release, in March, he summoned Jackson to answer for contempt of court, and fined him $1,000. He die1820 Jurist: born in South Carolina in 1765; was district judge of Orleans Territory from 1809 till it became the State of Louisiana in 1812, when he was appointed United States judge of the State. While the city of New Orleans was under martial law early in 1815, General Jackson caused Judge Hall's arrest for interfering with the operations of that law. On his release, in March, he summoned Jackson to answer for contempt of court, and fined him $1,000. He died in New Orleans, Dec. 19, 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harper, Robert Goodloe 1765-1825 (search)
Harper, Robert Goodloe 1765-1825 Senator; born in Fredericksburg, Va., in 1765; removed to North Carolina, and towards the close of the Revolutionary War served as a trooper under General Greene; graduated at Princeton in 1785; admitted to the bar in 1786; and served in Congress from 1795 to 1801. During the War of 1812 he was in active service, attaining the rank of major-general. Afterwards he was elected to the United States Senate from Maryland, to which place he had removed upon hi1765; removed to North Carolina, and towards the close of the Revolutionary War served as a trooper under General Greene; graduated at Princeton in 1785; admitted to the bar in 1786; and served in Congress from 1795 to 1801. During the War of 1812 he was in active service, attaining the rank of major-general. Afterwards he was elected to the United States Senate from Maryland, to which place he had removed upon his marriage with the daughter of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, but resigned in 1816, when he was the Federal candidate for Vice-President. He published an Address on the British treaty in 1796, and a pamphlet on the Dispute between the United States and France in 1797. He died in Baltimore, Md., Jan. 15, 1825.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...