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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 322 322 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 243 243 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8 208 208 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 78 78 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 49 49 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 23 23 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 21 21 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. 13 13 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 10 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. 9 9 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1775 AD or search for 1775 AD in all documents.

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ted proclamation, a mere brutem fulmen, liberating the slaves in the insurrectionary districts. On the twenty-fourth June, 1776, one of the reasons assigned by Pennsylvania for her separation from the mother country was that, in her sister colonies, the King had excited the negroes to revolt and to imbue their hands in the blood of their masters, in a manner unpractised by civilized nations. This, probably had reference to the proclamation of Dunmore, the last royal Governor of Virginia, in 1775, declaring freedom to all servants or negroes, if they would join for the reducing the colony to a proper sense of its duty. The invitation to the slaves to rise against their masters, the suggested insurrection, caused, says Bancroft, a thrill of indignation to run through Virginia, effacing all differences of party, and rousing one strong, impassioned purpose to drive away the insolent power by which it had been put forth. A contemporary annalist, adverting to the same proclamation, sai