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Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907 1 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 1 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 28, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1765 AD or search for 1765 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 105 results in 94 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Nancy 1765-1840 (search)
Hart, Nancy 1765-1840 Patriot; born in Elbert county, Ga., in 1765. During the Revolutionary War she was an ardent patriot, and upon one occasion captured five British soldiers, who were pillaging her house. She concealed their arms and killed two of them who attempted to escape, and held the remaining three until she received assistance from the neighbors. She died in 1840. Hart, Nancy 1765-1840 Patriot; born in Elbert county, Ga., in 1765. During the Revolutionary War she was an ardent patriot, and upon one occasion captured five British soldiers, who were pillaging her house. She concealed their arms and killed two of them who attempted to escape, and held the remaining three until she received assistance from the neighbors. She died in 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Henry, Patrick 1736- (search)
discovered. Then, in a celebrated case tried in the courthouse of Hanover county, he made such a wonderful forensic speech that his fame as an orator was established. Henry became a member of the Virginia House of Patrick Henry. Burgesses in 1765, wherein, that year, he introduced resolutions for bold opposition to the Stamp Act, and made a most remarkable speech. From that time he was regarded as a leader of the radical patriots of his colony. He was admitted to the bar of the highest cegates from the several colonies to meet in New York City in October following. See Stamp act Congress. After his death, there was found among his papers one sealed, and thus endorsed: Enclosed are the resolutions of the Virginia Assembly, in 1765, concerning the Stamp Act. Let my executors open this paper. Within was found a copy of the resolutions in his handwriting. On the back of the paper containing the resolutions is the following endorsement, also in his handwriting: The within re
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkins, Stephen 1707-1785 (search)
many years chancellor of Brown University. Notwithstanding his defective early education, his knowledge of literature, science, and political economy was varied and extensive. He died in Providence, July 13, 1785. Grievances of the American colonies. Under date of July 30, 1764, he issued the following statement in the form of a pamphlet bearing the full title of The grievances of the American colonies candidly examined. The pamphlet was printed by order of the General Assembly in 1765, and reissued in London in the following year: Liberty is the greatest blessing that man can enjoy, and slavery the greatest curse that human nature is capable of. Hence it is a matter of the utmost importance to men which of the two shall be their portion. Absolute liberty is, perhaps, incompatible with any kind of government. The safety resulting from society, and the advantages of just and equal laws, hath caused men to forego some part of their natural liberty, and submit to govern
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hopkinson, Francis 1737-1791 (search)
Hopkinson, Francis 1737-1791 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 21, 1737; graduated at Princeton in 1763, and in 1765 was admitted to the bar. His republican principles caused his removal from a lucrative office in New Jersey. He was a member of Congress in 1776-77, and was distinguished during the Revolution by political and satirical writings. His best known is The battle of the kegs. He was judge of admiralty for ten years —1779-89, and United States district judge from 1790 till his death. He died in Philadelphia May 9, 1791. In January, 1778, while the channel of the Delaware River was nearly free of ice, some Whigs at Bordentown, N. J., sent floating down the stream some torpedoes in the form of kegs filled with gunpowder, and so arranged with machinery that on rubbing against an object they would explode. It was hoped that some of these torpedoes might touch a British war-vessel, explode and sink her. One of them, touching a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howe, Richard, Earl 1725-1799 (search)
Howe, Richard, Earl 1725-1799 Naval officer; born in England, March 19, 1725; was educated at Westminster and Eton; and succeeded to the Irish viscounty and the family estate on the death of his brother, George Augustus Howe, killed near Ticonderoga in 1758. In 1739 he was a midshipman in Anson's fleet, and was made post-captain for gallantry in 1745. He entered Parliament in 1757, and in 1765 was made treasurer of the British navy. In October, 1770, he was promoted to Richard Howe. rearadmiral of the blue, and in 1776 was sent to command the British fleet on the American station, charged with a commission, jointly with his brother, William Howe, to make peace with or war upon the Americans. They failed to secure peace, and made war. After leaving the Delaware with his fleet, in 1778, he had an encounter off Rhode Island with a French fleet, under the Count d'estaing, when he disappeared from the American waters. In 1782 he was made admiral of the blue, and created an Engl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hoyt, Epaphras 1765-1850 (search)
Hoyt, Epaphras 1765-1850 Historian; born in Deerfield, Mass., Dec. 31, 1765; was major-general of the Massachusetts militia. His publications include Treatise on the military art; Military instructions; Cavalry discipline; Antiquarian researches, etc. He died in Deerfield, Mass., Feb. 8, 1850.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunt, Isaac 1751-1809 (search)
Hunt, Isaac 1751-1809 Author; born in Barbadoes, W. I., in 1751; graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1763; admitted to the bar in 1765. When the Revolutionary War broke out he was a strong royalist, and wrote leaflets which led to his imprisonment, but later he escaped and went to England, where he became a clergyman. His publications include The political family, or a discourse pointing out the reciprocal advantages which flow from an uninterrupted Union between Great Britain and her American colonies; Right of Englishmen, an antidote to the poison of Thomas Paine; Autobiography of John Trumbull, etc. He died in London, in 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Samuel 1731-1796 (search)
Huntington, Samuel 1731-1796 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Windham, Conn., July 3, 1731; was brought up on his father's farm and learned the cooper's trade. In 1753 he began to study law; in 1758 settled in the town of Norwich, which he represented in the General Assembly in 1764; in 1765 was made king's attorney; and in 1775 was a member of the upper house in the Connecticut Assembly; was a member of the Continental Congress in 1776-83; president of it in 1779-81; judge of the Supreme Court of Connecticut in 1774-84, and in the latter year was chiefjustice of that court. He was lieutenantgovernor of Connecticut in 1785, and governor in 1786-96. He died in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 5, 1796.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Jared 1749-1781 (search)
Ingersoll, Jared 1749-1781 Born in Milford, Conn., in 1722; graduated at Yale in 1742; was stamp agent in 1765. He was obliged to reship the stamps he had received and to resign his office. He is the author of The Stamp act. He died in New Haven, Conn., in August, 1781. Jurist; born in Connecticut in 1749; graduated at Yale in 1766; studied law in London; returned to Philadelphia in 1771; was a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1780; a member of the Constitutional convention in 1787; and was the Federal candidate for the Vice-Presidency in 1812, but was defeated, receiving 86 electoral votes. He died in Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1822.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Andrew 1767-1845 (search)
Jackson, Andrew 1767-1845 Seventh President of the United States; born in the Waxhaw Settlement, Mecklenburg co., N. C., March 15, 1767. His parents had emigrated from the North of Ireland, in 1765, and were of the Scotch-Irish. At fourteen years of age, Andrew joined the Revolutionary forces in South Carolina. In that service he had two brothers killed. He was with Sumter in the battle of Hanging Rock (q. v.), and in 1781 was made a prisoner. He was admitted to the practice of the law in western North Carolina in 1786; removed to Nashville in 1788; was United States attorney for that district in 1790; member of the convention that framed the State constitution of Tennessee in 1796; member of the United States Senate in 1797; and judge of the Tennessee Supreme Court from 1798 to 1804. From 1798 until 1814 he was major-general of the Tennessee militia, and conducted the principal campaign against the Creek Indians, which resulted in the complete subjugation of that nation
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