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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 73 73 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 69 69 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 56 56 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 34 34 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 21 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 14 14 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 5 5 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 4 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1767 AD or search for 1767 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
Adams, John Quincy, 1767- Sixth President of the United States; from 1825 to 1829; Republican; born in Braintree, Mass., July 11, 1767; was a son of President John Adams; and was graduated at Harvard College in 1787. In February, 1778, he accompanied his father to France, where he studied the French and Latin languages for nearly two years. After an interval, he returned to France and resumed his studies, which were subsequently pursued at Amsterdam and at the University of Leyden. At the age of fourteen years, he accompanied Mr. Dana to Russia as his private secretary. The next year he spent some time at Stockholm, Copenhagen, and Hamburg. He afterwards accompanied his father (who was American minister) to England and France and returned home with him early in 1785. After his graduation at Harvard, he studied law with the eminent Theophilus Parsons, practised at Boston, and soon became distinguished as a political writer. In 1791 he published a series of articles in favor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
e world. Sitka, or New Archangel, the capital of Alaska, is the oldest settlement. It was founded by Russian fur-traders in the nineteenth century. The country was a sort of independent province, under the rule of the Russian-American Fur Company, to whom it was granted by the Emperor Paul in 1799. It was invested with the exclusive right of hunting and fishing in the American waters of the Czar. The charter of the company expired in 1867, when the government declined to renew it. In 1865-67 the country was explored by a scientific corps sent out by the United States to select a route for the Russo-American telegraph line — a project which was abandoned in consequence of the successful laying of the Atlantic cable. Early in 1867 negotiations were begun for the purchase of the Territory by the United States, and a treaty to that effect was ratified by the United States Senate May 20 the same year. The price paid was $7.200,000. In October Gen. Lovell H. Rousseau. a commissioner
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 (search)
Arnold, Benedict, 1741-1801 Military officer; born in Norwich, Conn., Jan. 14, 1741. As a boy he was bold, mischievous, and quarrelsome. Apprenticed to an apothecary, he ran away, enlisted as a soldier, but deserted. For four years (1763-67) he was a bookseller and druggist in New Haven, Conn., and was afterwards master and supercargo of a vessel trading to the West Birthplace of Benedict Arnold. Indies. Immediately after the affair at Lexington, he raised a company of volunteers and marched to Cambridge. There he proposed to the Massachusetts Committee of Safety an expedition against Fort Ticonderoga, and was commissioned a colonel. Finding a small force, under Colonels Easton, Brown, and Allen, on the same errand when he reached western Massachusetts, he joined them without command. Returning to Cambridge, he was placed at the head of an expedition for the capture of Quebec. He left Cambridge with a little more than 1,000 men, composed of New England musketeers and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, (search)
e city. In January, 1730, a town was laid out on the west of this stream, contained in a plot of 60 acres, and was called Baltimore, in honor of Cecil, Lord Baltimore. In the same year William Fell, a ship-carpenter, purchased a tract east of the stream and called it Fell's Point, on the extremity of which Fort McHenry now stands. In 1732 a new town of 10 acres was laid out on the east side of the stream, and called Jonestown. It was united to Baltimore in 1745, dropping its own name. In 1767 Baltimore became the county town. The population in 1890 was 434,439; in 1900, 508,957. When the British army approached the Delaware River (December, 1776), and it was feared that they would cross into Pennsylvania and march on Philadelphia, there was much anxiety among the patriots. The Continental Congress, of the courage and patriotism of which there was a growing distrust, were uneasy. Leading republicans hesitated to go further, and only Washington and a few other choice spirits w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baltimore, Lords. (search)
puty more than thirty years, he died April 24, 1751, at his home in London. Vi. Frederick Calvert, sixth and last Lord Baltimore, Was born in 1731, and succeeded to the title of his father, Charles Calvert II., in 1751. He married Lady Diiana Egerton, youngest daughter of the Duke of Bridgewater, in 1753. He led a disreputable life, and died at the age of forty, at Naples, Sept. 14, 1771. Yet he was a patron of literature and a friend and companion of the Earl of Chatham (Pitt). In 1767 he published an account of his Tour in the East. He was a pretentious author of several other works, mostly of a weak character. Lord Frederick bequeathed the province of Maryland, in tail male, to Henry Harford, then a child, and the remainder, in fee, to his sister. the Hon. Mrs. Norton. He left an estate valued at $5,000. The last representative of the Baltimore family was found in a debtors' prison in England, in 1860, by Col. Angus McDonald, of Virginia, where he had been confined
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barber, Francis, 1751- (search)
Barber, Francis, 1751- Military officer; born in Princeton, N. J., in 1751; was graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1767, and became rector of an academy at Elizabeth, N. J., and pastor of the Presbyterian Church there in 1769. Leaving these posts, he joined the New Jersey line in the Continental army as major, in February, 1776. In November he was made a lieutenant-colonel, and was afterwards assistant inspector-general under Baron Steuben. He was active in several battles until 1779, when he was adjutant-general in Sullivan's campaign, and was wounded in the battle of Newtown. In 1781 he was successful in quelling the mutiny of Pennsylvania and New Jersey troops. He was with the army at Newburg in 1783, and was killed by the falling of a tree while he was riding in the edge of a wood, Feb. 11 the same year.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bayard, James Ashton, 1767- (search)
Bayard, James Ashton, 1767- Statesman; born in Philadelphia, July 28, 1767; of Huguenot descent; was graduated at Princeton in 1784; studied law under Gen. Joseph Reed; was admitted to the bar in 1787, and, settling in Delaware, soon acquired a high reputation as a lawyer. Mr. Bayard was a member of Congress from 1797 to 1803, and a conspicuous leader of the Federal party. In 1804 he was elected to the United States Senate, in which he distinguished himself in conducting the impeachment of Senator Blount. He was chiefly instrumental in securing the election of Jefferson over Burr in 1800; and made, in the House of Representatives, in 1802, a powerful defence of the existing judiciary system, which was soon overthrown. He was in the Senate when war was declared against Great Britain in 1812. In May, 1813, he left the United States on a mission to St. Petersburg, to treat for peace with Great James Ashton Bayard. Britain under Russian mediation. The mission was fruitless. I
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- (search)
Belknap, Jeremy, 1744- Clergyman; born in Boston, June 4, 1744; was graduated at Harvard College in 1762; studied theology; taught school four years; was pastor of a church in Dover. N. H., from 1767 to 1786, and of the Federal Street Church, in Boston, from April 4, 1787, until his death. June 20, 1798. He founded the Massachusetts Historical Society; was an overseer of Harvard College; was a patriot during the war for independence, an opponent of African slavery, and a promoter of literature and science. He published a History of New Hampshire, 3 volumes (1784-92); a collection of Psalms and hymns (1795); The Foresters, a work of wit and humor (1792); American biography, 2 volumes (1794-98), besides sermons and other religious-writings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Black Hawk (search)
Black Hawk (Ma-ka-tae-mish-kia-kiak), a famous Indian: born in Kaskaskia, Ill., in 1767. He was a Pottawattomie by birth, but became a noted chief of the Saes and Foxes. He was accounted a brave when he was fifteen years of age, and soon afterwards led expeditions of war parties against the Osage Indians in Missouri and the Cherokees in Georgia. He became head chief of the Sacs when he was twenty-one years old (1788). Inflamed by Tecumseh and presents from the British agents, he joined the British in the War of 1812-15, with the commission of brigadier-general, leading about 500 warriors. He again reappeared in history in hostilities against the white people on the Northwestern frontier settlements in 1832. In that year eight of a party of Chippewas, on a visit to Fort Snelling, on the west banks of the upper Mississippi, were killed or wounded by a party of Sioux. Four of the latter were afterwards captured by the commander of the garrison at Fort Snelling and delivered up
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
by the taxes, in some measures, merely as taxes? If so, why were they almost all either wholly repealed or exceedingly reduced? Were they not touched and grieved even by the regulating duties of the sixth of George II.? Else why were the duties first reduced to one-third in 1764, and afterwards to a third of that third in the year 1766? Were they not touched and grieved by the stamp act? I shall say they were, until that tax is revived. Were they not touched and grieved by the duties of 1767, which were likewise repealed, and which Lord Hillsborough tells you (for the ministry) were laid contrary to the true principle of commerce? Is not the assurance given by that noble person to the colonies of a resolution to lay no more taxes on them, an admission that taxes would touch and grieve them? Is not the resolution of the noble lord in the blue riband, now standing on your journals, the strongest of all proofs that parliamentary subsidies really touched and grieved them? Else why
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